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March, 2012 - Herbal and Health News

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Brain wiring a simple grid, no diagonals
upi.com - 3-31-12
U.S. researchers said the human brain is wired in a simple checkerboard grid pattern similar to that of woven cloth, with no diagonals or winding paths.
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Unhappy Meals: Are Fast Food, Depression Linked?
abcnews.go.com - 3-31-12
You’ve heard of eating comfort food to make you feel better, but did you know eating fast food may be linked to clinical depression?
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Parents who fear child may have autism urged to be pushy as early treatment 'crucial'
dailymail.co.uk - 3-31-12
At 18 months, Cristina Astacio spoke only a few words, wouldn't respond to her name and shunned other children in her day care group. Last October, her worried parents found out why. She has a mild form of autism, a diagnosis being given to more U.S. children than ever before, largely because of more awareness and better diagnosis.
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Panel backs sharing studies of lab-made bird flu
msnbc.msn.com - 3-31-12
The U.S. government's biosecurity advisers said Friday they support publishing research studies showing how scientists made new easy-to-spread forms of bird flu because the studies, now revised, don't reveal details bioterrorists could use.
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FDA: We Won't Ban BPA (For Now)
rodale.com - 3-31-12
Two weeks after a landmark study found hormone-disrupting chemicals like bisphenol A (BPA) are unsafe even in tiny doses, the Food and Drug Administration announced it would not ban the substance in food packaging.
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What is a "Hormone Disruptor" Anyway?
rodale.com - 3-31-12
'Hormone-disrupting chemical' is becoming an everyday term. But what does it really mean for your health?
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Huge Cancer Knowledge Resource Made Public
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-31-12
Bringing the goal of personalized medicine a step closer, scientists who design anti-cancer treatments and clinical trials now have access to a huge cancer knowledge resource, thanks to a collaboration between industry and academia. A report in the 28 March online issue of Nature describes how the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) brings together genome data and predictors of drug response for 947 cancer cell lines.
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Organ Transplant Fluid May Be Contaminated, UK
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-31-12
The Department of Health in England says that Viaspan, a manufactured fluid used to preserve some donor organs when they are moved, could have been contaminated with the bacterium, Bacillus cereus since last July.
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10 things to know about Asian takeout
cnn.com - 3-31-12
You know a little something about how to order healthy at Asian restaurants. Brown rice trumps white, summer rolls are lower cal than egg rolls, and you should run from General Tso's anything.
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Female condom prevents HIV transmission
upi.com - 3-31-12
A female condom program in Washington prevented enough HIV infections in one year to save $8 million in future medical costs, researchers said.
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Non-invasive treatment for bad heart valve
upi.com - 3-31-12
Patients with aortic stenosis who are too sick for open-heart surgery can receive catheter-based treatment instead of open-heart surgery, U.S. researchers say.
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FDA: What pregnant women shouldn't eat
upi.com - 3-31-12
Pregnant women need to take special precautions when eating at a restaurant or a fast-food place because their immune system is weakened, U.S. officials say.
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Oranges may help reduce stroke risk
upi.com - 3-31-12
Health officials routinely advise people to eat plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables but British and U.S. researchers say oranges may help reduce stroke risk.
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Kidney cancers: Major rise 'linked to obesity'
bbc.co.uk - 3-31-12
Obesity is fuelling a major increase in the number of cases of kidney cancers diagnosed in Britain, experts say.
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U.S. Women in Labor Longer Than They Were 50 Years Ago
healthday.com - 3-31-12
American women today are spending about two hours more in labor during childbirth than women did 50 years ago, a new report says.
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Human Attention to a Particular Portion of an Image Alters the Way the Brain Processes Visual Cortex Responses to That Image
sciencedaily.com - 3-31-12
Human attention to a particular portion of an image alters the way the brain processes visual cortex responses to that image.
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ADHD Is Over-Diagnosed, Experts Say
sciencedaily.com - 3-31-12
What experts and the public have already long suspected is now supported by representative data collected by researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) and University of Basel: ADHD, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, is over-diagnosed.
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Is sugar toxic?
cbsnews.com - 3-31-12
Dr. Robert Lustig, a pediatric endocrinologist at the University of California, believes the high amount of sugar in the American diet, much of it in processed foods, is killing us.
