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June, 2012 - Herbal and Health News

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Drug from Easter Island may slow aging
upi.com - 6-30-12
A drug that has Polynesian roots may help the elderly retain the ability to learn and remember, U.S. researchers say.
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Some breast cancer radiation may be halved
upi.com - 6-30-12
An accelerated form of radiation for breast cancer increases the strength of the dose per treatment and requires fewer treatments, U.S. researchers say.
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Tonsillectomy: A summer activity
upi.com - 6-30-12
Along with summer camp and family reunions, an estimated 500,000 U.S. children get tonsillectomies each summer, an otolaryngologist says.
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Transplant patient woke from coma - to ask for KFC chicken burger
telegraph.co.uk - 6-30-12
The family of a critically-ill transplant patient hoped their son might say he loved them when he emerged from an eight-day coma but instead demanded a KFC chicken burger meal. Transplant patient woke from coma - to ask for KFC chicken burger
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Brain device linked to 9 deaths, FDA warns
msnbc.msn.com - 6-30-12
A Covidien device for rare malformed blood vessels can get stuck in the brain and has been linked to nine patient deaths, U.S. regulators warned.
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Kidney Stone Risk Associated With Long-Term Vitamin D And Calcium Intake
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-30-12
A new study presented at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting in Houston reveals that calcium and vitamin D supplements are linked to high levels of calcium in the blood and urine, which could raise the risk of developing kidney stones.
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Our Genes Are Not Yet Ready For So Many Wheat-Based Products
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-30-12
According to an expert in digestive disorders, the current rise in dietary problems related to gluten could be due to over reliance on wheat-based products.
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Drug Trial Participants Not Fully Informed About Placebos
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-30-12
Participants in drug trials are often not fully informed about the effect of placebos, thereby undermining the process of "informed consent", concludes a new study published this week in the open access journal PLoS ONE.
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What hypoallergenic dog?
reuters.com - 6-30-12
The allergy-friendly dog may be little more than wishful thinking, a new study of Labradoodles and other allegedly hypoallergenic breeds suggests.
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People make relationships with characters
upi.com - 6-30-12
Celebrity deaths can strongly affect their fans, who often use social media to grieve the loss of people they've never met, a U.S. researcher says.
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Ethnic food often spicier and healthier
upi.com - 6-30-12
U.S. adults are choosing more ethnic foods and ingredients that not only offer unique flavor and texture, but a variety of health benefits, a researcher says.
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Babies being born addicted to painkillers
upi.com - 6-30-12
Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., said he will propose legislation to address an epidemic of babies being born addicted to prescription pain killers.
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Caffeine Boosts Power for Elderly Muscles
sciencedaily.com - 6-30-12
A new study to be presented at the Society for Experimental Biology meeting on 30th June has shown that caffeine boosts power in older muscles, suggesting the stimulant could aid elderly people to maintain their strength, reducing the incidence of falls and injuries.
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What You Eat Can Prevent Arsenic Overload
sciencedaily.com - 6-30-12
Millions of people worldwide are exposed to arsenic from contaminated water, and we are all exposed to arsenic via the food we eat. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Nutrition Journal has demonstrated that people who ate more dietary vitamin B12 and animal protein had lower levels of arsenic (measured by deposition in toenails). Total dietary fat, animal fat, vegetable fat and saturated fat were also all associated with lower levels of arsenic, while omega 3 fatty acids, such as those found in fish oil, were associated with increased arsenic.
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How Flu Can Cause Severe Infections
sciencedaily.com - 6-30-12
Scientists have discovered a new gene in the influenza virus that helps the virus control the body's response to infection.
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Study Finds Breast Milk Kills HIV
charlotte.cbslocal.com - 6-30-12
Is breast milk the key in the battle against HIV? According to a study published in PLoS Pathogens, researchers from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine found that mice would not contract HIV through virus-tainted human breast milk. In fact, the breast milk killed the virus. The mice used in the study were previously injected with human cells to reconstitute their bodies.
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Raisins may lower post-meal blood sugar
upi.com - 6-29-12
Eating raisins three times a day may significantly lower post-meal blood sugar levels, compared to other common snacks, U.S. researchers say.
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Sunscreen forbidden at schools and camps
usatoday.com - 6-29-12
When parents send children to school or camp, they may worry about many things, from bullies to bus accidents. But unauthorized sunscreen use?
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Summer’s first mosquitoes infected with West Nile Virus found in Boston
boston.com - 6-29-12
Boston health officials reported Thursday afternoon that for the first time this summer, a sampling of mosquitoes has tested positive for West Nile Virus. The mosquitoes were collected in Roslindale on June 20.
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US beaches laden with sewage, bacteria: study
ca.news.yahoo.com - 6-29-12
US beaches can be dirty places, making about 3.5 million people sick each year from sewage in the water, said an annual study Wednesday that rates American beaches by how dirty they are.
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The Supplement Everyone Needs to Take
rodale.com - 6-29-12
Finally, researchers have found a way to counteract the dangerous side effects of dirty air pollution.
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Exercise keeps hot flushes at bay in menopausal women
dailymail.co.uk - 6-29-12
Women who dread the mood swings and muscle aches that come with the change will be relieved to hear they can at least alleviate hot flushes. Scientists found there was a marked decline in how often menopausal women experienced the uncomfortable symptom after a workout. The team from Penn State university said the effect lasted for up to 24 hours after exercise.
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Health care ruling could leave poorest Americans at greatest risk
msnbc.msn.com - 6-29-12
Now that the Supreme Court has upheld President Barack Obama's health care initiative, will Congress have to rewrite it from scratch?
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Is obesity a disease? Doctors disagree
msnbc.msn.com - 6-29-12
Obesity puts people at risk for a whole host of conditions, including Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and sleep problems. But is obesity itself a disease?
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Neuronal Stress And Brain Insulin Resistance Linked To Worsening Alzheimer's Disease
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-29-12
Rhode Island Hospital researcher Suzanne de la Monte, M.D., has found a link between brain insulin resistance (diabetes) and two other key mediators of neuronal injury that help Alzheimer's disease (AD) to propagate. The research found that once AD is established, therapeutic efforts must also work to reduce toxin production in the brain. The study, Dysfunctional Pro-Ceramide, ER Stress, and Insulin/IGF Signaling Networks with Progression of Alzheimer's Disease, is published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.
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Fighting Alzheimer's Disease With Exercise
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-29-12
In a recent Journal of Biological Chemistry "Paper of the Week," research led by Ayae Kinoshita at the Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine in Japan reveals the benefits of exercise in combating Alzheimer's disease.
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Touch Therapy May Reduce Pain, Nausea In Cancer Patients
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-29-12
A new study by the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center shows that patients reported significant improvement in side effects of cancer treatment following just one Jin Shin Jyutsu session. Jin Shin Jyutsu is an ancient form of touch therapy similar to acupuncture in philosophy.
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Cancer Risk Lower In Multiple Sclerosis Patients
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-29-12
Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) are less likely to develop cancer, according to researchers.
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Weight Loss Pill Belviq Gets FDA Approval
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-29-12
The US Food and Drug (FDA) announced on Wednesday that it has approved the weight loss pill Belviq, for use in adults who are obese or overweight, as part of chronic weight management that includes a reduced calorie diet and exercise.
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Next on the gluten-free menu: green banana pasta?
reuters.com - 6-29-12
Green banana pasta: it could be what's for dinner for people with celiac disease.
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Extra weight comes with more knee pain, stiffness
reuters.com - 6-29-12
People who put on weight are more likely to develop knee pain than those who stay the same or lose weight, says a new study.
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U.S. loves hot dogs, but what's in them?
upi.com - 6-29-12
An estimated 150 million wieners are eaten on July 4th but 77 percent of U.S. adults say they are concerned about what's in them, a survey indicated.
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Is Court's Health-Care Ruling a Wise Decision? It Depends...
healthday.com - 6-29-12
Supporters of the Obama administration's health care reform law said Thursday that the U.S. Supreme Court's decision upholding the landmark legislation protects the health of millions of Americans, but critics claim it does so at the expense of key civil liberties and exacts a high economic toll.
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Why Does a Diet High in DHA Improve Memory?
sciencedaily.com - 6-29-12
We've all heard that eating fish is good for our brains and memory. But what is it about DHA, an omega-3 fatty acid found in fish, that makes our memory sharper?
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Flu Immunity Is Affected by How Many Viruses Actually Cause the Infection
sciencedaily.com - 6-29-12
Not only does the type of flu virus affect a patient's outcome, but a new research report appearing in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology suggests that the number of viruses involved in the initial infection may be important too.
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Chlorine can't kill pool germs instantly
upi.com - 6-28-12
Chlorine kills germs in the pool, but it can't work miracles and it doesn't do it instantly, a U.S. health official said.
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Doctors often ignore addiction in patients
upi.com - 6-28-12
Forty million U.S. teens and adults are addicted to nicotine, alcohol or other drugs, but few get treatment, a non-profit group found.
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Can Atkins diet raise heart attack risk for women? Eating high levels of protein can increase chance by a quarter
dailymail.co.uk - 6-28-12
Women on the Atkins diet could be in danger of heart attacks and strokes later in life, claim researchers. They found that regularly eating large amounts of protein but very little carbohydrate increases the risk by more than a quarter.
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Add folic acid to flour to prevent birth defects, doctors tell government
dailymail.co.uk - 6-28-12
Flour should be fortified with folic acid to prevent birth defects in babies such as spina bifida, according to doctors.
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How broken heart syndrome PROTECTS the grief-stricken from dying
dailymail.co.uk - 6-28-12
People who suffer from intense grief after the death of a loved one are often said to be at risk of dying from a broken heart after developing symptoms of cardiac arrest. But scientists studying ‘broken heart syndrome’ have found the condition may actually have a protective purpose by stopping the organ being pumped with too much adrenaline.
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Prolonging suffering of dying patients through medical care is 'evil', BMA conference hears
telegraph.co.uk - 6-28-12
Prolonging the suffering of a dying patient in pain is an 'unequivocal evil' the British Medical Association conference was told today.
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Prostate cancer breakthrough drug 'available by Christmas'
telegraph.co.uk - 6-28-12
Men with advanced prostate cancer could get access within months to a once-a-day pill described as being as big a breakthrough for treatment of the disease as Herceptin has been for breast cancer.
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Advising Mothers On Healthy Kids' Body Weights Is Effective
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-28-12
More than 43 million children of preschool age worldwide are obese, and studies have shown that obesity could significantly impact children's health in later life. Now, researchers say that educating new mothers about healthy eating and active play can reduce the risk of their child being overweight or obese. The study is published in BMJ (British Medical Journal).
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Stem Cell Breakthrough Significant For Degenerative Diseases
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-28-12
Researchers in Israel have achieved a significant global milestone in stem cell technology: they have created the first human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines that are free of animal contamination and whose production complies with Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP). The achievement paves the way for developing clinical treatments that use hESCs to treat degenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD), type 1 diabetes, heart failure and Parkinson's.
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Fearing childbirth may prolong labor
cnn.com - 6-28-12
Dr. Stuart Fischbein chuckled when he read the title of the press release: "Women with a fear of childbirth endure a longer labor."
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Side effects persist after prostate cancer treatment
reuters.com - 6-28-12
Men who are treated for prostate cancer may still suffer side effects from treatment up to a decade later, a new study finds.
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People turn to high-calorie food first after fasting
reuters.com - 6-28-12
People who haven't eaten for many hours turn to high-calorie foods like starches and proteins - not vegetables - once they can satisfy their hunger, a new study suggests.
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Early menopause tied to higher heart disease risk
reuters.com - 6-28-12
Women who go through menopause before age 46 are twice as likely to have a heart attack or stroke as women who hit menopause later, according to a new study.
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U.S.: 41% diagnosed with HIV at first test
upi.com - 6-28-12
U.S. health officials said a study found many persons newly diagnosed with HIV had never been tested previously.
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Annual Beaches Report Finds Water Quality Lacking Along U.S. Shores
healthday.com - 6-28-12
If you're headed to the seashore this summer, the last thing you want to hear is that you and your family could bring home a nasty disease after taking a dip in the ocean.
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FDA Approves First New Weight-Loss Drug in More Than a Decade
healthday.com - 6-28-12
The first new weight-loss drug in 13 years was approved Wednesday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
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Prenatal Exposure to Common Household Chemical Linked to Eczema
healthday.com - 6-28-12
Babies born to women who were exposed to the common household chemical butyl benzyl phthalate (BBzP) during pregnancy are at greater risk for childhood eczema, new research suggests.
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Smoking, Pesticides Might Spur Rare 'Sleep-Kicking' Disorder
healthday.com - 6-28-12
Smoking and exposure to pesticides are two factors that could raise the risk for a rare disorder that causes people to sometimes kick, punch or otherwise move about while asleep, a new study suggests.
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A Step Toward Minute Factories That Produce Medicine Inside the Body
sciencedaily.com - 6-28-12
Scientists are reporting an advance toward treating disease with minute capsules containing not drugs -- but the DNA and other biological machinery for making the drug. In an article in ACS' journal Nano Letters, they describe engineering micro- and nano-sized capsules that contain the genetically coded instructions, plus the read-out gear and assembly line for protein synthesis that can be switched on with an external signal.
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Injecting Life-Saving Oxygen Into a Vein
sciencedaily.com - 6-28-12
Patients unable to breathe because of acute lung failure or an obstructed airway need another way to get oxygen to their blood -- and fast -- to avoid cardiac arrest and brain injury. A team led by researchers at Boston Children's Hospital has designed tiny, gas-filled microparticles that can be injected directly into the bloodstream to quickly oxygenate the blood.
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New Vaccine for Nicotine Addiction
sciencedaily.com - 6-28-12
Researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College have developed and successfully tested in mice an innovative vaccine to treat nicotine addiction.
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Diabetes can return after gastric bypass
upi.com - 6-27-12
Gastric bypass surgery reverses type 2 diabetes in many obese patients but the disease recurs within five years in 21 percent of cases, U.S. researchers say.
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Low-carb diet burns the most calories in small study
usatoday.com - 6-27-12
A new study is raising questions about the age-old belief that a calorie is a calorie.
The research finds that dieters who were trying to maintain their weight loss burned significantly more calories eating a low-carb diet than they did eating a low-fat diet.
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Is Yoga All the Exercise You Need?
rodale.com - 6-27-12
Yoga is on par with aerobic exercise as one of the best things you can do for mind, body, and spirit, research suggests.
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It's been linked to breast cancer but may ward off diabetes. Confusing? So what is the truth about women and alcohol?
dailymail.co.uk - 6-27-12
Gone are the days when women might sip a sweet sherry at Christmas but leave the serious drinking to the menfolk. Twenty years ago, women drank on average five and a half units per week. It’s now closer to eight units, with a rising number, nearly a fifth of women, drinking more than the recommended maximum of 14 units a week.
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Free rapid HIV test now in some drugstores
msnbc.msn.com - 6-27-12
Would you go to a drugstore to get tested for AIDS? Health officials want to know, and they're setting up a pilot program to find out.
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The Internet - Men And Women Have Different Preferences
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-27-12
Psychologists from the Department of Psychology at the University of Bath, England, have discovered in their research that over the past 10 years, the difference between how men and women use the Internet has become even more significant.
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Fruits And Veggies Linked With Smoking Cessation
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-27-12
According to a new study, published in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research and conducted by researchers at the University of Buffalo, eating fruits and veggies may curb the urge to smoke, making it easier to kick the habit and keep it away.
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It's true - you can practice in your sleep
cnn.com - 6-27-12
Northwestern University researchers are validating procrasti-nappers everywhere – they say a 90-minute nap can actually help in learning a new skill.
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Exercise and diet cuts metabolic syndrome risk
upi.com - 6-27-12
Older adults, who are obese can reduce their metabolic syndrome risk by not only losing weight, but by adding exercise as well, U.S. researchers say.
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Crop fungicide linked to diabetes
upi.com - 6-27-12
A fungicide used on crops can induce insulin resistance, demonstrating environmental pollutants as potential contributors to diabetes, U.S. researchers say.
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EEG brain trace 'can detect autism'
bbc.co.uk - 6-27-12
A simple brain trace can identify autism in children as young as two years old, scientists believe.
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Role of stress in dementia investigated
bbc.co.uk - 6-27-12
UK experts are to begin a study to find out if stress can trigger dementia.
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Certain Diets May Help Body Burn More Calories: Study
healthday.com - 6-27-12
Dieters have long been told that to lose weight, you simply need to cut calories. But new research suggests that some combinations of foods may burn more calories than others.
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Bacterial Vaginosis Increases Female-to-Male HIV Transmission Risk
healthday.com - 6-27-12
HIV-positive women with bacterial vaginosis, a disruption in the normal balance between healthy and harmful bacteria in the vagina, are three times more likely to pass HIV on to male sexual partners, according to a new study.