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Concerns grow over children using tablet computers
yahoo.com - 3-31-12
Electronic tablets like the iPad are a revolutionary educational tool and are becoming part of childhood, but should be watched carefully so that overuse doesn't lead to learning or behavioral problems, experts say.
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Neonicotinoid pesticides tied to crashing bee populations, 2 studies find
msnbc.msn.com - 3-31-12
A widely used farm pesticide first introduced in the 1990s has caused significant changes to bee colonies and removing it could be the key factor in restoring nature's army of pollinators, according to two studies released Thursday.
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$169M allocated for U.S. autism research
upi.com - 3-30-12
U.S. health officials said they allocated an estimated $169 million for research in 2012 on autism and related conditions.
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'Mr. Nice Guy,' 'K2,' 'Spice' ban in N.Y.
upi.com - 3-30-12
New York state officials have banned the sale of so-called synthetic marijuana also known as "Mr. Nice Guy," "K2," "Spice," "Galaxy Gold" and "Smiley Dog."
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Genetic screenings detect at-risk families
upi.com - 3-30-12
U.S. researchers say they have developed a lifesaving genetic screening program for families at high risk of contracting colorectal cancer.
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Therapy may make cancer a chronic disease
upi.com - 3-30-12
Treatment methods for controlling the growth of cancer might transform cancer from a terminal disease to a chronic, manageable one, Israeli researchers said.
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Drug to treat anemia in dialysis patients
upi.com - 3-30-12
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a drug that treats anemia in adult dialysis patients who have chronic kidney disease.
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Vitamin C may help allergy sufferers
upi.com - 3-30-12
Many predict allergy season this year will be brutal but a U.S. food expert says picking up a few items in the grocery store may help.
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Alzheimer's memory loss linked to zinc
upi.com - 3-30-12
U.S. and Canadian researchers said Alzheimer's disease's memory loss might be due to disruption of micro tubules caused by zinc imbalance.
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A Single Antibody to Treat Multiple Cancers?
time.com - 3-30-12
In a recent study, scientists reported that they successfully tested an antibody treatment that shrank human breast, ovary, colon, bladder, brain, liver and prostate tumors transplanted into mice. The antibody blocks a protein called CD47, which normally sits on the cell surface and issues a “don’t eat me” signal that prevents the body’s immune system from attacking it.
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Amphetamine Spurs Slackers to Work and Workers to Slack — at Least For Rats
time.com - 3-30-12
Want to help your underperforming workers take on more challenging tasks? Amphetamine will do the trick, but it will also cause your high achievers to slack off — at least if your employees are rats.
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Could bacteria cause Obsessive Compulsive Disorder symptoms? Mental health group investigates possible link
dailymail.co.uk - 3-30-12
David Beckham and Paul Gascoigne are just two of the 1.2 million British people who suffer from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) which leaves those afflicted neurotically obsessed about things such as tidiness or cleanliness. A mental health organisation is now expanding research to see if a strain of bacteria may cause children to develop a particular condition with OCD-type symptoms.
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Transplant organs 'contaminated with bacteria'
telegraph.co.uk - 3-30-12
More than 1,000 people who received donor kidneys, livers, pancreases and bowel tissue could have been given organs infected with bacteria from the solution used to keep them fresh.
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Innocent 'kiss of deaf' can cause permanent hearing loss
msnbc.msn.com - 3-30-12
Where's the one place you should never kiss a baby -- or anyone else? The ear, according to a professor of audiology at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y.
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The One-Pot Herb Garden
rodale.com - 3-30-12
Growing herbs is one of the easiest ways to get started with a backyard (or balcony) garden. Here are four you can grow in just a single pot.
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Ancestor Lucy Lived With Tree-Climbing Cousins
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-30-12
Researchers say a 3.4 million-year-old fossilized foot found in Ethiopia did not belong to a member of Australopithecus afarensis, the hominin species of our early upright-walking ancestor "Lucy", but to a tree-climbing hominin cousin with whom she and her relatives co-existed. They write about how they came to this conclusion in the 29 March online issue of Nature.
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Motor Neurone Disease Sees Stem Cell Breakthrough
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-30-12
A breakthrough in a stem-cell programme funded by the UK-based MND Association has greatly improved the chances of developing effective treatments for Motor Neurone Disease (MND) of which the predominant form is Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).
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U.S. Autism Rate Rises to 1 in 88 Children, CDC Reports
healthday.com - 3-30-12
The rate of autism spectrum disorders continues to rise among American children, with one in 88 now receiving such a diagnosis, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday.
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Dating Violence Common by 7th Grade: Survey
healthday.com - 3-30-12
Psychological and physical abuse is a common facet of dating for America's adolescents, a new survey reveals.
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Heavier Baby Girls at Higher Risk for Diabetes, Heart Woes as Adults
healthday.com - 3-30-12
Overweight female babies are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes in adulthood, a new study suggests.
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Chocolate a Sweet Remedy for Many Ills?
healthday.com - 3-30-12
International researchers have uncovered even more healthy properties of flavanols -- the antioxidants found in cocoa beans.
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Two Experimental Drugs Could Improve Psoriasis Treatment
healthday.com - 3-29-12
A new type of treatment may be on the horizon for people with moderate to severe cases of the chronic skin condition known as psoriasis.
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New More-Sensitive Blood Test Catches Recurring Breast Cancer a Year Earlier
sciencedaily.com - 3-29-12
A new blood test is twice as sensitive and can detect breast cancer recurrence a full year earlier than current blood tests, according to a scientist who reported at the 243rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in San Diego on March 29.
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Standard Test May Miss Food Ingredients That Cause Milk Allergy
sciencedaily.com - 3-29-12
The standard test used to detect milk-protein residues in processed foods may not work as well as previously believed in all applications, sometimes missing ingredients that can cause milk allergy, the most common childhood food allergy, which affects millions of children under age 3, a scientist reported in San Diego at the 243rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society's (ACS) on March 29.
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Fish oil in chili and lime flavored yogurt
upi.com - 3-29-12
Fortifying omega-3 fatty acids into savory-flavored yogurt might provide heart protection in a single serving a day, U.S. researchers said.
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Could swine flu vaccine cause narcolepsy? Scientists probe link between drug and increase in cases
dailymail.co.uk - 3-29-12
Swine flu vaccine may have been responsible for a sudden increase in cases of narcolepsy among schoolchildren in Finland, a study has found. The sleep disorder is characterised by periods of extreme drowsiness, sudden naps, and paralysis attacks.
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Good news for curry fans - spicy dish is key to a healthy heart
dailymail.co.uk - 3-29-12
Good new for curry fans - tucking into a spicy dish could be the key to a healthy heart. Researchers found that the compounds that give cayennes, jalapenos and other chilli peppers their heat can lower high blood pressure and reduce blood cholesterol.
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Health experts warn of hidden spread of Lyme disease
telegraph.co.uk - 3-29-12
The number of Lyme disease cases in England and Wales has almost trebled since 2002 with experts warning the true number of people affected by the infection from ticks could be much higher.
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An unprecedented 1 million comments were sent to the FDA on a single issue. How's that for organic unity?
msnbc.msn.com - 3-29-12
Two thought provoking and disturbing studies out Wednesday raise major questions about conduct of the “War on Cancer.” One examines the quality of basic research and the other concludes that half of current cancer deaths could be prevented.
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One Million Americans Demand Labeling for GMOs
rodale.com - 3-29-12
An unprecedented 1 million comments were sent to the FDA on a single issue. How's that for organic unity?
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Heart Attack - Immediate Glucose Dose Reduced Fatality
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-29-12
Immediately giving someone having a heart attack a dose of glucose mixed with insulin and potassium (known as "GIK") could reduce their chance of cardiac arrest or dying by 50%, according to new research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session in Chicago this week.
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Antibody Shrinks Tumors Of Seven Cancers
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-29-12
A single antibody caused tumors from seven different human cancers transplanted into mice to shrink or disappear, according to a new study led by Stanford University School of Medicine in the US. The researchers hope to repeat this dramatic finding with tests in humans within the next two years.
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Europe drinks the most alcohol worldwide
upi.com - 3-29-12
Pure alcohol consumption per capita -- age 15 and older -- worldwide in 2005 equaled almost 6.5 quarts, with Europe drinking the most, health officials said.
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U.S. marriage rate stable, more cohabiting
upi.com - 3-29-12
Among U.S. men, 56 percent of first marriages lasted at least 20 years, while 52 percent of women in first marriages were still married, officials said.