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Limited Radiation May Help Some Kids With Lymphoma
healthday.com - 6-27-12
Limited radiation therapy was associated with high rates of two-year, event-free survival in children with favorable-risk Hodgkin lymphoma who had a complete response to chemotherapy, a new study shows.
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Curry Spice, Omega-3 Fatty Acid Preserve Walking Ability Following Spinal-Cord Injury
sciencedaily.com - 6-27-12
UCLA researchers discovered that a diet enriched with a popular omega-3 fatty acid and an ingredient in curry spice preserved walking ability in rats with spinal-cord injury. Published June 26 in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, the findings suggest that these dietary supplements help repair nerve cells and maintain neurological function after degenerative damage to the neck.
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Seeing Inside Tissue for No-Cut Surgeries: Researchers Develop Technique to Focus Light Inside Biological Tissue
sciencedaily.com - 6-27-12
Imagine if doctors could perform surgery without ever having to cut through your skin. Or if they could diagnose cancer by seeing tumors inside the body with a procedure that is as simple as an ultrasound. Thanks to a technique developed by engineers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), all of that may be possible in the not-so-distant future.
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Moderate Coffee Consumption Offers Protection Against Heart Failure, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 6-27-12
While current American Heart Association heart failure prevention guidelines warn against habitual coffee consumption, some studies propose a protective benefit, and still others find no association at all. Amidst this conflicting information, research from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center attempts to shift the conversation from a definitive yes or no, to a question of how much.
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Glucose Deprivation Activates Feedback Loop That Kills Cancer Cells, Study Shows
sciencedaily.com - 6-27-12
Compared to normal cells, cancer cells have a prodigious appetite for glucose, the result of a shift in cell metabolism known as aerobic glycolysis or the "Warburg effect." Researchers focusing on this effect as a possible target for cancer therapies have examined how biochemical signals present in cancer cells regulate the altered metabolic state.
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DEMENTIA CAUSED BY STRESSFUL LIFESTYLE
express.co.uk - 6-26-12
STRESSFUL lifestyles could be the key trigger for incurable Alzheimer’s disease, scientists believe. Even the trauma of bereavement or moving home could bring on dementia.
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Legal marijuana, but Uruguay won't be a drug tourist haven
smh.com.au - 6-26-12
Uruguay's government plans to start growing marijuana soon after a law legalising sales of the drug passes Congress, but a ban on selling to foreigners will stop the country becoming a drug tourism hot-spot, officials say.
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So that's what makes Popeye strong! Spinach found to boost key protein in muscles
dailymail.co.uk - 6-26-12
Popeye knew it worked – and now scientists think they have figured out why. A study has explained how spinach makes our biceps bulge. Tests on mice showed that nitrate, a compound found in high quantities in spinach, boosts the production of two proteins key to muscle strength.
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IVF 'may increase breast cancer risk in younger women'
dailymail.co.uk - 6-26-12
IVF treatment early in adulthood dramatically increases a woman's chance of developing breast cancer, research suggests. Women who started taking fertility drugs and went through IVF around their 24th birthday were found to have a 56 per cent greater chance of developing breast cancer than those in the same age group who went through treatments without IVF.
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Early ADHD treatment helps kids do better in math
msnbc.msn.com - 6-26-12
New research from Iceland suggests kids who get early treatment for their attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder don't have as much trouble on national standardized tests as those who aren't prescribed medication until age 11 or 12.
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Vitamin B3 Found In Milk May Result In Substantial Health Benefits
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-26-12
A new study from researchers at the Weill Cornell Medical College and the Swiss Polytechnic School in Lausanne reveals that a unique form of vitamin B3 that occurs in small quantities in milk produces substantial health benefits in high doses in mice.
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Healthy Eating Hindered By Parents' Work-Life Stress
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-26-12
In a tight economy, with fewer jobs, many people end up working harder and sacrificing more to stay employed. A new study finds that one of those sacrifices is sometimes their own and their family's nutrition.
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Speech Algorithms To Detect Parkinson's Disease
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-26-12
A British mathematician hopes he can speed up the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease with a cheap test that uses speech signal processing algorithms he developed at Oxford University in the UK.
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What the Yuck: Can I mix coffee with my meds?
cnn.com - 6-26-12
Q: Is it true that coffee doesn't mix well with some medications?
A: That's true, unless you're drinking decaf. It's best not to combine large amounts of caffeine with any drug that has stimulant effects, such as pseudoephedrine (which is found in some cold and allergy meds), because the caffeine can heighten the drug's side effects, which may include weakness, nausea, and an irregular heartbeat.
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Vitamin D deficiency may cause weight gain
cnn.com - 6-26-12
A Kaiser Permanente study, published online in the recent issue of the Journal of Women's Health, looked at more than 4,600 women aged 65 and older for a four and one-half year period. Researchers found women with low levels of vitamin D in their blood gained about two pounds more than those with adequate levels of the vitamin.
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Moderate exercise tied to lower breast cancer risk
reuters.com - 6-26-12
Women who exercise moderately may be less likely than their inactive peers to develop breast cancer after menopause, a study published Monday suggests.
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Canadian officials warn of lasers
upi.com - 6-26-12
Battery-operated, hand-held lasers or laser pointers designed for lecture halls have the potential to cause serious harm, health officials in Canada warn.
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Dads pass on how to make money to sons
upi.com - 6-26-12
Human capital -- intelligence, advice, work ethic -- may be why high-income fathers have richer sons, U.S. researchers say.
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Thyroid problems cause pregnancy issues
upi.com - 6-26-12
Researchers in India suggest pregnant women should be screened for thyroid dysfunction within the first three months of getting pregnant.
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Pandemic H1N1 Flu Killed Far More Than Reported: Study
healthday.com - 6-26-12
The pandemic H1N1 flu in 2009 may have killed more than 500,000 people around the world, 15 times more than reported, a new study suggests.
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Screen All Adults for Obesity: U.S. Panel
healthday.com - 6-26-12
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released new guidelines Monday recommending that doctors screen all of their patients for obesity and when appropriate, refer them to a comprehensive lifestyle-management program to help them lose weight.
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Are Statins Less Helpful for Women?
healthday.com - 6-26-12
The cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins may be less effective for preventing death and recurrent strokes in women than in men, a new study suggests.
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Sleep Can Sharpen Your Memory
healthday.com - 6-26-12
External stimulation during sleep can help strengthen memory, which, in turn, can help you learn, a new study reports.
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Viewing Images of High-Calorie Foods Brings On High-Calorie Cravings, Research Finds
sciencedaily.com - 6-26-12
You're minding your own business when a food craving suddenly hits, and if you just saw an image of a cupcake, or consumed a sugary soda, that may be no accident.
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Treating Vitamin D Deficiency May Improve Depression
sciencedaily.com - 6-26-12
Women with moderate to severe depression had substantial improvement in their symptoms of depression after they received treatment for their vitamin D deficiency, a new study finds.
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Foxes may hold key to Lyme disease spread
upi.com - 6-25-12
A decline in foxes, not an increase in the deer population, may be responsible for the explosion of Lyme disease in parts of the United States, researchers say.
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Sperm of smoking dads can hurt child DNA
upi.com - 6-25-12
Men who smoke before conception can damage the DNA of their offspring in the womb that may give him or her a higher risk of disease, British researchers say.
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People Forget Names Because They Don't Care
abcnews.go.com - 6-25-12
You're at a party and you're introduced to someone new. The two of you start talking, and in the midst of conversation, you get distracted. You start to think about what you want for dinner, or what your plans are for the weekend. Then, you realize you have completely blanked on your acquaintance's name.
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Why Sunscreens Can't Keep You Safe
rodale.com - 6-25-12
Do sunscreens really ward off cancer? Experts on both sides of the debate agree we depend on them too much.
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Carroll: DEA chief stonewalls on marijuana
denverpost.com - 6-25-12
You know federal drug policy is bankrupt when the chief of the Drug Enforcement Administration is reluctant to acknowledge even a simple fact that any eighth-grader could confirm.
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Don't rush into a prostate operation... it could be the worst thing you do
dailymail.co.uk - 6-25-12
A diagnosis of prostate cancer is shocking and most often quite unexpected. The thought of a tumour growing inside you is sickening. Almost immediately, men face a decision about treatment – and the first impulse is, for many, to want it cut out. As an oncologist with more than 15 years specialising in the condition, you might expect me to agree. But I urge patients not to be so hasty. Mounting evidence shows that surgery is not always the best treatment.
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Wordsworth was right - daffodils do cheer us up
telegraph.co.uk - 6-25-12
The poet wrote that at the mere thought of the flowers "my heart with pleasure fills", and now scientists say they could help treat medical conditions in the brain.
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Two glasses of wine a day improves quality of life for middle-aged
telegraph.co.uk - 6-25-12
A study finds that those who drink in moderation - no more than 14 drinks a week and no more than three a day for women and four a day for men - have better overall scores than those who abstain completely.
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How a hypnotism show left teen girls in a trance
msnbc.msn.com - 6-25-12
A group of 13- and 14-year old girls recently fell under a mass trance after attending a hypnotism act at their private high school in Quebec. The inexperienced 20-year-old hypnotist -- who claimed to have had about 14 hours of instruction -- had to call on his instructor to help snap the girls out of it, according to a CBC News report.
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High Sugar Cereals Aggressively Marketed At Kids, Despite Pledge
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-25-12
Cereals aimed at kids are generally more nutritious now, but cereal companies are spending more on adverts aimed at encouraging children to eat less nutritious products, researchers from Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity revealed in a new report. The authors added that from 2008 to 2011 there was a 34% increase in cereal advertising aimed at children.
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Exercise helps lung transplant patients
upi.com - 6-25-12
Lung transplant patients who participated in a structured exercise program had lower risk factors for cardiovascular problems, a Belgium researcher says.
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Confusion can be profitable in learning
upi.com - 6-25-12
Confusion while learning can be beneficial if it is properly induced, effectively regulated and ultimately resolved, U.S. researchers say.
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Some Diabetics May Not Benefit From Daily Aspirin
healthday.com - 6-25-12
Millions of Americans take a low-dose aspirin each day to help protect their hearts, but a new study suggests the pill's benefit may not extend to some people with type 2 diabetes.
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Secondhand Smoke Linked to Raised Diabetes Risk
healthday.com - 6-25-12
Exposure to secondhand smoke seems to be associated with an increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in adults, according to a new study.
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Learn That Tune While Fast Asleep: Stimulation During Sleep Can Enhance Skill Learning
sciencedaily.com - 6-25-12
Want to nail that tune that you've practiced and practiced? Maybe you should take a nap with the same melody playing during your sleep, new provocative Northwestern University research suggests.
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New AIDS cocktail promises drug limit
upi.com - 6-24-12
Italian scientists say a new drug cocktail appears able to repair AIDS-damaged immune systems, sparing patients a lifetime of medication.
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1 in 10 Fibromyalgia Patients Uses Marijuana to Ease Pain
philly.com - 6-24-12
About 10 percent of fibromyalgia patients use marijuana to relieve symptoms such as pain, fatigue and insomnia, a new study has found.
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Smell your way to love? One matchmaker pairs singles' scents
usatoday.com - 6-24-12
Sniff your way to love? Singles who attend so-called pheromone parties haven't ruled it out. The get-togethers — which have been held in New York and Los Angeles and are planned for other cities — ask guests to submit a slept-in T-shirt that will be smelled by other participants.
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Testosterone makes women want to pleasure themselves rather than have sex
dailymail.co.uk - 6-24-12
It has long been assumed that men typically want to have sex more often than women because they have higher levels of testosterone. But a team from the University of Michigan found that women with high testosterone had a greater desire to masturbate compared to their peers.
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Multiple sclerosis is not a death sentence, Jack Osbourne, there is hope
telegraph.co.uk - 6-24-12
Ozzy and Sharon Osbourne's son Jack Osbourne, newly diagnosed with MS, is reassured by a sufferer who's had the disease for 20 years.
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Nearly 400 now sick from tainted tuna in sushi
msnbc.msn.com - 6-24-12
Nearly 400 people in 27 states and the District of Columbia have now been sickened by an outbreak of two rare strains of salmonella detected in raw tuna products used in sushi and other dishes, health officials said.
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Smoking Linked To Skin Cancer Risk
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-24-12
A meta-analysis published Online First in JAMA's Archives of Dermatology shows that smoking seems to be linked to a higher risk of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma skin cancer.
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IVF in young women tied to later breast cancer
reuters.com - 6-24-12
Women who go through in vitro fertilization (IVF) early in life are at a higher risk of developing breast cancer compared to those who don't undergo the treatment, suggests a new study.
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Study: Omega-3 can lower inflammation
upi.com - 6-24-12
Omega-3 fatty acid supplements can lower inflammation in healthy middle-age and older adults who are overweight, U.S. researchers say.
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U.S. life expectancy stagnating
upi.com - 6-24-12
The United States trails many countries in life expectancy and the poorest Americans live about five fewer years then the wealthiest, researchers say.
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Blood pressure drug linked to GI problems
upi.com - 6-24-12
The blood pressure drug Olmesartan is linked to gastrointestinal issues such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and weight loss, U.S. researchers say.
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Could Fertility Drugs Make Kids Shorter?
healthday.com - 6-24-12
For those who need help getting pregnant, the thought of having a child who's a little shorter than other kids probably won't be much of a worry. But the question of whether infertility treatment causes unanticipated consequences remains fertile ground for researchers.
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Plastics Chemical Linked to Obesity in Kids
healthday.com - 6-24-12
It's hard to imagine a pacifier or a rubber ducky making your child fat.
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Novel Animal Reservoir for Group of Tick-Borne Diseases Discovered -- And It Lives in Your Backyard
sciencedaily.com - 6-24-12
A team of scientists at Washington University in St. Louis has been keeping a wary eye on emerging tick-borne diseases in Missouri for the past dozen years, and they have just nailed down another part of the story.
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South African Daffodils May Be a Future Treatment for Depression
sciencedaily.com - 6-24-12
Scientists have discovered that plant compounds from a South African flower may in time be used to treat diseases originating in the brain -- including depression. At the University of Copenhagen, a number of these substances have now been tested in a laboratory model of the blood-brain barrier.
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Declining Testosterone Levels in Men Not Part of Normal Aging
sciencedaily.com - 6-24-12
A new study finds that a drop in testosterone levels over time is more likely to result from a man's behavioral and health changes than by aging. The study results will be presented June 25 at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting in Houston.
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Pasta Made from Green Banana Flour a Tasty Alternative for Gluten-Free Diets
sciencedaily.com - 6-24-12
People with celiac disease struggle with limited food choices, as their condition makes them unable to tolerate gluten, found in wheat and other grains. Researchers from the University of Brazil have developed a gluten-free pasta product from green banana flour, which tasters found more acceptable than regular whole wheat pasta. The product has less fat and is cheaper to produce than standard pastas.
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Dad's Brains Mean More to His Son's Success Than His Money: Study
sciencedaily.com - 6-23-12
Sons of fathers with high incomes tend to end up with higher than average incomes themselves, but new research shows that it's not just dad's money that helps a son on his way.
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How Stress Can Boost Immune System
sciencedaily.com - 6-23-12
A study spearheaded by a Stanford University School of Medicine scientist has tracked the trajectories of key immune cells in response to short-term stress and traced, in great detail, how hormones triggered by such stress enhance immune readiness. The study, conducted in rats, adds weight to evidence that immune responsiveness is heightened, rather than suppressed as many believe, by the so-called "fight-or-flight" response.
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I Want to Know Where Love Is: First Brain Map of Love and Desire
sciencedaily.com - 6-23-12
Thanks to modern science, we know that love lives in the brain, not in the heart. But where in the brain is it -- and is it in the same place as sexual desire? A recent international study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine is the first to draw an exact map of these intimately linked feelings.
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Stagnating Life Expectancies in United States: Poorer U.S. Citizens Live Five Years Less Than the Affluent
sciencedaily.com - 6-23-12
Despite modest gains in lifespan over the past century, the United States still trails many of the world's countries when it comes to life expectancy, and its poorest citizens live approximately five years less than more affluent persons, according to a new study from Rice University and the University Colorado at Boulder.
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Happiness rooted in respect, not money
upi.com - 6-23-12
Overall happiness is related to respect and admiration in your inner circle, not how much money a person has in his or her bank account, U.S. researchers say.
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Counterfeit health products can be harmful
upi.com - 6-23-12
Health Canada officials say counterfeit health products may not just be phoney, they may also be dangerous and cause negative health effects.
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When Patients With Fibromyalgia Try Marijuana
npr.org - 6-23-12
Advocates for cannabis decriminalization have long touted marijuana's potential medical benefits, but some new research suggests that the grass, as it were, may not always be greener.
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Kids' cereal: still too sweet? Group updates 'worst' list
usatoday.com - 6-23-12
Sorry kids: Froot Loops and Cocoa Puffs still aren't health foods. While most cereals marketed to children have gotten a bit healthier -- lower in sugar and salt and higher in whole grains and fiber -- they still typically contain a spoonful of sugar for every three spoonfuls of cereal, says a new report from watchdogs at the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity. Meanwhile, companies are spending more money to market their least nutritious brands, researchers say.
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The Danger Of Magnets In The Home
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-23-12
Magnetic toys are growing in popularity, but so is the accidental ingestion of magnetic elements among children. In a letter published in The Lancet, Doctors highlight the dangers of swallowing magnets and advise parents to take extra care that their children do not accidentally ingest them.
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Mother To Child HIV Transmission Blocked By Drug Combo
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-23-12
According to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers have found that a two- or three-drug combination can reduce the risk of mother-to-child HIV transmission by around 50%.
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Head And Neck Cancer Patients With Chronic Inflammation More Likely To Be HPV Positive
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-23-12
Researchers have discovered in a study published Online First in JAMA's Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery that patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, who have a history of chronic inflammation, such as periodontitis (gum disease) could be linked to having a higher risk of testing positive for human papillomavirus tumors (HPV).
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Autoimmune Disease Rates Increasing
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-23-12
According to a new study the prevalence and incidence of autoimmune diseases, such as lupus, celiac disease, and type 1 diabetes, is on the rise and researchers at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention are unsure why.
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Opioid Pain Killer Side Effects - Which Factors Contribute?
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-23-12
Morphine, methadone and oxycodone are all powerful opioid medications that are prescribed to millions of patients in the United States each year. However, these drugs have severe side effects including addiction, itching, nausea, and the slowing or stopping of breathing.
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Focusing kids with autism improves speech
upi.com - 6-23-12
Having adults engage the attention of autistic preschool children by gesturing and pointing to toys increases children's language skills, U.S. researchers say.
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1.8 million in U.S. allergic to tree nuts
upi.com - 6-23-12
About 1.8 million Americans are allergic to tree nuts, which are among the leading causes of fatal and near-fatal food reactions, a U.S. expert says.
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Drugs help infants from getting mom's HIV
upi.com - 6-23-12
Adding nevirapine to drugs given newborns of women diagnosed with HIV shortly before or during labor halves the newborns' risk of HIV, U.S. researchers say.
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Exercise Won't Affect Breast Milk, Baby's Growth: Study
healthday.com - 6-23-12
Breast-feeding mothers sometimes worry that exercise may affect their breast milk -- and ultimately their baby's growth. Now, researchers who re-evaluated the few published research studies that exist say it does not appear that mom's workout will affect her infant's growth.
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Active, Outdoor Teens Are Happier Teens: Study
healthday.com - 6-23-12
Teens who engaged in more moderate-to-vigorous outdoor activity reported better health and social functioning than their peers who spent hours in front of television and computer screens, a new study in Australia has found.
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Study: Obesity Could Lead To Depletion Of Earth’s Resources
atlanta.cbslocal.com - 6-22-12
A recent study conducted by scientists in London found that the obese persons of the world are playing an increasingly large role in the rate at which the planet’s finite resources are used.
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Uruguay to become first government to SELL cannabis to its citizens
dailymail.co.uk - 6-22-12
Uruguay could become the first country in the world to sell marijuana to its citizens as it attempts to fight a growing crime problem. Under the plan, only the government would be allowed to sell marijuana to adults who have registered on a government database - letting officials keep track of their purchases over time. Minister of Defense Eleuterio Fernandez Huidobro said the measure aims to weaken crime in the country by removing profits from drug dealers and diverting users from harder drugs.
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Uruguay in plan to legalise marijuana
ft.com - 6-22-12
Uruguay’s leftist government has announced plans to legalise marijuana in a bid to halt rising crime.
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Kidney-donor deaths linked to surgical clips raise issues of alerts, warnings
cnn.com - 6-22-12
When Manuel Reyna developed a deadly kidney disease, his sister, Florinda Gotcher, didn't hesitate to give him one of her kidneys. When she found out they were a match, she cried.
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Dogs can help prevent childhood asthma
msnbc.msn.com - 6-22-12
The microbes living on your pet dog may help to strengthen your immune system and prevent childhood asthma, according to a new study.
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Salad Dressings May Improve Nutrient Uptake
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-22-12
The vegetables in salads are chock-full of important vitamins and nutrients, but you won't get much benefit without the right type and amount of salad dressing, a Purdue University study shows.
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Rare Drug-Resistant Bacteria Spotted in U.S. Hospital
healthday.com - 6-22-12
A rare type of deadly bacteria was found in two patients in a Rhode Island hospital in 2011, but swift treatment and infection control measures stopped any further spread, a new government report shows.
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7 years after bariatric surgery, heart risk lowered
upi.com - 6-22-12
Eleven risk factors for heart attack remained greatly reduced among gastric bypass patients seven years after they had the surgery, U.S. researchers found.
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Study: Traffic Noise Linked to Heart Attack Risk
healthland.time.com - 6-22-12
Whether you’re stuck in it or breathing in the fumes, traffic is no good for your health. Now, a new study from Denmark finds that there’s something else about roadway traffic that’s bad for you: the noise. Researchers found that people who lived with louder sounds of traffic near their homes had a higher risk of heart attack.
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Some Kinds of Red Wine May Not Trigger Migraines
webmd.com - 6-22-12
Many migraine sufferers find that the pleasure of a having a glass of red wine is soon followed by the pain of a headache. Now a small new study suggests that when it comes to migraines, some types of red wine may be more likely to trigger a headache than others.
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Apple Peel Compound May Help Ward Off Obesity
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 6-22-12
A compound found in apple peels called ursolic acid may protect against obesity, a new study in mice suggests.
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Low-fat salad dressing is 'bad for you': Study claims calorie-light versions contain fewer health benefits
dailymail.co.uk - 6-22-12
Choosing a low-fat dressing for your salad might help you keep your weight down because it has fewer calories – but you could lose some other health benefits, a study shows.
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Experts say science lacking on 9/11 and cancer
msnbc.msn.com - 6-22-12
Call it compassionate, even political. But ... scientific? Several experts say there's no hard evidence to support the federal government's declaration this month that 50 kinds of cancer could be caused by exposure to World Trade Center dust.
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How Stomach Ulcer Bacterium Avoids Acid
time.com - 6-22-12
By studying its crystal structure, scientists have discovered how the stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori manages to navigate away from high levels of stomach acid. The discovery should lead to new ways to treat H. pylori infection, which is linked to stomach ulcers and cancer.
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‘Clinically Dead’? How Many Kinds of Dead Are There?
time.com - 6-22-12
News reports declaring deposed Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak 'clinically dead' have onlookers confused. One would think 'dead' is a pretty straightforward characterization, but nowadays defining death is a little more complicated.
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Hot water, not pee, eases jellyfish stings
reuters.com - 6-22-12
There's a lot of folklore on how to treat a jellyfish sting, but the science suggests your best bets may be hot water and topical painkillers -- at least in North American waters.
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Men with HIV at risk of low bone mass
upi.com - 6-22-12
HIV-positive young men who are being treated for the disorder appear to be at greater risk than other men their age of low bone mass, U.S. researchers said.
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Eating Disorders Hitting Women Over 50, Study Finds
healthday.com - 6-22-12
Although eating disorders are typically thought of as a problem among teenage girls, many women over 50 practice unhealthy eating behaviors, a new study indicates.
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Study Ties Kids' Allergy Risks to Antibacterials, Preservatives
healthday.com - 6-22-12
Antibacterials and preservatives in products such as soap, toothpaste and mouthwash may be linked to an increased risk of allergies in children, according to a new study.
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Once-Banned Bird Flu Study Yields Sobering Findings
healthday.com - 6-22-12
As few as five mutations are enough to make the H5N1 avian influenza virus transmissible via airborne droplets between ferrets, according to a new, highly anticipated report.
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Parents -- Not TV -- May Determine Whether Kids Are Active or Couch Potatoes
sciencedaily.com - 6-22-12
Researchers at Oregon State University have confirmed what we knew all along -- children in this country are increasingly sedentary, spending too much time sitting and looking at electronic screens.
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Jogging in forest twice as good as trip to gym for mental health
telegraph.co.uk - 6-21-12
A jog through a forest can cut the risk of suffering from mental health problems and is twice as good for you as working out in the gym, according to a survey.
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The Worst Cleaners in America
rodale.com - 6-21-12
A squeaky-clean, spotless house brings a sense of pride to many Americans, but here's the toxic truth: something that should be making us feel good is actually making us people sick.
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How that tickly cough is all in the mind: How placebo throat spray halves irritation
dailymail.co.uk - 6-21-12
The desire to cough can be soothed by a placebo, a study has found, suggesting that the irritating action is not just a simple reflex.
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Poll: Just 1 in 3 backs Obama health care law
msnbc.msn.com - 6-21-12
Just a third of Americans back President Barack Obama's health care overhaul on which the Supreme Court is about to pass judgment, a new poll finds. But there is overwhelming support among both supporters and opponents for Congress and the president to begin work on a new bill if the high court strikes down the two-year-old law.
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Dogs can help prevent childhood asthma
msnbc.msn.com - 6-21-12
The microbes living on your pet dog may help to strengthen your immune system and prevent childhood asthma, according to a new study.
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Why does music help some coma patients?
msnbc.msn.com - 6-21-12
After suffering a brain hemorrhage, 7-year-old Charlotte Neve slipped into a coma. The British girl was unconscious for several days and doctors feared she wouldn’t recover. Her mother, Leila Neve, was at her bedside when Adele’s “Rolling in the Deep” started playing on the radio. Leila and Charlotte often sang the song together and Leila began singing along.
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Value Of Liver Cancer Screening Doubtful Says Danish Study
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-21-12
A new study from Denmark finds that people with alcoholic cirrhosis are no more likely to die from liver cancer than other people. The researchers conclude screening such patients is unlikely to save lives and would not be cost-effective.
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Prostate Cancer Risk Higher For Heavy Tea Drinkers
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-21-12
A new study from Scotland has found that men who are heavy tea drinkers may be at higher risk for prostate cancer. However, the researchers point out their study was not designed to find causes, so all they can say is that heavy tea drinking is linked to a higher risk for prostate cancer and not necessarily the cause of it.
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Kids In Hospital With High Blood Pressure Double In Ten Years, US
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-21-12
The number of children seen as inpatients in US hospitals nearly doubled in the ten years leading up to 2006, according to a new study published online in the journal Hypertension this week that also drew attention to the associated dramatic increase in healthcare cost.
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Ticks causing mysterious meat allergy
cnn.com - 6-21-12
Helen Olive had her first allergy attack 11 years ago. She had gone to bed only to wake up hours later because her neck felt as if it were on fire.
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Less-invasive weight loss surgery safer: study
reuters.com - 6-21-12
Minimally-invasive weight loss surgery is safer than open surgery, with patients suffering fewer complications during those procedures, according to a new study of more than 150,000 people who had a gastric bypass in the United States.
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Parent may be slow to act on suicide risk
upi.com - 6-21-12
Rural parents may be slow to act if told their children may be at risk of suicide, U.S. researchers said.
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Some fat with vegetables beneficial
upi.com - 6-21-12
Those who choose no-fat or low-fat dressings for vegetables or salads may miss out on a significant amount of vitamins and nutrients, U.S. researchers found.
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Smartphone users 'risking health' with overuse of devices
bbc.co.uk - 6-21-12
People are risking their health by working on smartphones, tablets and laptops after they have left the office, according to the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy.
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PTSD Symptoms Common After Heart Attack: Study
healthday.com - 6-21-12
One in eight heart attack survivors experiences signs of post-traumatic stress disorder, the same condition that disables many combat veterans and assault victims, according to a new analysis.
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Deep Brain Stimulation May Offer Longer-Term Relief for Parkinson's
healthday.com - 6-21-12
Deep brain stimulation, a treatment that involves the surgical implantation of wires in the brain that deliver an electrical current, could improve motor functions for at least three years in people with advanced Parkinson's disease, new research suggests.
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'Absentminded' Errors Common in Older Adults: Study
healthday.com - 6-21-12
It's common for seniors to struggle to recall a word that's on the tip of their tongue, a new study shows.
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Children Exposed to HIV in the Womb at Increased Risk for Hearing Loss
sciencedaily.com - 6-21-12
Children exposed to HIV in the womb may be more likely to experience hearing loss by age 16 than are their unexposed peers, according to scientists in a National Institutes of Health research network.
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Top doctor's chilling claim: The NHS kills off 130,000 elderly patients every year
dailymail.co.uk - 6-21-12
NHS doctors are prematurely ending the lives of thousands of elderly hospital patients because they are difficult to manage or to free up beds, a senior consultant claimed yesterday.
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Skin cancer most preventable, yet rates up
upi.com - 6-20-12
Ultraviolet overexposure from sunlight or tanning beds is easily preventable, but skin cancer's incidence rates continue to rise, a U.S. dermatologist says.
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How Do Infections Lead To Malignancy?
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-20-12
Viral or bacterial chronic inflammations of the colon, liver or stomach are often large risk factors for cancer. A new MIT study published the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences provides a detailed explanation as to how infections like these can turn healthy tissues into cancerous ones.
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Kid hypertension hospitalizations double
upi.com - 6-20-12
Pediatric hypertension-related U.S. hospitalizations nearly doubled from 12,661 in 1997 to 24,602 in 2006, researchers found.
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Money can't make you happy... if you are only spending it to impress others
dailymail.co.uk - 6-20-12
Spending money on once in a lifetime experiences from luxury holidays to concert tickets won't make you happy, according to a surprise study. But before you cancel that world cruise it's worth noting that you'll only fail to find contentment if your motive is to impress others. 'Why you buy is just as important as what you buy,' said assistant profressor Ryan Howell, from San Francisco State University, who led the study.
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Study: Legalizing medical pot doesn't boost teen drug use
msnbc.msn.com - 6-20-12
The legalization of medical marijuana in several states had no impact on high school students’ likelihood of experimenting with the drug, a new study suggests.
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UV exposure may lower pancreatic cancer risk, study suggests
msnbc.msn.com - 6-20-12
Exposure to ultraviolet radiation may lower the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, according to a new study from Australia.
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Assisted Dying - Doctors Should Remain Neutral
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-20-12
A resent study has shown that 62 percent of 1004 GPs believe that medical bodies, such as the BMA (British Medical Association) should adopt a position of "studied neutrality", with regard to the question whether assisted dying for terminally ill adults who are mentally competent should be legalized.
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Antibacterials in Personal-Care Products Linked to Allergy Risk in Children
sciencedaily.com - 6-20-12
Exposure to common antibacterial chemicals and preservatives found in soap, toothpaste, mouthwash and other personal-care products may make children more prone to a wide range of food and environmental allergies, according to new research from Johns Hopkins Children's Center.
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Foxglove Therapy Explained
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-20-12
The herb Foxglove has been used for centuries to cleanse wounds and Native Americans brewed its dried leaves in order to treat leg swelling caused by cardiovascular problems. Now, researchers have discovered that an active ingredient in Foxglove (digitalis) called digoxin, can improve the body's own protective mechanism against heart failure and hypertension.
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1 in 8 with Alzheimer's, delirium face complications
reuters.com - 6-20-12
About one in eight Alzheimer's patients with severe confusion has a major complication within a year of getting out of the hospital, in a new study.
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Survey: Fewer Canadians smoke, more drink
upi.com - 6-20-12
Fewer Canadians smoked tobacco in 2011 than before, but the rate of heavy drinking increased, a Statistics Canada national health survey showed Tuesday.
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Smartphone users 'risking health' with overuse of devices
bbc.co.uk - 6-20-12
People are risking their health by working on smartphones, tablets and laptops after they have left the office, according to the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy.
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Colds May Be Even More 'Common' Than People Think
healthday.com - 6-20-12
The virus that causes the common cold may be more prevalent among college students than previously thought because many young adults with the virus do not have any symptoms, a new study has found.
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Baby soaps and shampoos trigger positive marijuana tests
news.yahoo.com - 6-20-12
Commonly used baby soaps and shampoos, including products from Johnson & Johnson, Aveeno and CVS, can trigger a positive result on newborns' marijuana screening tests, according to a recent study. A minute amount of the cleansing products in a urine sample — just 0.1 milliliters or less — was found to cause a positive result.
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Diabetes May Hasten Mental Decline
healthday.com - 6-19-12
Older adults with diabetes and poor blood sugar control are at increased risk for greater declines in their memory and thinking abilities, a new study finds.
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Chicago Woman Cured of Sickle Cell Disease
sciencedaily.com - 6-19-12
Chicagoan Ieshea Thomas is the first Midwest patient to receive a successful stem cell transplant to cure her sickle cell disease without chemotherapy in preparation for the transplant.