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Most want to eat more produce, but don't
upi.com - 3-29-12
Eighty-one percent of U.S. adults said they want to eat fresh ingredients but fewer than 50 percent actually eat fruits and vegetables daily, a survey says.
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Cancer: 'Book of knowledge' published
bbc.co.uk - 3-29-12
The first volume of a "book of cancer knowledge" has been published, which scientists say will speed up the search for new cancer drugs.
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Even a Little Drinking May Raise Breast Cancer Risk: Study
healthday.com - 3-29-12
Just one alcoholic drink a day can boost a woman's risk of breast cancer by about 5 percent, according to a new review of existing research.
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Lifestyle Changes Help Type 2 Diabetics Keep Moving
healthday.com - 3-29-12
Weight loss and regular exercise help prevent disability in obese people with type 2 diabetes, according to new research.
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Antipsychotic Drugs Might Raise Heart Attack Risk: Study
healthday.com - 3-29-12
Antipsychotic drugs can raise the risk of heart attack in older patients with dementia, a new study suggests.
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With You in the Room, Bacteria Counts Spike -- By About 37 Million Bacteria Per Hour
sciencedaily.com - 3-29-12
A person's mere presence in a room can add 37 million bacteria to the air every hour -- material largely left behind by previous occupants and stirred up from the floor -- according to new research by Yale University engineers.
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Health Impact, Interplay of Diet Soft Drinks and Overall Diet Unravelled
sciencedaily.com - 3-29-12
Are diet sodas good or bad for you? The jury is still out, but a new study sheds light on the impact that zero-calorie beverages may have on health, especially in the context of a person's overall dietary habits.
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Danger of Grill Brushes Identified
sciencedaily.com - 3-29-12
Rhode Island Hospital physicians identified six cases of accidental ingestion of wire grill brush bristles that required endoscopic or surgical removal. The paper calls attention to the need for the public and physicians to be aware of this potential danger. It is published in the American Journal of Roentgenology and is now available online in advance of print.
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Survey: Americans oppose mandated broccoli
upi.com - 3-27-12
Most U.S. adults say the health insurance mandate is unconstitutional, but even more say Congress cannot mandate people buy broccoli, a survey indicates.
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Autistic children subject to more bullying
upi.com - 3-27-12
Children with autism spectrum disorder are bullied three times more frequently than their siblings who did not have autism, U.S. researchers found.
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Drug-resistant strains of TB are out of control, warn health experts
guardian.co.uk - 3-27-12
The fight against new, antibiotic-resistant strains of tuberculosis has already been lost in some parts of the world, according to a senior World Health Organisation expert. Figures show a 5% rise in the number of new cases of the highly infectious disease in the UK.
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Is this finally proof we're NOT causing global warming? The whole of the Earth heated up in medieval times without human CO2 emissions, says new study
dailymail.co.uk - 3-27-12
Current theories of the causes and impact of global warming have been thrown into question by a new study which shows that during medieval times the whole of the planet heated up.
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Study: Pregnancy increases fatal heart attack risk
usatoday.com - 3-27-12
Pregnancy increases the risk of a fatal heart attack, a new study shows, even in apparently healthy women who don't have the normal risk factors for heart disease.
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Genetic flaw that turns flu into a killer discovered
dailymail.co.uk - 3-27-12
A genetic discovery could help explain why flu makes some people seriously ill or kills them, while others seem able to bat it away with little more than a few aches, coughs and sneezes.
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One in three babies born this year will live to 100
telegraph.co.uk - 3-27-12
One in three babies born this year will live to the age of 100, official projections have concluded.
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IBS Drugs With Fewest Side Effects Identified
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-27-12
A new review of published research has identified drugs for treating irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with the fewest side effects. The researchers find that two commonly used drugs, rifaximin and lubiprostone, offer the best options for treating the widespread disorder that affects one in five Americans.
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Childhood Exposure To Germs May Help Immunity
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-27-12
A new study of mice supports the idea that exposure to germs in childhood helps develop the immune system and thereby prevent allergies and other immune-related diseases such as asthma and colitis later on in life. Researchers at the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, US, led the study, a report of which is in the 22 March online issue of Science.
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10 lesser known effects of health care reform law
cnn.com - 3-27-12
On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court takes on a political, social, economic and medical hot potato: the health care reform law that was signed into law two years ago.