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Clues to Nervous System Evolution Found in Nerve-Less Sponge
sciencedaily.com - 6-19-12
UC Santa Barbara scientists turned to the simple sponge to find clues about the evolution of the complex nervous system and found that, but for a mechanism that coordinates the expression of genes that lead to the formation of neural synapses, sponges and the rest of the animal world may not be so distant after all. Their findings, titled "Functionalization of a protosynaptic gene expression network," are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Loneliness in Older Individuals Linked to Functional Decline, Death
sciencedaily.com - 6-19-12
Loneliness in individuals over 60 years of age appears associated with increased risk of functional decline and death, according to a report published Online First by Archives of Internal Medicine, a JAMA Network publication.
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Just two tablespoons of olive oil a day could cut heart disease risk
dailymail.co.uk - 6-19-12
Olive oil has long been known to be good for the heart. Now scientists have found out exactly how good it can be. And it doesn’t take much to enjoy the benefits.
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Pip breast implants DON'T cause cancer - but they are up to SIX TIMES as likely to rupture
dailymail.co.uk - 6-19-12
The faulty breast implants at the centre of a health scare are up to six times as likely to rupture as other brands - but do not cause cancer. The ruling, by a panel of experts investigating the safety of the Frech-made PIP implants, was revealed today. Their analysis revealed that although the devices could cause irritation, there was no evidence that the gel inside was toxic or were carciogenic.
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Weight-loss surgery linked to higher risk of abusing alcohol
msnbc.msn.com - 6-19-12
In a last ditch effort to lose weight, roughly 113,000 people subject themselves to bariatric surgeries such as stomach banding and gastric bypass every year in the United States. But some of those patients may be trading pounds for an alcohol problem, according to a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery in San Diego, and published by the Journal of the American Medical Association.
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Early Pregnancy Folic Acid Supplements Reduce Autism Risk In Newborns
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-19-12
1 in 88 children born today will be diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Now, researchers have found that women can reduce the risk of having a child with the neurodevelopmental disorder if they consume the recommended daily doses of folic acid (600 micrograms, or 0.6milligrams), the synthetic form of folate or vitamin B-9, during the first month of pregnancy.
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Type 2 Diabetes May Be Diagnosed Late
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-19-12
Despite a high and soaring prevalence of type 2 diabetes in the U.S., the disease is not necessarily promptly detected, according to a diabetes expert who has vast experience as both a researcher and clinician.
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U.S. kids getting more ADHD drugs, fewer antibiotics
reuters.com - 6-19-12
The number of drugs dispensed to U.S. minors has dropped slightly over the past decade, bucking the rise in prescriptions to adults, according to a government report out Monday.
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Global weight gain more damaging than rising numbers
bbc.co.uk - 6-19-12
Researchers say that increasing levels of fatness around the world could have the same impact on global resources as an extra billion people.
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Many Homeless May Harbor Hepatitis C
healthday.com - 6-19-12
Nearly 27 percent of homeless adults in Los Angeles may have hepatitis C, and nearly half don't know they have the potentially deadly infection, researchers say.
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Wild Almond Tree Oil May Combat Obesity, Diabetes
sciencedaily.com - 6-19-12
A future weapon in the battle against obesity and diabetes could come in the form of an oil derived from the seeds of wild almond trees, according to researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology.
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Peaches, Plums, Nectarines Give Obesity, Diabetes Slim Chance
sciencedaily.com - 6-19-12
Peaches, plums and nectarines have bioactive compounds that can potentially fight-off obesity-related diabetes and cardiovascular disease, according to new studies by Texas AgriLife Research.
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How to treat asthma with diet and herbs
naturalnews.com - 6-18-12
Over the past three decades the number of people with asthma has increased significantly in the United States and diet may be to blame. Studies show a correlation between poor diet and asthma. People are eating more processed, unnatural foods and fewer things that are good for them. People who eat healthy nutritious foods develop asthma less often than people who eat poorly.
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Radioactive buckyballs from Fukushima invade California beaches
naturalnews.com - 6-18-12
As the fallout - no pun intended - from Japan's tsunami-damaged nuclear reactors at its Fukushima complex continues to worsen, scientists are now concerned about another related phenomenon that appears to be invading the U.S. West Coast - buckyballs.
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Stress of family breakdown and rise of obesity levels blamed as girls' puberty age falls to ten
dailymail.co.uk - 6-18-12
The stress of family breakdown could be to blame for girls starting puberty at the age of ten, according to scientists.
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FCC may take up issue of cell phone radiation
msnbc.msn.com - 6-18-12
The head of the Federal Communications Commission is asking for a review of the agency's stance on radiofrequency energy emitted from cell phones amid lingering concerns that the devices may cause brain tumors.
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Thoughts of death make only the religious more devout
msnbc.msn.com - 6-18-12
Thinking about death makes Christians and Muslims, but not atheists, more likely to believe in God, new research finds, suggesting that the old saying about "no atheists in foxholes" doesn't hold water.
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Stroke Treatment Using Stem Cells Shows Early Promise In Controversial Trial
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-18-12
A controversial stem cell treatment for stroke is showing promising signs in the early results of a small safety trial.
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High cholesterol diet helps mice with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease
bbc.co.uk - 6-18-12
A diet high in cholesterol may help people with a fatal genetic disease which damages the brain, according to early studies in mice.
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Safer Grilling Methods Might Cut Cancer Risk
healthday.com - 6-18-12
A few simple changes in how people grill outdoors, such as avoiding too much beef or processed meats and not charring foods, can aid in cancer prevention, according to an expert.
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Hotel Room Germs Abound on TV Remotes, Light Switches
healthday.com - 6-18-12
Television remotes and bedside lamp switches are right up there with toilets and bathrooms sinks in having the highest levels of bacterial contamination in U.S. hotel rooms, a new study shows.
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Pumpkins, rutabagas lead to most injuries
upi.com - 6-17-12
The kitchen is where some of the most serious home accidents occur and cuts are among the most common types of injury, a British safety expert says.
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Hold the Prescription! Consider Natural Remedies for These Ailments
rodale.com - 6-17-12
Experts issue new prescribing guidelines, and say docs need to be more conservative in handing out drug scripts.
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How love of Billy the stray cat has finally brought four-year-old autistic boy out of his shell
dailymail.co.uk - 6-17-12
Even simple tasks used to be fraught with difficulty for Fraser Booth. The four-year-old, who is autistic, easily became overwhelmed by everyday events, resulting in tears and temper tantrums. Then Billy the stray cat came along. Abandoned by his previous owner and rescued from a boarded-up council house by a charity, he had not had the easiest start to life.
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Century-Old Heart Test Still Effective Today
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-17-12
Most people might assume that technology first developed in 1928 would be obsolete by now. But from air conditioned buildings to sliced bread, many inventions of that era are still essential to our lives today.
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Meditation Can Calm Stress, Aid Concentration, Aid Multitasking
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-17-12
Need to do some serious multitasking? Some training in meditation beforehand could make the work smoother and less stressful, new research from the University of Washington shows.
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Obesity In Childhood Can Harm Social And Emotional Well-Being And Academic Performance
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-17-12
Obesity among children has increased dramatically over the past 40 years and has been tied to many health problems. Now a new study has found that children's weight is associated with their math performance.
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Researchers Use Brain Imaging To Uncover Susceptibility To Psychological Stress And Trauma
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-17-12
Most people have intense emotional reactions to traumatizing events like road accidents or combat. But some suffer far longer, caught in the grip of long-term debilitating disorders such as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Because doctors cannot predict who will develop these disorders, however, early or preventive intervention is not available. Now, a new project led by researchers at Tel Aviv University seeks to identify pre-traumatic subjects - those who are more susceptible to long-standing disorders if exposed to a traumatic incident.
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Vitamin D plus calcium tied to longer life
reuters.com - 6-17-12
Older adults who take vitamin D and calcium supplements may live a bit longer than their peers, a new research review suggests.
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Alzheimer's gene 'diabetes link'
bbc.co.uk - 6-17-12
Scientists say they have identified a possible genetic link between diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.
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Newly Aggressive Dogs May Be Reacting to Pain
healthday.com - 6-17-12
Pain may be the cause of sudden, unexplained aggression in dogs, a new study says.
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Low-Dose Vitamin D May Not Prevent Fractures in Healthy Women – What About Higher Doses?
sciencedaily.com - 6-17-12
Vitamin D and calcium are dietary requirements, but it's unclear how much is best for us. New draft findings by the United States Preventive Services Task Force conclude that for healthy, postmenopausal women, daily supplementation with low levels of vitamin D -- up to 400 international units -- combined with 1,000 milligrams of calcium, does not reduce fracture risk.
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Answer Isn't Always On the 'Tip of the Tongue' for Older Adults
sciencedaily.com - 6-17-12
Has your memory failed you today, such as struggling to recall a word that's "on the tip of your tongue?" If so, you're not alone.
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Genetic factors linked to gay men
upi.com - 6-16-12
Researchers in Italy suggest sexually antagonistic genetic factors in mothers may promote homosexuality in men and fertility in female relatives.
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Lifestyle counseling can prevent diabetes
upi.com - 6-16-12
Type 1 and 2 diabetes affect 26 million Americans at a cost of $200 billion a year but researchers say much of it can be prevented through lifestyle changes.
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Marijuana and the U.S. Attorney
huffingtonpost.com - 6-16-12
Two events took place in June that suggested a primer on how medical marijuana laws are working in Colorado might be appropriate. The first was an appellate court decision that the state Supreme Court declined to review.
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Tokyo Professor: Deformities in cedar trees may be from Fukushima radiation — Sex abnormalities, malformed branches (PHOTOS)
enenews.com - 6-16-12
Mori explains that some branches bear only male flowers while others bear only female flowers. But what he found in the cedar tree in Hitachinaka City was asymmetrical, malformed branches with both male and female flowers.
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Love cheats more likely to have STDs than people in open relationships... and drink is often to blame
dailymail.co.uk - 6-16-12
Love cheats are more likely to get an STD than those in an open sexual relationship, according to a study. New research has shown people who jump into bed with someone without their partner’s knowledge are unlikely to practice safe sex, with one explanation that they are more likely to have had a drink.
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How extract from poisonous Foxglove can PROTECT against high blood pressure and heart failure
dailymail.co.uk - 6-16-12
A lethal poison made from a toxic plant once used as a Victorian murder weapon could help treat millions of people with high blood pressure.
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Fat Stem Cells Grow Bone Faster And Better
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-16-12
US scientists have found a way to grow new bone using fresh, purified stem cells from fat tissue that produces better quality bone faster than conventional methods.
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How Music Benefits The Brain
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-16-12
Studies by the University Hospital San Raffaele (Milan, Italy), presented at the 22nd Meeting of the European Neurological Society (ENS) in Prague demonstrated that test persons with no musical background were not only visibly more skilled after completing two weeks of regular exercise on a piano keyboard, their brains also changed measurably.
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Parkinson's Disease - Smelling Test For Early Detection
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-16-12
Even though Parkinson's disease is incurable, nowadays doctors are able to favorably influence the course of the disease, so that patients are able to enjoy a high quality of life for many years. In order to fight against the destruction of brain cells in Parkinson's it is necessary for doctors to detect the disease early, but unfortunately only very few adequate early detection methods are available.
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Vitamin D plus calcium tied to longer life
reuters.com - 6-16-12
Older adults who take vitamin D and calcium supplements may live a bit longer than their peers, a new research review suggests.
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Alzheimer's gene 'diabetes link'
bbc.co.uk - 6-16-12
Scientists say they have identified a possible genetic link between diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.
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Parents' Fighting May Have Long-Lasting Effect on Kids
sciencedaily.com - 6-16-12
Slamming doors, shouting and stony silences between mom and dad can really scar kids emotionally, new research suggests.
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Persistence Is Learned from Fathers, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 6-16-12
When the going gets tough, the tough ought to thank their fathers. New research from Brigham Young University shows that dads are in a unique position to help their adolescent children develop persistence.
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Breast Milk Kills HIV and Blocks Its Oral Transmission in Humanized Mouse
sciencedaily.com - 6-16-12
More than 15 percent of new HIV infections occur in children. Without treatment, only 65 percent of HIV-infected children will live until their first birthday, and fewer than half will make it to the age of two. Although breastfeeding is attributed to a significant number of these infections, most breastfed infants are not infected with HIV, despite prolonged and repeated exposure.
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Cancer's Next Magic Bullet May Be Magic Shotgun
sciencedaily.com - 6-16-12
A new approach to drug design, pioneered by a group of researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and Mt. Sinai, New York, promises to help identify future drugs to fight cancer and other diseases that will be more effective and have fewer side effects.
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Higher dose of milk vitamin fights obesity
upi.com - 6-16-12
A novel form of vitamin B3 in milk given in a high dose to mice fed a fatty diet seemed to help prevent obesity, U.S. and Swiss researchers said.
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Philadelphia rated most bedbug-infested
upi.com - 6-16-12
Philadelphia took the top spot from New York as the most bedbug-infested U.S. city, officials of a pest control company said.
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Where do milk, eggs and bacon come from? One in three youths don't know
telegraph.co.uk - 6-16-12
More than a third of 16 to 23-year-olds (36%) do not know bacon comes from pigs and four in 10 (40%) failed to link milk with an image of a dairy cow, with 7% linking it to wheat, the poll of 2,000 people for charity Leaf (Linking Environment and Farming) found.
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Use Breathing to Improve Your Health
botanical.com - 6-16-12
Our breathing is a core element of our body’s functioning, yet we only rarely think about it. Because inhaling and exhaling are so automatic, these activities that we perform tens of thousands of times every day barely register in our minds. Yet the fact that breathing is so automatic does not necessarily mean that we do it correctly. In fact, many of us have poor breathing habits, and these habits can negatively affect our health and prevent us from functioning at 100%.
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Fatherhood could alter men's behavior
usatoday.com - 6-15-12
Keith Liadis, 29, is an outdoorsy, adventurous guy who spent part of Memorial Day weekend cliff jumping with friends. "I'm kind of a risk-taker," he says. But this mechanical engineer from Bedford, N.H., is also a married father of 1-year-old Ella, and he says being a dad has tempered his outlook.
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Stress levels increased since 1983, new analysis shows
usatoday.com - 6-15-12
You may have felt it, but now a scientific analysis of stress over time offers some proof that there's more stress in people's lives today than 25 years ago.
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Virus could wipe out cancer with double blow by killing tumour cells while triggering immune system
dailymail.co.uk - 6-15-12
A bug that normally gives children the sniffles could help fight cancer. Researchers are hopeful that reovirus, which usually causes mild colds or stomach upsets, has the power to shrink tumours. The virus, which would be given to outpatients through a drip, could be used in future to fight diseases including skin and breast cancer.
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Strange reason for newborns' positive pot test found
msnbc.msn.com - 6-15-12
Certain soaps used to wash babies shortly after birth may cause the baby to test positive for marijuana on some newborn screening tests, a new study suggests.
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NHS (UK) Has Lowest Satisfaction Rate Ever
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-15-12
The British Social Attitudes Survey published by The King's Fund revealed that public satisfaction with the way the NHS runs has dropped from 70% in 2010 to 58% in 2011.
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What Is Male Candidiasis (Male Thrush)? What Is Penile Yeast Infection?
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-15-12
Candidiasis, also known as thrush, candidosis, moniliasis, and oidiomycosis, is a mycosis (fungal infections) caused by Candida albicans, one of the Candida species (all yeast). Candidiasis can occur in various parts of the body, including the male or female genital area. Thrush infections are relatively common in women and men. This article focuses on male thrush (penile yeast infection). Informally, male thrush is known as "jock itch".
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Harmful Bacteria Live In Healthy Bodies Without Causing Disease
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-15-12
Scientists working on a huge project that has mapped all the different microbes that live in and on a healthy human body have made a number of remarkable discoveries, including the fact that harmful bacteria can live in healthy bodies and co-exist with their host and other microbes without causing disease.
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Does obesity affect school performance?
cnn.com - 6-15-12
Obese children and teenagers face a slew of potential health problems as they get older, including an increased risk of diabetes, heart attacks, and certain cancers. As if that weren't enough, obesity may harm young people's long-term college and career prospects, too.
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Insight: Top heart doctors fret over new blood thinners
reuters.com - 6-15-12
For millions of heart patients, a pair of new blood thinners have been heralded as the first replacements in 60 years for warfarin, a pill whose hardships and risks have deterred many from using the stroke-prevention medicine.
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Milk with more fat may help weight loss
upi.com - 6-15-12
Many nutritionists argue the fat in a moderate portion of whole milk or 2 percent milk makes many feel fuller and reduce food cravings, a U.S. food expert says.
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Ten-year-old girl gets vein grown from her stem cells
bbc.co.uk - 6-15-12
A 10-year-old girl has had a major blood vessel in her body replaced with one grown with her own stem cells, Swedish doctors report.
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Human Breast Milk May Block HIV, Mouse Study Finds
healthday.com - 6-15-12
Human breast milk seems to kill HIV and block its oral (through the mouth) transmission, according to a new study conducted in mice.
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Mom's Smoking Tied to Dangerous Gut Illness in Preemies
healthday.com - 6-15-12
Mothers who smoke while pregnant may raise the risk that, if born prematurely, their babies will develop a serious and perhaps life-threatening bowel disease known as "necrotizing enterocolitis," a small new study has found.
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Environmental Factors Spread Obesity, Study Shows
sciencedaily.com - 6-15-12
An international team of researchers' study of the spatial patterns of the spread of obesity suggests America's bulging waistlines may have more to do with collective behavior than genetics or individual choices. The team, led by City College of New York physicist Hernán Makse, found correlations between the epidemic's geography and food marketing and distribution patterns.
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Soft Drink Consumption Not the Major Contributor to Childhood Obesity, Study Says
sciencedaily.com - 6-15-12
Most children and youth who consume soft drinks and other sweetened beverages, such as fruit punch and lemonade, are not at any higher risk for obesity than their peers who drink healthy beverages, says a new study published in the October issue of Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism. The study examined the relationship between beverage intake patterns of Canadian children and their risk for obesity and found sweetened beverage intake to be a risk factor only in boys aged 6-11.
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10,000 germ species live in and on healthy people
hosted.ap.org - 6-15-12
They live on your skin, up your nose, in your gut - enough bacteria, fungi and other microbes that collected together could weigh, amazingly, a few pounds.
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Dad's rejection may hurt more than mom's
upi.com - 6-14-12
Parental rejection and acceptance helps shape children's personalities but a father's rejection may be more painful than a mother's, U.S. researchers say.
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Loss, even financial, can blur reality
upi.com - 6-14-12
Loss, including financial loss, can compromise early perceptions and interfere with one's grasp of the truth of a situation, U.S. researchers say.
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MRIs have quadrupled since 1996
upi.com - 6-14-12
Medical imaging is increasing, even in health maintenance organization systems, which have no financial incentive to conduct MRIs, U.S. researchers say.
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Blindness breakthrough as scientists turn stem cells into tissue that allows humans to see
dailymail.co.uk - 6-14-12
Scientists have taken a major step towards restoring vision for blind people with the help of stem cells. Human-derived stem cells can spontaneously form the tissue that develops into the part of the eye which allows us to see, according to a new study. Researchers say transplantation of this tissue in the future could help patients with visual impairments see clearly.
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Arthritis breakthrough 'could stop crippling condition before it starts'
dailymail.co.uk - 6-14-12
A breakthrough in our understanding of how rheumatoid arthritis develops could help scientists spot those at risk and even stop the condition before it starts. Researchers have found that billions of bugs in our guts play a role in regulating the immune system.
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Why the 'early bird' is happier and healthier in life
telegraph.co.uk - 6-14-12
People who get up earlier in the morning are the happiest, according to a new study which appears to prove the old saying that the “early bid catches the worm”.
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Poor now twice as likely to die from heart disease as rich
telegraph.co.uk - 6-14-12
Rising obesity rates among the poor mean they are now almost twice as likely to die from heart disease as the well off, academics are warning.
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MRI, CT scan use spikes, study finds. Should we be worried?
msnbc.msn.com - 6-14-12
The latest medical images can provide spectacular pictures, giving doctors and patients enormous amounts of information about a wide range of medical conditions. But doctors may have gotten overly enthusiastic about using them.
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Cough Relief With Sucrose And Menthol
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-14-12
Millions of Americans reach for their cough drops or syrup at the first sign of a cough. However, scientists are unsure if and how these popular remedies work. Now, new findings from the Monell Center suggest that sucrose and menthol, ingredients commonly regarded as flavorings in these preparations, each act independently to reduce coughing.
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From Infection To Inflammation To Cancer: Scientists Offer New Clues
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-14-12
Chronic inflammation of the liver, stomach or colon, often as a result of infection by viruses and bacteria, is one of the biggest risk factors for cancer of these organs. Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the US have been researching this for over three decades, and now in a new paper published online this week they offer the most comprehensive clues so far about the potential underlying molecular mechanisms.
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Vitamin D - How Much Is Too Much?
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-14-12
Vitamin D is vital for absorbing and maintaining calcium levels in the body, and therefore reducing the risk of fractures from falls and broken hips. Vitamin D is also beneficial for fighting cardiac disease, depression and various types of cancers and although scientists are aware of the fact that a Vitamin D deficiency is unhealthy, new research has now revealed that excessive Vitamin D levels are also unhealthy. According to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, researchers from the University of Copenhagen support the benefits of vitamin D in terms of mortality risk.
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Female Hormones Impact On Gum Disease Risk
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-14-12
Women need to take better care of their teeth and gums than men, according to a comprehensive review of women's health studies.
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Seaweed supplement may aid weight loss: study
reuters.com - 6-14-12
A seaweed-based fiber supplement, taken daily before meals, helped people lose weight in a new study.
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'Hitchhiking' anti-cancer viruses ride blood cells
bbc.co.uk - 6-14-12
A tumour-killing virus can sneak around the body by "hitchhiking" on the back of blood cells, researchers have shown.
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Fertility Treatment Tied to Higher Relapse Rate in Women With MS
healthday.com - 6-14-12
Women with multiple sclerosis (MS) who undergo in vitro fertilization therapy are more likely to suffer a relapse of their MS condition, according to the results of a small new study.
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Mouse Study Suggests Certain Fats Could Trigger Crohn's, Colitis
healthday.com - 6-14-12
Certain types of saturated fats common in today's Western diet may change gut bacteria and trigger inflammatory bowel disease in people genetically predisposed to the disorder, according to a new study that looked at this relationship in mice.
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Plague Rare in U.S., Surfacing in More Affluent Areas
healthday.com - 6-14-12
Although the plague is typically considered a remnant of the Middle Ages, when unsanitary conditions and rodent infestations prevailed amid the squalor of poverty, this rare but deadly disease appears to be spreading through wealthier communities in New Mexico, researchers report.
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Unhealthy Lifestyles Have Little Impact On Sperm Quality
sciencedaily.com - 6-14-12
Lifestyle advice given by doctors to men diagnosed with infertility should be radically overhauled according to research published June 13.
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Obesity, Depression Found to Be Root Causes of Daytime Sleepiness
sciencedaily.com - 6-14-12
Wake up, America, and lose some weight -- it's keeping you tired and prone to accidents. Three studies being presented June 13 at sleep 2012 conclude that obesity and depression are the two main culprits making us excessively sleepy while awake.
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Insulin has no effect on heart attack risk
upi.com - 6-14-12
Daily insulin injection, begun early with type 2 diabetes, neither increased nor reduced heart attack, stroke or cancer risk, Canadian researchers said.
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Natural 'marijuana' in brain eases anxiety
upi.com - 6-14-12
U.S. researchers said they found a way to calm the fears of anxious mice with a drug that alters their brain chemistry.
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Cut breast cancer risk by avoiding scans
upi.com - 6-14-12
An analysis of environmental causes of breast cancer suggests women can reduce breast cancer risk by avoiding unnecessary medical imaging, researchers say.
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Survey: 75 percent say a tan is healthy
upi.com - 6-14-12
Almost three-quarters of U.S. adults ages 18-29 years agreed with the statement, "Sun exposure is good for your health," a survey indicated.
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Trying to quit smoking? Eat produce
upi.com - 6-13-12
Eating more fruit and vegetables may help smokers who want to quit and stay tobacco-free for longer, U.S. researchers say.
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Statins linked to fatigue, low energy
upi.com - 6-13-12
U.S. researchers said statins -- drugs that lower cholesterol -- may leave some patients fatigued and/or exhausted while exercising.
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Poor brushing of teeth linked to premature cancer deaths as bacteria increase risk by up to 80%
dailymail.co.uk - 6-13-12
Failing to brush your teeth properly could increase the risk of dying prematurely from cancer, researchers claim. They found a link between high levels of dental plaque, or bacteria, and dying from cancer up to 13 years earlier than might otherwise be expected. Those with the most bacteria on the surface of their teeth and gums had an 80 per cent increased risk of premature death.
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Why meditation helps you focus: Mindfulness improves brain wiring in just a month
dailymail.co.uk - 6-13-12
Just a month of meditation training alters brain wiring in ways that could open the door to new treatments for mental disorders, research has shown. Scientists looked at the effects of integrative body-mind training (IBMT) on two groups of university students. After just four weeks, or 11 hours, of training scans showed physical changes in the brains of the volunteers.
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Researchers criticize new study questioning same-sex parenting
msnbc.msn.com - 6-13-12
A new study claiming to find disadvantages for children raised by same-sex parents is attracting criticism from social scientists, who say that the research does not actually address how well gay and lesbians parent.
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Why did that weird dot just float across my eye?
msnbc.msn.com - 6-13-12
You’re staring at your blank computer screen when dots drift into your line of vision. They resemble specks of dust or perhaps clouds or cobwebs. Don’t panic -- you’re not seeing things. You’re witnessing eye floaters, not tricks of the eye or mind.
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Alzheimer's Onset Linked To Signs Of Stress, Grief And Sorrow
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-13-12
Hypertension, diabetes, advanced age or a mentally and physically inactive lifestyle are known to increase an individuals risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, the most prevalent form of dementia in the world. Now, researchers in Argentina say that stress may possibly trigger the disease.
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Eating More Veggies And Doing More Exercise Works Wonders
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-13-12
A new Northwestern Medicine study reveals that just by simply spending less time on the sofa means not as much time is spent eating sweets. The study, published in Archives of Internal Medicine, demonstrates that changing just one bad habit has a domino effect on others.
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Happiness Is Significantly Affected By Neuroticism
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-13-12
Having more money does not necessarily lead to happiness, especially if the person is neurotic,
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Right-to-die movement sees gains as world ages
reuters.com - 6-13-12
Right-to-die activists hope more countries will allow assisted suicide or euthanasia in coming years as the world population ages, but opponents are determined to stop them, a dispute that flared ahead of competing conferences in Switzerland.
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Some insomnia may be fear of the dark
upi.com - 6-13-12
A study involving college students found half who reported having poor sleep also reported a fear of the dark, researchers in Canada said.
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Longer with diabetes, more risk of stroke
upi.com - 6-13-12
The risk of stroke among people with diabetes rises depending on how long they have the disease, U.S. researchers found.
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Diesel exhausts do cause cancer, says WHO
bbc.co.uk - 6-13-12
Exhaust fumes from diesel engines do cause cancer, a panel of experts working for the World Health Organization says.
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Children with older fathers and grandfathers 'live longer'
bbc.co.uk - 6-13-12
Delaying fatherhood may offer survival advantages, say US scientists who have found children with older fathers and grandfathers appear to be "genetically programmed" to live longer.
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Heavy Drinking, Smoking Won't Harm Men's Sperm: Study
healthday.com - 6-13-12
When a man drinks to excess, smokes or otherwise behaves unhealthily, it probably won't damage his sperm, a new British study contends.
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Older Women Should Not Take Calcium, Vitamin D: Task Force
healthday.com - 6-13-12
A leading U.S. government advisory panel has proposed that postmenopausal women not take low-dose calcium and vitamin D supplements daily to ward off bone fractures.
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Huge Rise in CT, MRI, Ultrasound Scan Use: Study
healthday.com - 6-13-12
The number of advanced diagnostic scans, such as CTs and MRIs, has zoomed upward since 1996, greatly boosting the amount of estimated radiation that patients receive, according to a new analysis of the medical records of millions of Americans in HMO health plans.
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When Being Scared Twice Is Enough to Remember
sciencedaily.com - 6-13-12
One of the brain's jobs is to help us figure out what's important enough to be remembered. Scientists at Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University have achieved some insight into how fleeting experiences become memories in the brain.
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Nature or Nurture? It May Depend On Where You Live
sciencedaily.com - 6-13-12
In a study published June 12 in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, researchers from the Twins Early Development Study at King's College London's Institute of Psychiatry studied data from more than 6700 families relating to 45 childhood characteristics, from IQ and hyperactivity to height and weight. They found that genetic and environmental contributions to these characteristics vary geographically in the UK and have published their results online as a series of nature-nurture maps.
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Early Gut Bacteria Regulate Happiness
sciencedaily.com - 6-13-12
UCC scientists have shown that brain levels of serotonin, the 'happy hormone' are regulated by the amount of bacteria in the gut during early life. Their research is being published June 12 in the international psychiatry journal, Molecular Psychiatry.
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Teens Taking ADHD Drugs to Get Good Grades: How Big a Problem Is It?
time.com - 6-12-12
Students have been taking stimulants to get ahead since the 1930s. Is there any reason to believe the problem is bigger today than ever before?
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From air filters and vacuums to nose drops and acupuncture, a guide to the hayfever remedies that REALLY work
dailymail.co.uk - 6-12-12
A doctor, a homeopath and a sufferer recommend treatments for a condition that brings misery to millions every summer. Their suggestions differ but there's one remedy they all agree on...
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How the man cured of AIDS has inspired doctors to discover revolutionary new treatment
dailymail.co.uk - 6-12-12
Timothy Brown, 46, became the first person in history to be cured of HIV after receiving a blood stem cell transplant from a person resistant to the virus.
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Poisoned by plastic: Chemicals in water bottles and food packaging have been linked to infertility and birth defects. Scaremongering, or the truth?
dailymail.co.uk - 6-12-12
When Juliette Scarfe invites you to potter about the kitchen of her home in South London, you fail to notice anything odd at first - and then it dawns on you. It is a completely plastic-free zone.
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People with rare natural ability to fight AIDS virus have potent 'killer' cells that recognise and destroy infection
dailymail.co.uk - 6-12-12
It has long been known that a tiny minority of people infected with HIV have a natural ability to fight off the deadly AIDS virus. Scientists said they are now a step closer to understanding why.
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Atkins diet 'raises risk of heart disease ' because of a surge in cholesterol levels
dailymail.co.uk - 6-12-12
The popular Atkins diet could be putting people at increased risk of heart disease, according to a 25-year study. Researchers from Sweden found the introduction of the low-carbohydrate regime led to a surge in saturated fat intake in 2004, with a spike in cholesterol levels three years later.
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Too little sleep? Stroke risk spikes in healthy adults
msnbc.msn.com - 6-12-12
Attention, busy middle-aged folks. You may be healthy and thin, but if you habitually sleep less than six hours a night, you still could be boosting your risk of a stroke.
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We are more likely to die on our birthday than any other day
telegraph.co.uk - 6-12-12
Researchers who studied more than two million people over 40 years found a rise in deaths from heart attacks, strokes, falls and suicides.
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Cutting compulsion affects kids as young as 7, study finds
msnbc.msn.com - 6-12-12
The Tacoma, Wash., mom knew something was up with her 11-year-old daughter when the girl kept leaving school with stomach aches that disappeared as soon as she got home. But she didn't know how bad things had gotten until the school called one day two years ago to tell her the sixth grader was sobbing and threatening to hurt herself.
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Is Exercise "Useless" In Treating Depression?
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-12-12
The publication of a new study in the BMJ on 6 June triggered a flurry of headlines suggesting that "exercise doesn't help depression". However, reducing the study's specific, detailed findings to a media-friendly sound bite has run the risk of misleading people, because the researchers did not set out to test the effect of exercise on depression.
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Do Women Have A Higher Risk Of Stroke Than Men? Probably
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-12-12
According to a study in British Medical Journal (BMJ), the risk of women suffering a stroke in comparison with men is moderately higher. The study suggests that doctors should consider a patient's gender when deciding on anti-clotting treatments.
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What is histrionic personality disorder?
cnn.com - 6-12-12
The trial of Jerry Sandusky has begun. Prosecutors accuse the former Penn State assistant football coach of abusing at least 10 boys, allegations that have become widely known.
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Stop that splitting headache
cnn.com - 6-12-12
About once a month, usually around my period, I start feeling sort of... off. My neck gets tight and achy, and I can't think as clearly as usual, like my mental gears are gummed up.
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Do statins drain your energy?
reuters.com - 6-12-12
The popular cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins might take a toll on people's energy levels, a new study suggests.
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Expectations influences outcomes
upi.com - 6-12-12
Suggestion -- a rabbit's foot or a lucky coin -- can influence how people perform on learning and memory tasks, New Zealand and U.S researchers said.
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Sleep loss increases anxiety in anxious
upi.com - 6-12-12
Sleep loss exaggerates the degree to which people anticipate impending emotional events, particularly among those highly anxious, U.S. researchers say.
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People 'taking more food risks'
bbc.co.uk - 6-12-12
People are taking more risks with their food as finances become tighter, a Food Standards Agency survey suggests.
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Low Levels of Brain Chemical May Boost Aggression
healthday.com - 6-12-12
People with lower levels of the brain chemical dopamine are more likely to be highly aggressive in competitive situations, a small new study indicates.
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Thyroid Cancer Seldom Shortens Lifespan, Study Finds
healthday.com - 6-12-12
Most people with thyroid cancer live as long as people who don't have the disease, a new study finds. Patients with advanced thyroid cancer are the exception.
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No Cancer Risk From Long-Acting Insulin: Studies
healthday.com - 6-12-12
Three studies should squelch fears that taking a form of insulin called insulin glargine (Lantus) increases the risk of cancer, researchers say.
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Diabetes Drug Metformin May Cut Breast Cancer Risk in Older Women
healthday.com - 6-12-12
A widely prescribed drug, metformin, may lower the risk of invasive breast cancer in postmenopausal women with diabetes, a new study indicates.
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Quitting Smoking Even in Old Age Prolongs Life: Study
healthday.com - 6-12-12
There's yet more evidence that smoking cuts life expectancy, with a new study that finds the habit increases the risk of early death from all causes among older smokers.
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New Stroke Treatment Could Prevent and Reduce Brain Damage
sciencedaily.com - 6-12-12
Researchers at the University of Missouri have demonstrated the effectiveness of a potential new therapy for stroke patients in an article published in the journal Molecular Neurodegeneration. Created to target a specific enzyme known to affect important brain functions, the new compound being studied at MU is designed to stop the spread of brain bleeds and protect brain cells from further damage in the crucial hours after a stroke.
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Long-Ignored Enzyme Turns out to Be Key to Killing Infectious Bacteria
sciencedaily.com - 6-12-12
New research shows that an enzyme that has long been considered relatively useless to the immune response instead has an important role in setting up immune cells to kill infection-causing bacteria.
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TEPCO seeks to reduce groundwater flowing into reactor buildings
mainichi.jp - 6-11-12
The operator of the crisis-hit Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant said Monday it aims to halve the amount of groundwater flowing into the reactor buildings by building about a dozen pumping wells.
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FUKUSHIMA: Pacific Ocean Will Not Dilute Dumped Radioactive Water
globalresearch.ca - 6-11-12
The operator of the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant has been dumping something like a thousand tons per day of radioactive water into the Pacific ocean. Remember, the reactors are “riddled with meltdown holes”, building 4 – with more radiation than all nuclear bombs ever dropped or tested – is missing entire walls, and building 3 is a pile of rubble. The whole complex is leaking like a sieve, and the rivers of water pumped into the reactors every day are just pouring into the ocean (with only a slight delay).
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African sleeping sickness shrouded in superstition
ca.news.yahoo.com - 6-11-12
A frail 65-year-old woman sitting under the mango trees in a rural village in Chad suffers from a tropical disease that eats into the brain, and the locals blame on witchcraft.
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The facts behind benign brain tumors
usatoday.com - 6-11-12
Singer Sheryl Crow's news that she has been diagnosed with a meningioma, the most common kind of benign brain tumor, has raised a lot of questions for readers. USA TODAY asked Anders Cohen, chief of neurosurgery and spine surgery at The Brooklyn Hospital Center in New York, to answer a few of them.
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What Is Anabolic Steroid Abuse?
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-11-12
Anabolic steroids, also technically known as anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) have existed since the 1930´s. They are regarded as prescription-only synthetic substance medications that imitate the effects of the male hormone called testosterone.
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Database Of More Than 1 Million Diverse Diabetes Patients Used To Find Better Treatment & Prevention Strategies
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-11-12
Eleven integrated health systems, with more than 16 million members, have combined de-identified data from their electronic health records to form the largest, most comprehensive private-sector diabetes registry in the nation.
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10 shocking medical mistakes
cnn.com - 6-11-12
When you're a patient, you trust you're in good hands, but even the best doctor or nurse can make a mistake on you or someone you love.
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Poll: 'Sugary drinks' part of U.S. culture
upi.com - 6-11-12
Many respondents to a U.S. survey on sweet beverages said drinking "sugary drinks" was a part of all-American culture.
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Aggressive pre-diabetes approach needed, say researchers
bbc.co.uk - 6-11-12
An "early and aggressive" approach to people on the cusp of developing Type 2 diabetes is justified to reduce cases of the disease, a study suggests.
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Study Digs Into Secrets of Keeping HIV in Check
healthday.com - 6-11-12
A small number of HIV-infected patients have immune systems that are able to keep AIDS at bay by preventing the virus from reproducing for years, and researchers are reporting that they've gained new insight into how that works.
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Junk Food More Appealing When You're Sleepy: Study
healthday.com - 6-11-12
Unhealthy foods, such as sweets and chips, are more appealing to people who haven't had enough sleep, new research suggests.
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Diabetes Rising Rapidly Among U.S. Kids
healthday.com - 6-11-12
Diabetes is increasing among U.S. children at an alarming rate, say researchers who report jumps of more than 20 percent since 2001 for type 2 disease, which is linked to excessive weight and sedentary lifestyles, and type 1 diabetes, which is an autoimmune disease.
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New Insight Into Placental Growth and Healthy Pregnancy
sciencedaily.com - 6-11-12
Scientists at the Babraham Institute have gained a new understanding of how the growth of the placenta is regulated before birth, which has important implications for a healthy pregnancy. The research, published June 10 in the journal Nature Cell Biology shows that the controlled release of a specific molecule, called miR-675, slows down growth of the placenta before birth.
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Anthropologists Finds High Levels of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Breast Milk of Amerindian Women
sciencedaily.com - 6-11-12
Working with researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and the Cincinnati Children's Hospital, anthropologists at UC Santa Barbara have found high levels of beneficial omega-3 fatty acids in the breast milk of economically impoverished Amerindian woman as compared to women in the United States.
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Overwhelming Evidence of Hidden Heart Disease in Hypertensive African-Americans
sciencedaily.com - 6-11-12
A Wayne State University School of Medicine study has found that an overwhelming majority of African-American patients with hypertension also suffered hidden heart disease caused by high blood pressure even though they displayed no symptoms.
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Kids can get hand, foot and mouth disease
upi.com - 6-10-12
Children can't get hoof and mouth disease -- that's a disease of livestock -- but they can get something that sounds similar, U.S. health officials said.
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How the man cured of AIDS has inspired doctors to discover revolutionary new treatment
dailymail.co.uk - 6-10-12
Timothy Brown, 46, became the first person in history to be cured of HIV after receiving a blood stem cell transplant from a person resistant to the virus. In 2007 doctors made the breakthrough surgery as they treated Brown for the leukemia that he had been diagnosed with a year earlier. And now doctors are one step closer to emulating the success of Brown's surgery to help the estimated 34 million people worldwide who are HIV positive.
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Operation to treat prostate cancer in only half an hour is revealed... and it's available on the NHS
dailymail.co.uk - 6-10-12
A gentler form of prostate cancer treatment that takes only 30 minutes has been devised by British surgeons. The technique is just as effective as surgery but is cheaper and has fewer side effects. This means men are back on their feet and back at work sooner and are much less likely to suffer problems such as impotence and incontinence.
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Diabetes Rising Rapidly Among U.S. Kids
healthday.com - 6-10-12
Diabetes is increasing among U.S. children at an alarming rate, say researchers who report jumps of more than 20 percent since 2001 for type 2 disease, which is linked to excessive weight and sedentary lifestyles, and type 1 diabetes, which is an autoimmune disease.
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Treating Prediabetes Might Prevent Full-Blown Disease
healthday.com - 6-10-12
Treating prediabetes aggressively with lifestyle changes and medications may prevent its progression to diabetes, a new study finds.
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Many People With Type 1 Diabetes Missing Treatment Goals: Study
healthday.com - 6-10-12
Many Americans with type 1 diabetes fail to meet their treatment targets, according to researchers who analyzed data from a newly created registry that includes more than 25,000 patients at 67 clinics nationwide.
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Ways to reduce traveling blood clot risk
upi.com - 6-10-12
People who have to sit for long periods, such as on long flights, can take steps to reduce the risk of deep vein thrombosis, a U.S. physician says.
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More U.S. teens smoke pot than cigarettes
upi.com - 6-10-12
Marijuana use is more common among U.S. high school students than cigarette smoking -- 23 percent to 18 percent, federal officials say.
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U.S.: Some vaccines stored improperly
upi.com - 6-9-12
Some vaccines stored in offices that provide free immunizations were stored improperly or at inappropriate temperatures, U.S. health investigators said.
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Gum disease linked to knee pain
upi.com - 6-9-12
People who ignore gum disease may end up having knew trouble, U.S. researchers discovered.
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Report: 16 percent of US teens have considered suicide
msnbc.msn.com - 6-9-12
Nearly 16 percent of high school teens nationwide admitted they had considered suicide within the previous year, according to an annual survey published Thursday by The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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Head injury turns man into musical savant
msnbc.msn.com - 6-9-12
When Derek Amato crashed headfirst into the hard bottom of a pool, he was scared about what he might have done to his brain. But amazingly the fallout from that accident wasn’t all bad. Along with the headaches and other post-concussion symptoms, the accident brought Amato an unexpected gift: it turned him into a musical savant.
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More U.S. teens diagnosed with kidney stones
msnbc.msn.com - 6-9-12
More teenagers are being diagnosed with kidney stones now than in years past, a study from one U.S. state suggests.
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Fish Oil Prevents Age-Related Loss Of Vision
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-9-12
Loss of vision due to age can potentially be prevented by DHA, an omega-3 fatty acid found in fish. The study, which was recently published in the peer-reviewed journal Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science demonstrated that lab models fed with DHA did not accumulate the toxic molecule that usually builds up in the retina with age and therefore preventing age-related loss of vision.
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Girls With Anxiety Have Harder Working Brains
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-9-12
Researchers at Michigan State University have found that brains of anxious girls work significantly harder than brains of boys when put in stressful situations. The study is published in the International Journal of Psychophysiology.
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Can TV Undermine Self-Esteem In Children? Sometimes
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-9-12
Whether watching TV has a positive or negative impact on children depends on their gender and race. A new study published in Communication Research reveals that in the long run, watching TV can make white and black girl or black boys feel worse about themselves, whilst the opposite is true for white boys.
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E. coli outbreak sickens 14 in six states
cnn.com - 6-9-12
Federal health officials say 14 people in six states have been sickened by the same strain of E. coli over the past couple of months.
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Study: Dogs show empathy to crying people
upi.com - 6-9-12
Dogs respond to a person who is crying regardless of whether it is their owner or an unfamiliar person, researchers in Britain found.
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Genome of 18-week-old foetus deciphered
bbc.co.uk - 6-9-12
A blood sample from mum and saliva from dad have been used to sequence the genome of a foetus in the womb, by US researchers.
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Enter the 'Brotox' Era
healthday.com - 6-9-12
The public's common image of a Botox patient is a middle-aged woman hoping to look more youthful through the minimally invasive procedure.
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Menopausal Age May Affect Rheumatoid Arthritis Severity
healthday.com - 6-9-12
Women who experience early menopause have a reduced risk of developing a severe form of rheumatoid arthritis, a new study suggests.
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Docs Aren't Coaching Overweight Kids on How to Slim Down: Study
healthday.com - 6-9-12
While U.S. doctors often urge obese teens to eat better and exercise more, overweight kids headed for obesity seldom get the same medical advice, a new study shows.
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Poisoning 'Can Happen to Anyone'
healthday.com - 6-9-12
It's easy to think that a poisoning won't happen to you or someone you love, especially if you've taken precautions like locking up your cleaning products and other chemicals.
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City Kids More Likely to Have Food Allergies Than Rural Ones: Population Density Is Key Factor, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 6-9-12
Children living in urban centers have a much higher prevalence of food allergies than those living in rural areas, according to a new study, which is the first to map children's food allergies by geographical location in the United States. In particular, kids in big cities are more than twice as likely to have peanut and shellfish allergies compared to rural communities.
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Pregnancy: Why Mother's Immune System Does Not Reject Developing Fetus as Foreign Tissue
sciencedaily.com - 6-9-12
Researchers at NYU School of Medicine have made an important discovery that partially answers the long-standing question of why a mother's immune system does not reject a developing fetus as foreign tissue.
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Oxytocin – Can It Treat Shyness?
botanical.com - 6-9-12
Oxytocin is a natural hormone that is best known for controlling contractions during labour. Recently, scientists have discovered that it has other significant roles such as in the human urge to connect with others.
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Women should be tested for Chlamydia
upi.com - 6-8-12
Sexually active women age 25 and younger should be tested for the sexually transmitted disease Chlamydia every year, U.S. health officials advise.
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Kids can get hand, foot and mouth disease
upi.com - 6-8-12
Children can't get hoof and mouth disease -- that's a disease of livestock -- but they can get something that sounds similar, U.S. health officials said.
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Genetic screening of unborn babies 'may be inaccurate'
telegraph.co.uk - 6-8-12
New tests for genetic screening of unborn babies will not be 100 per cent accurate and may scare parents into believing their children will be born with a disability when they are healthy, Lord Robert Winston warns.
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How worrying takes its toll on a woman's brain... because they have to work harder to perform simple tasks than men
dailymail.co.uk - 6-8-12
If you’re one of those women with a tendency to fret, here’s something else to start worrying about. Women who are worriers have to work harder to perform simple tasks than men, and make more mistakes on difficult ones, researchers claim.
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Autism 'could be triggered by very low doses of anti-depressants or other chemicals found in water supply'
dailymail.co.uk - 6-8-12
Autism in genetically vulnerable people could be triggered by very low levels of chemicals found in the water supply, researchers have discovered.
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Tears of a teacher in a coma as his fiancee phones him from Bali: After ten months, her voice triggers the first signs of life
dailymail.co.uk - 6-8-12
For ten months, he had been lying in a hospital bed, unconscious and unresponsive. The injuries Mathew Taylor had suffered in a motorbike crash were so severe that his devastated family were warned he may never wake up. But then came the phone call that would change everything. From her home in Bali 7,000 miles away, Mr Taylor’s fiancee Handayani Nurul chatted to him – and at the sound of her voice, tears began trickling down his cheek.
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Prisoners using antibiotic ointment as hair gel -- why that's worrisome
msnbc.msn.com - 6-8-12
We've all had those fuzzy mornings where we've nearly brushed our teeth with Neosporin, but a new study presented at an annual meeting of epidemiologists has found that prison inmates are purposefully misusing over-the-counter topical antibiotics as grooming aids.
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Blood Test In Early Stage Breast Cancer May Predict Recurrence And Survival
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-8-12
Testing the blood of early stage breast cancer patients for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) may predict their chance for recurrence and survival, and help identify which ones may need additional treatment, according to a new study published on Wednesday. However, the findings need to be confirmed by larger trials before such a method can be considered for clinical use.
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10% Of TB Cases In China Are Drug-Resistant Strains
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-8-12
Drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) in China makes up about 1 in every 10 new cases, according to a report based on data from China's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and published in NEJM (New England Journal of Medicine). Experts say that more rapid testing of the estimated 9 million infected individuals each year globally is crucial. In China alone, there are at least 1 million new infections annually.
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Industrial And Natural Trans Fats Impact On Health - New Insights
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-8-12
Researchers in Canada have gained new insights into the how different types of trans fats impact health. Their findings add to new knowledge on a special 'family' of natural trans fats that are produced by animals, such as sheep, goats, and cattle, and found in the milk and meat from these animals.
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Visual Perception Improved With Magnetic Stimulation
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-8-12
Researchers have successfully improved the visual perception of a group of healthy individuals by using a non-invasive technique called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The study, led by Antoni Valero-Cabré from the Centre de Recherche de l'Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle Epinière (CNRS / Inserm / UPMC), is published in the journal PLoS ONE.
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Alzheimer's vaccine in humans promising
upi.com - 6-8-12
In a second clinical trial on humans, a vaccine against Alzheimer's disease was 80 percent effective, researchers in Sweden said.
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CT scans on children 'could triple brain cancer risk'
bbc.co.uk - 6-8-12
Multiple CT scans in childhood can triple the risk of developing brain cancer or leukaemia, a study suggests.
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Genome of 18-week-old foetus deciphered
bbc.co.uk - 6-8-12
A blood sample from mum and saliva from dad have been used to sequence the genome of a foetus in the womb, by US researchers.
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Most 'Extreme Preemies' Grow Into Happy, Healthy Teens
healthday.com - 6-8-12
The tiniest, most underweight babies emerge as teens who feel good about themselves, rating their health about the same as children born at normal weights, according to a new study.
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Ritual in Some Jewish Circumcisions Raises Risk of Herpes Infection: Report
healthday.com - 6-8-12
The practice of "oral-genital suction" performed during some Orthodox Jewish circumcision ceremonies could leave the infant with a potentially fatal herpes virus infection, health officials warn.
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Many Suffer Leg, Lung Clots While Hospitalized: CDC
healthday.com - 6-8-12
Hospitalization is a major risk factor for a potentially deadly blood clot and increased public health efforts are needed to reduce this risk, a new federal report says.
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U.S. in Top 10 for Premature Births
healthday.com - 6-8-12
The United States is among the 10 countries with the highest number of premature births, according to a new study.
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Skin Cells Reprogrammed Into Brain Cells
sciencedaily.com - 6-8-12
Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have for the first time transformed skin cells -- with a single genetic factor -- into cells that develop on their own into an interconnected, functional network of brain cells. The research offers new hope in the fight against many neurological conditions because scientists expect that such a transformation -- or reprogramming -- of cells may lead to better models for testing drugs for devastating neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease.
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One-in-29 in Americans suffer from PTSD
upi.com - 6-8-12
Post-traumatic stress disorder affects 1-in-29 Americans, including combat veterans, first responders, abuse victims and disaster survivors, U.S. officials say.
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A Radioactive Nightmare
vcreporter.com - 6-8-12
Millions of Southern Californians and tourists seek the region’s famous beaches to cool off in the sea breeze and frolic in the surf. Those iconic breezes, however, may be delivering something hotter than the white sands along the Pacific.
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Only 1 antibiotic left to treat gonorrhea
upi.com - 6-7-12
Only one antibiotic remains that can treat gonorrhea, officials at the World Health Organization officials in Geneva, Switzerland, said.
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Your Doctor May Love Yoga
rodale.com - 6-7-12
A new survey shows that complimentary and alternative medicine are gaining ground among mainstream physicians. Here's how you can benefit.
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The facts behind benign brain tumors
usatoday.com - 6-7-12
Singer Sheryl Crow's news that she has been diagnosed with a meningioma, the most common kind of benign brain tumor, has raised a lot of questions for readers. USA TODAY asked Anders Cohen, chief of neurosurgery and spine surgery at The Brooklyn Hospital Center in New York, to answer a few of them.
More...


Baby's cells may transfer to mom during pregnancy
msnbc.msn.com - 6-7-12
During pregnancy, and even decades later, a baby's influence on mom runs deep — cell deep. While the fetus develops inside the womb, its cells mix and mingle with the mother's after traveling through the placenta, and can stay there for years.
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Anxiety cranks up activity in women's brains, study suggests
msnbc.msn.com - 6-7-12
Women who worry a lot have brains that work overtime even during easy tasks, new research suggests.
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Cannabinoid Treatment For Pain In Cancer Patients
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-7-12
A new report, published in The Journal of Pain states that a multicenter trial has shown that a new cannabinoid treatment is effective in reducing pain in cancer patients who were not obtaining pain relief from opioids alone.
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Waist Size, Regardless Of BMI, Linked To Diabetes Risk
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-7-12
Waist circumference is strongly and independently linked to diabetes type two risk, even after accounting for body mass index (BMI), and should be measured more widely for estimating risk, researchers from the Medical Research Council (MRC) Epidemiology Unit, UK, reported in PLoS Medicine. The authors explained that overweight people with a large waist, over 102cm (40.2 inches) for men and over 88cm (34.6 inches) for women, have approximately the same or higher risk of eventually developing diabetes type 2 as obese individuals.
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Cellular Particles Fuse With Organs Establishing An Environment Ripe For The Spread Of Cancer
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-7-12
The fact that different types of tumors only spread to specific, preferred organs has been known to scientists for longer than a century. However, so far, research has not been able to shed light on the mechanisms of organ specific metastasis, i.e. the 1889 'soil and seed' theory. A study recently published online by Nature Medicine, could now help explain this hypothesis by proposing a new mechanism to control cancer metastasis, offering a novel diagnostic and treatment potential.
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Americans' heads have been growing, scientists say
cnn.com - 6-7-12
If you're American with an average-sized head, your noggin is likely bigger than your ancestor's was seven generations ago.
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WHO: Sexually-transmitted superbug could be major crisis
cnn.com - 6-7-12
A major public health crisis is emerging, in the form of a sexually-transmitted disease that doesn't respond to antibiotics, World Health Organization officials said Wednesday.
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Less folic acid in pregnancy tied to autism: study
reuters.com - 6-7-12
In a new study of California moms, women whose children had autism recalled getting less folic acid through food and supplements early in their pregnancies than those whose kids didn't develop the disorder.
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Medical marijuana seminars selling out
upi.com - 6-7-12
Weekend seminars on aspects of legal medical marijuana in Canada are so popular, the instructor said he's going to open a regular school in Vancouver.
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Positive attitude plays role in longevity
upi.com - 6-7-12
A positive attitude and a sense of humor might play a role in living a longer, healthier life, U.S. researchers suggested.
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Foods rich in purines quintuple gout risk
upi.com - 6-7-12
Foods rich in purines -- particularly meat and seafood -- quintuple the immediate risk of a gout flare-up, U.S. researchers found.
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IVF 'higher risk of complication'
bbc.co.uk - 6-7-12
There is a higher risk of complications and multiple births in pregnancies that result from IVF techniques, say experts.
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Exercise Controls Weight in White Girls Better Than in Black Girls: Study
healthday.com - 6-7-12
Exercise appears less likely to prevent obesity among black teenage girls than their white peers, a new study shows.
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Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Spreading: WHO
healthday.com - 6-7-12
Gonorrhea, the second most common sexually transmitted disease, is rapidly growing resistant to the last class of antibiotics that can effectively treat the infection, the World Health Organization warned Wednesday.
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Child CT Scans Might Up Risk of Brain Cancer, Leukemia
healthday.com - 6-7-12
Children who undergo CT scans of the head may raise their risk of developing brain cancer or leukemia later in life, a new study says.
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This Is Your Brain On No Self-Control
sciencedaily.com - 6-7-12
New pictures from the University of Iowa show what it looks like when a person runs out of patience and loses self-control.
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The Power of Suggestion: What We Expect Influences Our Behavior, for Better or Worse
sciencedaily.com - 6-7-12
A lucky rabbit foot. A glass of wine. A pill. What do these things all have in common? Their effects -- whether we do well on a test, whether we mingle at the cocktail party, whether we feel better -- all depend on the power of suggestion.
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Stress May Delay Brain Development in Early Years
sciencedaily.com - 6-7-12
Stress may affect brain development in children, altering growth of a specific piece of the brain and abilities associated with it, according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
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Role of Fungus in Digestive Disorders Explored
sciencedaily.com - 6-7-12
Cedars-Sinai researchers say their examination of the fungi in the intestines suggests an important link between these microbes and inflammatory diseases such as ulcerative colitis.
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Babies could be tested for 3,500 genetic faults
telegraph.co.uk - 6-7-12
Scientists could soon be able to routinely screen unborn babies for thousands of genetic conditions, raising concerns the breakthrough could lead to more abortions.
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Bad air linked to repeat heart attack
upi.com - 6-6-12
Israeli researchers say air pollution not only affects heart attack and stroke, it also causes repeated episodes in the long-term.
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Coffee/caffeine link to less dementia risk
upi.com - 6-6-12
U.S. researchers found direct evidence that caffeine/coffee intake is associated with a reduced risk of dementia or its delayed onset.
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Soy no help in postmenopausal cognition
upi.com - 6-6-12
Soy supplements provided neither positive or negative changes in overall mental abilities in postmenopausal women, U.S. researchers said.
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Centenarians' Positive Attitude Linked to Long Life
abcnews.go.com - 6-6-12
Living to very old age may be "in the genes" as the saying goes, and a recent study published in the journal Aging suggests that certain personality traits make up a major part of the mix of longevity genes.
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Brushing your teeth too soon after meals can seriously damage them, warn dentists
dailymail.co.uk - 6-6-12
Many people brush more than the recommended number of times per day - especially after a rich meal. But dentists warn that the extra brushing could be doing more harm than good.
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Ginseng can cut tiredness caused by cancer
dailymail.co.uk - 6-6-12
Ginseng helps long-term cancer patients fight off the tiredness caused by the condition. Researchers found high doses of the herb American ginseng over two months reduced cancer-related tiredness in patients more effectively than a placebo. They studied 340 patients who had completed cancer treatment or were being treated for cancer at one of 40 community medical centres.
More...


Cancer survivors face new test in long-term care
msnbc.msn.com - 6-6-12
Mario Alberico got his education in oncology the hard way. He has lived with cancer and the long-term effects of his treatment for most of his life.
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New Method For Detecting Fetal Down Syndrome And Edwards Syndrome Shows Promise
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-6-12
A new study, published online in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology states that false positive and false negative results have been produced by current Down syndrome and Edwards syndrome screening methods, but researchers have found a new genetic test which is close to 100% accurate.
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Genetic Risk Scores And Obesity Later In Life Among Children
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-6-12
People with higher genetic risk scores usually have a greater chance of becoming chronically obese when they are adults, researchers from Duke University, Durham, N.C. report in Archive of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. Certain genetic characteristics lead to rapid growth during childhood, and a higher risk of obesity during adulthood, the authors added.
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New Synthetic Drug "Bath Salts" Causing Zombie Chaos
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-6-12
The synthetic version of marijuana, known as spice, made headlines recently when the Federal Government moved to extend the ban on its distribution. Now, a far more horrific substance nicknamed "bath salts" is hitting the streets. The name is certainly misleading and it's definitely not going to give you a relaxing lavender scent while you lounge in the Jacuzzi with your lover; as one unfortunate young man from Tennessee discovered.
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Powerful magnets in toys raise risks from swallowing
cnn.com - 6-6-12
Several months ago, Meaghin and Jonathan Jordan were strolling through a shop near their home in Kiln, Mississippi, when they spotted a box of high-powered magnets that could be arranged and rearranged into various shapes.
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Insight: Dengue vaccine in sight, after 70 years
reuters.com - 6-6-12
One of the grimmest legacies of the war in the Pacific is still being fought 70 years on, but a victory over dengue, the intensely painful "breakbone fever" which that conflict helped spread around the world, may be in sight.
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U.S. racial gap in life expectancy shrinks: study
reuters.com - 6-6-12
Whites in the United States have typically lived longer on average than blacks, but a new study released on Tuesday suggests that gap in life expectancy may be shrinking.
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Black girls don't benefit as much from exercise: study
reuters.com - 6-6-12
In a new study of U.S. preteen and teen girls, daily exercise was strongly linked to weight and obesity in white girls but not black girls.
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Blood Tests Might Help Guide Breast Cancer Care
healthday.com - 6-6-12
A simple blood test may help gauge prognosis and tailor treatments for women who have been diagnosed with early stage breast cancer.
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Daily Low-Dose Aspirin Risks Seem to Outweigh Gains for Many: Study
healthday.com - 6-6-12
Unless you're at high risk for cardiovascular disease, you probably shouldn't take a low-dose aspirin every day, a new study suggests.
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Milk Ingredient Does a Waistline Good
sciencedaily.com - 6-6-12
A natural ingredient found in milk can protect against obesity even as mice continue to enjoy diets that are high in fat. The researchers who report their findings in the June Cell Metabolism, a Cell Press publication, liken this milk ingredient to a new kind of vitamin.
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Overfed Fruit Flies Develop Insulin Resistance; Represent New Tool to Study Human Diabetes
sciencedaily.com - 6-6-12
Researchers find that fruit flies overloading on carbs and protein not only gain weight but have shortened life spans -- and develop insulin resistance, a hallmark of Type 2 human diabetes.
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Between Ear and Brain, an Orderly Orchestra of Synapses
sciencedaily.com - 6-6-12
The brain receives information from the ear in a surprisingly orderly fashion, according to a University at Buffalo study scheduled to appear June 6 in the Journal of Neuroscience.
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Mothers' Teen Cannabinoid Exposure May Increase Response of Offspring to Opiate Drugs
sciencedaily.com - 6-6-12
Mothers who use marijuana as teens -- long before having children -- may put their future children at a higher risk of drug abuse, new research suggests.
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People who eat tree nuts reduce heart risk
upi.com - 6-6-12
People who eat nuts had lower body mass index and decreased health risk factors for cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome, U.S. researchers said.
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Why it's hard to trace food poisoning
upi.com - 6-6-12
A multidisciplinary team of U.S. and international scientists said finding the sources of food poisoning was more difficult because food crosses borders.
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Doctors can pick the 'right' egg in IVF
upi.com - 6-6-12
U.S. and U.K. researchers say they identified the chromosomal makeup of a human egg that may make it possible to avoid abnormal eggs in in vitro fertilization.
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British rate life and prospects dimly
upi.com - 6-6-12
Britons rate their current life and their future prospects, on average, about 10 points lower than they did in 2011, the Gallup Life Evaluation Index shows.
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Excess exercise 'hurts the heart' and cause dangerous long-term harm, say scientists
dailymail.co.uk - 6-5-12
Extreme exercise such as marathons may permanently damage the heart and trigger rhythm abnormalities, warn researchers. They say the safe ‘upper limit’ for heart health is a maximum of an hour a day - after which there is little benefit to the individual. A review of research evidence by US physicians says intensive training schedules and extreme endurance competitions can cause long-term harm to people’s hearts.
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Drug slows advanced prostate cancer
upi.com - 6-5-12
A drug was so effective in slowing the spread of metastatic prostate cancer, that those taking the placebo were given the drug, U.S. researchers said.
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Cryptosporidium source sought in Britain
upi.com - 6-5-12
British health investigators said they are trying to find the source of the parasite Cryptosporidium, which has made more than 260 people ill. Cryptosporidium is usually associated with contained swimming pools, lakes and food -- contaminated by human or animal feces -- but no source has been identified for the outbreak that made hundreds sick in North East, Yorkshire, West and East Midlands, The Daily Telegraph reported.
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The Trouble With ‘Doctor Knows Best’
nytimes.com - 6-5-12
Doctors were told last month that we should stop doing so many screenings for prostate cancer with the prostate-specific antigen test. We learned that sigmoidoscopy is a cheaper, easier and effective alternative to colonoscopy for colon cancer screening. And a study I led turned up strong evidence that routine lung cancer screenings are justified only for people at high risk because of heavy smoking in the past.
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Breakthrough as new breast cancer drug increases remission time and reduces side-effects of chemotherapy
dailymail.co.uk - 6-5-12
Medical experts in the UK have made a major breakthrough in their research to keep breast cancer at bay for longer. A new drug, which has been tested, has been proven to stall the disease for longer than current treatments, providing fresh hope for patients.
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Ginseng can cut tiredness caused by cancer
dailymail.co.uk - 6-5-12
Ginseng helps long-term cancer patients fight off the tiredness caused by the condition. Researchers found high doses of the herb American ginseng over two months reduced cancer-related tiredness in patients more effectively than a placebo. They studied 340 patients who had completed cancer treatment or were being treated for cancer at one of 40 community medical centres.
More...


Antioxidant May Reduce Irritability In Kids With Autism
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-5-12
Researchers have found that a specific antioxidant, called N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), may reduce irritability in children with autism.
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Two Thirds Of New Mothers Have Trouble Breast Feeding
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-5-12
A survey published in the journal Pediatrics shows that two third of mothers nursing new-borns are unable to manage breast feeding, for as long as they intended.
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Soy doesn't boost brainpower in older women: study
reuters.com - 6-5-12
Taking daily soy supplements doesn't improve thinking and memory skills or keep them from declining in older women, new findings suggest.
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'Uncertainty' Remains Over Supply of Key Cancer Drugs
healthday.com - 6-5-12
John Mahan, a 58-year-old Nashville firefighter battling a gastrointestinal cancer, couldn't believe what he was hearing last July.
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Who's Touching You Affects How It Feels: Study
healthday.com - 6-5-12
A human touch can feel sensual or scary or somewhere in between. Now a new study provides insight into how minds translate a sensation on the legs into a message in the brain.
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High Blood Caffeine Levels in Older Adults Linked to Avoidance of Alzheimer’s Disease
sciencedaily.com - 6-5-12
Those cups of coffee that you drink every day to keep alert appear to have an extra perk -- especially if you're an older adult. A recent study monitoring the memory and thinking processes of people older than 65 found that all those with higher blood caffeine levels avoided the onset of Alzheimer's disease in the two-to-four years of study follow-up. Moreover, coffee appeared to be the major or only source of caffeine for these individuals.
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Will a NYC Supersize Soda Ban Help Obesity Battle?
sciencedaily.com - 6-5-12
In an effort to reverse the supersize citizens of his city, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has proposed a ban on the sale of large sodas. Experts at the University of Alabama at Birmingham say by focusing on one product we could be missing the big picture in the obesity battle.
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Cannabinoid Shown Effective as Adjuvant Analgesic for Cancer Pain
sciencedaily.com - 6-5-12
An investigational cannabinoid therapy helped provide effective analgesia when used as an adjuvant medication for cancer patients with pain that responded poorly to opioids, according to results of a multicenter trial reported in The Journal of Pain, published by the American Pain Society.
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Practise what you preach: Mothers who want their children to eat healthy food 'must lead by example'
dailymail.co.uk - 6-4-12
Mothers who binge on junk food are closely watched by their children who go on to adopt unhealthy eating habits of their own, according to a study. Those who eat a healthy diet at home set the best example for children who subconsciously monitor every mouthful, according to researchers at Michigan State University. The scientists studied the eating habits of low-income families.
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Pioglitazone Raises Bladder Cancer Risk In Diabetes Patients
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-4-12
Patients with type 2 diabetes who take medication pioglitazone have a higher risk of incident bladder cancer than diabetes patients who do not, researchers from McGill University, Canada, reported in the BMJ. The authors added that bladder cancer risk was also linked to pioglitazone usage duration and dosage.
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Injection Offers Hope For Treating Autoimmune Disease
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-4-12
Australian researchers have uncovered a potential new way to regulate the body's natural immune response, offering hope of a simple and effective treatment for auto-immune diseases.
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Study questions fruit sugar role in hypertension
reuters.com - 6-4-12
Sweet drinks have been linked to a slightly higher risk of developing high blood pressure, but a U.S. study finds that fruit sugar may not be the culprit as found in earlier research.
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'Rediscovered' Lymphoma Drug Helps Double Survival: Study
healthday.com - 6-4-12
A drug first developed in East Germany in the 1960s has re-emerged as a potent "new" weapon against certain types of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, researchers report.
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Cancer Therapy That Boosts Immune System Ready for Wider Testing
sciencedaily.com - 6-4-12
Two clinical trials led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers in collaboration with other medical centers, testing experimental drugs aimed at restoring the immune system's ability to spot and attack cancer, have shown promising early results in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma, and kidney cancer. More than 500 patients were treated in the studies of two drugs that target the same immune-suppressive pathway, and the investigators say there is enough evidence to support wider testing in larger groups of patients.
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Fukushima still feeds lawmakers' concerns for West Coast
guampdn.com - 6-4-12
More than 14 months after a massive earthquake ripped apart the Fukushima nuclear power complex in Japan, fears persist about how a follow-up natural disaster at the still-fragile site could impact the West Coast of the United States.
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FIFTH victim has emergency surgery as flesh-eating bacteria strikes again
dailymail.co.uk - 6-4-12
A South Carolina grandmother has become the fifth victim of the flesh-eating bacteria that has sparked terror across Georgia. Louise Thompson underwent emergency surgery to remove infected flesh from her leg and was in a coma for five days. Until being diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis she had never even heard of the bacteria, which attacks soft tissue and muscle.
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'Rediscovered' Lymphoma Drug Helps Double Survival: Study
msn.com - 6-4-12
A drug first developed in East Germany in the 1960s has re-emerged as a potent "new" weapon against certain types of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, researchers report.
More...


5 Questions: The porn effect on young men
latimes.com - 6-4-12
In HBO's new show "Girls," creator Lena Dunham conjures up an image of young men so inundated with online porn that they almost unwittingly try to reenact it in their own boudoir escapades.
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Chia seeds are popular again — this time for nutrition
latimes.com - 6-4-12
Forget Chia Pets. Chia seeds, dietary staples of the Maya and Aztecs, are catching on in America for their omega-3 fatty acids and fiber content.
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A New Class of Cancer Drugs May Be Less Toxic
nytimes.com - 6-4-12
Fern Saitowitz’s advanced breast cancer was controlled for about a year by the drug Herceptin and a toxic chemotherapy agent. But her hair fell out, her fingernails turned black and she was constantly fatigued.
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The Nickel Pincher: Grow Your Own Pet Treats!
rodale.com - 6-4-12
Everyone enjoys a dinner made from freshly harvested backyard-garden ingredients, and that includes your four-legged family members.
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Allergies Linked to Higher Cancer Risk: Study
abcnews.go.com - 6-4-12
Can allergies increase your risk of cancer? A new study out of University of Washington Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center suggests this may be the case.
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Number of people being admitted to hospital because of alcohol jumps 10 per cent in a year
dailymail.co.uk - 6-4-12
The number of patients admitted to hospital as a result of alcohol abuse has risen by more than 10 per cent in a year.
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Mediterranean Diet Good For Mental And Physical Health
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-4-12
Inspired by the traditional dietary patterns of Spain, Southern France, Italy, Greece, and parts of the Middle East, the Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower mortality rate, and reduced chance of developing chronic illness. Now, researchers state that is its also beneficial for mental and physical health too.
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FDA to let women try new breast drugs earlier
reuters.com - 6-4-12
Regulators are moving the goal posts in testing new drugs for breast cancer in the hopes of giving more women with aggressive, early-stage cancers the chance to try breakthrough drugs while they have the best shot at a cure.
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For Advanced Prostate Cancer, New Drug Slows Disease
sciencedaily.com - 6-4-12
A new medication proved effective in slowing the spread of metastatic prostate cancer, while helping to maintain the quality of life, in patients with advanced disease. The phase 3 study was unblinded midway, allowing patients receiving the placebo to instead take the drug because of the favorable results.
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Study to find how nurses cope with death
upi.com - 6-3-12
A study is investigating the challenges nurses face in caring for dying patients and their families, researchers in Australia said.
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Why obesity harms some more than others
upi.com - 6-3-12
Texas researchers suggest an "obesity gene" may account for the fact some obese people are more susceptible than others to diseases, especially type 2 diabetes.
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New Method for Picking the 'Right' Egg in IVF
sciencedaily.com - 6-3-12
In a groundbreaking study,Yale School of Medicine researchers and colleagues at the University of Oxford have identified the chromosomal make-up of a human egg. This discovery may soon allow them to avoid using abnormal -- or aneuploid -- eggs during infertility treatments, and instead to pick eggs that are healthy enough for a successful in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle.
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Producing Artificial Bones from Fish Scales
sciencedaily.com - 6-3-12
Tokyo Tech's Toshiyuki Ikoma and Junzo Tanaka have developed technology for producing artificial bones from fish scales and apatite.
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Marijuana initiative could make or break Obama in Colorado
reuters.com - 6-3-12
Throughout his presidency, Barack Obama hasn't exactly been a friend to marijuana users.
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'Why can't you be like that?' His porn habit hurts her self-esteem
msnbc.msn.com - 6-3-12
Young women who report that their romantic partners look at porn frequently are less happy in their relationships than women partnered with guys who more often abstain, new research finds.
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Understanding The Links Between Inflammation And Chronic Disease
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-3-12
American parents may want to think again about how much they want to protect their children from everyday germs.
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Healthy Eating By Parents Sets A Good Example To Their Children
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-3-12
If lower-income mothers want kids with healthy diets, it's best to adopt healthy eating habits themselves and encourage their children to eat good foods rather than use force, rewards or punishments, says a Michigan State University study.
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Low-fiber diet as teen, bigger belly later
upi.com - 6-3-12
Adolescents who don't eat enough fiber tend to have bigger bellies and higher levels of inflammatory factors in their blood, U.S. researchers said.
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Snacking on raisins controls kids' hunger
upi.com - 6-3-12
Eating raisins as an after-school snack prevents excessive calorie intake and increases fullness in children compared to other snacks, Canadian researchers say.
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Novel Drugs Show Early Promise Against Several Cancers
healthday.com - 6-3-12
Two related "immunotherapy" drugs show early evidence of being able to thwart a variety of tough-to-treat, advanced cancers.
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Leukemia Deadlier for Teens, Young Adults Than Younger Kids: Study
healthday.com - 6-3-12
Teenagers and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a cancer of the blood and bone marrow, are more likely to relapse and less likely to survive than younger children with the disease, according to a new study.
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Long-Term Side Effects Key When Cancer Patients Choose Drugs
healthday.com - 6-3-12
Long-term medication side effects such as fatigue can be key for patients deciding which cancer drug to take, new research suggests.
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Hospitals fight drug scarcity, fear patients harmed
reuters.com - 6-3-12
At the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, pharmacists are using old-fashioned paper spreadsheets to track their stock of drugs in short supply - a task that takes several hours each day.
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Aging Men Turn To Botox For Job Hunting Edge
dfw.cbslocal.com - 6-2-12
There are men in D/FW who are walking around with a big secret –– for them, it’s key to staying successful and fresh in today’s highly competitive job market.
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3 Breast Facts Everyone Must Know
rodale.com - 6-2-12
Breasts are an obsession in America, but they're also one of our most vulnerable parts.
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Diabetes drug 'doubles bladder cancer risk'
telegraph.co.uk - 6-2-12
A commonly-used drug to control Type 2 diabetes could double the risk of bladder cancer, a study indicates.
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Cancer cases to surge 75 percent worldwide by 2030
msnbc.msn.com - 6-2-12
The number of people with cancer is set to surge by more than 75 percent across the world by 2030, with particularly sharp rises in poor countries as they adopt unhealthy "Westernized" lifestyles, a study said on Friday.
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Curry Ingredient Curcumin May Increase Protein Levels In Immune System
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-2-12
The cooking spice turmeric is not only a vital ingredient in many curries, it has also been used for 2,500 years as a medicinal compound in the Ayurvedic system of medicine in India. Now, researchers have discovered that a compound found in the spice called curcumin can increase the levels of a protein known to be vital in the "innate" immune system.
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Fitness may prevent arterial stiffening
upi.com - 6-2-12
Highly active middle-aged subjects appear to avoid the arterial stiffening that typically comes with aging, U.S. researchers said.
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Yoga may benefit stroke recovery patients
upi.com - 6-2-12
An eight-week yoga program for recovering stroke patients improved balance and flexibility and provided other benefits, U.S. researchers said.
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INFOGRAPHIC: Incarceration ineffective to fight drug use
upi.com - 6-2-12
A Florida-based drug rehab center says incarceration is an ineffective way to decrease drug-related charges. Citing the mounting costs of the "war on drugs," topping $1 trillion in four decades, the Unity Recovery Center said addiction rehabilitation is a cheaper and more effective way to reduce drug usage and imprisonment.
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Many Americans Taking Too Much Acetaminophen
healthday.com - 6-2-12
Many U.S. adults are at risk for overdosing on over-the-counter pain relievers containing acetaminophen, according to a new study.
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Healthy Diet, Exercise Extend Life for Women in Their 70s: Study
healthday.com - 6-2-12
Women in their 70s can gain more years by following advice they may be giving their grandkids: exercise and eat your fruits and vegetables.
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Alcohol May Trigger Serious Palpitations in Heart Patients
sciencedaily.com - 6-2-12
The term "holiday heart syndrome" was coined in a 1978 study to describe patients with atrial fibrillation who experienced a common and potentially dangerous form of heart palpitation after excessive drinking, which can be common during the winter holiday season. The symptoms usually went away when the revelers stopped drinking. Now, research from UCSF builds on that finding, establishing a stronger causal link between alcohol consumption and serious palpitations in patients with atrial fibrillation, the most common form of arrhythmia.
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How Does Exercise Affect Nerve Pain?
sciencedaily.com - 6-2-12
Exercise helps to alleviate pain related to nerve damage (neuropathic pain) by reducing levels of certain inflammation-promoting factors, suggests an experimental study in the June issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, official journal of the International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS).
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Psychedelic drug bans hamper brain research
msnbc.msn.com - 6-1-12
Bans on drugs like ecstasy, magic mushrooms and LSD have hampered scientific research on the brain and stalled the progress of medicine as much as George Bush's ban on stem cell research did, a leading British drug expert said on Thursday.
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Vitamin D Supplementation May Prevent Age-Related Disability
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-1-12
Older adults who don't get enough vitamin D - either from diet, supplements or sun exposure - may be at increased risk of developing mobility limitations and disability, according to new research from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.
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Age-Related Vision Loss Prevented By Fish Oil
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-1-12
An omega-3 fatty acid found in fish, known as DHA, prevented age-related vision loss in lab tests, demonstrates recently published medical research from the University of Alberta.
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Fewer food choices don't help people lose weight
reuters.com - 6-1-12
Reducing people's options for junk foods gets them to cut back on the amount of calories they take in from junk food, but it doesn't help them to lose weight, according to a new study.
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Gout Flare-ups Rise Sharply With Certain Foods: Study
healthday.com - 6-1-12
Meat, seafood and other foods rich in compounds called purines are associated with a fivefold increased risk of immediate gout flare-ups, a new study shows.
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Millions risk overdosing on paracetamol by ignoring the recommended daily limit
dailymail.co.uk - 6-1-12
Millions of people are at risk of unintentionally overdosing on Britain's most popular painkiller, scientists have warned. Nearly a quarter of adults taking paracetamol are misusing the drug by exceeding the recommended limit with a 24-hour period. This can lead to accidental overdoses and acute liver damage, according to researchers at Northwestern University in Chicago, who have called for 'urgent attention' to address the problem.
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Premature babies twice as prone to mental disorders
telegraph.co.uk - 6-1-12
Babies born at 36 weeks gestation or earlier had double the chance of being admitted to hospital for mental disorders as those born on term, while those born at 32 weeks or earlier had three times the risk, a study found.
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Limit Alcohol To Half A Unit Per Day
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-1-12
Limiting alcohol to half a unit per day is best for health, say Oxford University researchers who analyzed the link between alcohol consumption and 11 chronic diseases and concluded 4,600 more lives would be saved every year if people in England were to cut the amount they drink to within this level.
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Exercise May Be Bad For Some
medicalnewstoday.com - 6-1-12
A new study suggests that not every healthy person benefits from regular exercise: for a small 7% minority it may increase heart and diabetes risk factors.
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Can a decade of dark chocolate protect your heart?
reuters.com - 6-1-12
A scientific study likely to stir the souls of chocoholics has suggested that eating dark chocolate every day for 10 years could reduce the likelihood of heart attacks and strokes in some high-risk patients.
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Worldwide Cancer Incidence Predicted to Rise 75% by 2030
healthday.com - 6-1-12
The worldwide incidence of cancer is expected to increase 75 percent by 2030, with a projected increase of more than 90 percent in the poorest nations, a new study reveals.
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Hepatitis B Infection Rates in U.S. Higher Than Thought
healthday.com - 6-1-12
As many as 2.2 million people in the United States may be infected with chronic hepatitis B virus, a new study suggests.
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Acne Medication May Raise Risk of Eye Infections
healthday.com - 6-1-12
Teens who take the acne medication commonly known as Accutane (isotretinoin) appear to face twice the risk of eye infections, including conjunctivitis (pink eye) and styes, a new study says.
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The Special Scent of Age: Body Odor Gives Away Age
sciencedaily.com - 6-1-12
New findings from the Monell Center reveal that humans can identify the age of other humans based on differences in body odor. Much of this ability is based on the capacity to identify odors of elderly individuals, and contrary to popular supposition, the so-called 'old-person smell' is rated as less intense and less unpleasant than body odors of middle-aged and young individuals.
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Advanced Visualization Techniques Could Change the Paradigm for Diagnosis and Treatment of Heart Disease
sciencedaily.com - 6-1-12
Researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine are pioneering new ultrasound techniques that provide the first characterization of multidirectional blood flow in the heart. By focusing on fluid dynamics -- specifically, the efficiency with which blood enters and exits the heart's left ventricle -- the researchers believe they can detect heart disease even when traditional measures show no sign of trouble.
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Belief in God linked to 'mentalizing'
upi.com - 6-1-12
Whether a person believes in a higher power might be linked to humans' cognitive ability to infer other people's mental states, researchers in Canada said.
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Guidelines to treat childhood aggression
upi.com - 6-1-12
New guidelines are being written for U.S. mental health specialists and primary care providers to manage childhood aggression, Mayo Clinic researchers say.
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Tart cherries may help with joint pain
upi.com - 6-1-12
Tart cherries may have the highest anti-inflammatory content of any food and may help people with osteoarthritis, U.S. researchers say.
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Offices of men have higher bacteria levels
upi.com - 6-1-12
A study of offices in three U.S. cities found men's offices have significantly more bacteria than women's, researchers said.
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Fish fatty acid protects vision in seniors
upi.com - 6-1-12
An omega-3 fatty acid found in fish -- DHA -- prevented age-related vision loss in laboratory tests, researchers in Canada found.
More...


Drugmakers Vowed to Campaign for Health Law, Memos Show
bloomberg.com - 6-1-12
Drugmakers led by Pfizer (PFE) Inc. agreed to run a “very significant public campaign” bankrolling political support for the 2010 health-care law, including TV ads, while the Obama administration promised to block provisions opposed by drugmakers, documents released by Republicans show.
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Does Radioactive Tuna Mean Fukushima Was Worse than Expected?
accuweather.com - 6-1-12
Radioactive isotopes from Japan's Fukushima nuclear disaster turned up in bluefin tuna caught off California in August, a new study reports. The 15 fish that were tested contained 10 times the background levels of radioactive cesium, including a short-lived isotope that the fish must have absorbed while swimming in contaminated waters near Japan before migrating east across the Pacific.
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