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Weight-Loss Surgeries May Beat Standard Treatments for Diabetes
healthday.com - 3-27-12
A new international analysis comparing weight-loss procedures to standard diabetes treatments contends that surgery is more effective at helping people combat type 2 diabetes.
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Too Much Sitting Can Kill You, Study Suggests
healthday.com - 3-27-12
For better health, try standing up more, a new study suggests. Those who spend 11 or more hours a day sitting are 40 percent more likely to die over the next three years regardless of how physically active they are otherwise, researchers say.
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Does Chocolate Help You Stay Slim?
healthday.com - 3-27-12
Here's a sweet surprise for chocoholics: A new study finds that people who eat chocolate regularly are somewhat skinnier than folks who don't indulge their sweet tooth.
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Snacking On Raisins May Offer a Heart-Healthy Way to Lower Blood Pressure
sciencedaily.com - 3-27-12
If you have slightly higher than normal blood pressure -- known as prehypertension -- consider eating a handful of raisins. New data suggest that, among individuals with mild increases in blood pressure, the routine consumption of raisins (three times a day) may significantly lower blood pressure, especially when compared to eating other common snacks, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session. The Scientific Session, the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, brings cardiovascular professionals together to further advances in the field.
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Heart attack aspirin dosage not an issue
upi.com - 3-28-12
U.S. researchers said they found no significant difference between high- versus low-dose aspirin in the prevention of recurring cardiovascular events.
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Rubbing toothpaste on your teeth 'quadruples protection against decay'
dailymail.co.uk - 3-28-12
A visit to the dentist always ends with the same advice - brush your teeth twice a day and make sure you floss in the evening. Now scientists have suggested rubbing some toothpaste into your gums after lunch as well. A team from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, found the technique vastly reduced the risk of developing tooth cavities.
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Beating acne may be a matter of thyme: Herbal cream 'more effective' than prescription gel
dailymail.co.uk - 3-28-12
Beating acne may be simply a matter of thyme. Research shows that the herb may be better at zapping spots than expensive creams, gels and lotions, including some are available on prescription.
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Staying out of the sun can wreck your health: How one in four Britons is worryingly low in vitamin D
dailymail.co.uk - 3-28-12
Are Britons getting enough of the ‘sunshine’ vitamin? Government figures suggest not — a quarter of the population have low levels of vitamin D. This weekend, a leading arthritis charity urged people to get outside in the sunshine to boost their levels and protect their bones. And last month, the UK’s four Chief Medical Officers wrote to health professionals to remind them that certain at-risk groups (young children, pregnant and breastfeeding women and those over 65) should take supplements.
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Women Not Preserving Fertility During Cancer Treatment
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-28-12
A new study from the US finds few young women being treated for cancer take steps to preserve their fertility, for instance so they can start a family later.
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Low Bad Cholesterol Tied To Cancer Risk
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-28-12
US researchers suggest there is an underlying mechanism that affects both cancer and low LDL (so-called "bad") cholesterol, because they found low LDL cholesterol in people with no history of taking drugs to lower their cholesterol precedes cancer risk by decades.
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Popcorn Packed With Polyphenols, More Than Fruit And Veggies
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-28-12
Popcorn is loaded with more antioxidants called polyphenols than vegetables and fruit, researchers from the University of Scranton, Pennsylvania, revealed in the 243rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, in San Diego, California, USA.
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Bariatric surgery may 'cure' diabetes
upi.com - 3-28-12
Bariatric surgery dramatically outperforms standard medical treatment of severe type 2 diabetes, U.S and Italian researchers found.
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Endodontists: Root canal can be painless
upi.com - 3-28-12
Americans want to avoid losing a permanent tooth more than getting influenza, paying taxes or speaking in public, a U.S. survey indicated.
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Chocolate 'may help keep people slim'
bbc.co.uk - 3-28-12
People who eat chocolate regularly tend to be thinner, new research suggests.
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Supreme Court Justices Zero In on Key Provision of Health-Care Law
healthday.com - 3-28-12
The individual mandate -- the portion of the Affordable Care Act that requires Americans to purchase health insurance or pay a penalty -- appeared threatened during U.S. Supreme Court arguments made on Tuesday.
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Widespread CPR Training Could Boost Heart Attack Survival Rates
healthday.com - 3-28-12
Training more people to perform CPR would significantly improve heart attack survival rates, according to a new study in Denmark, where CPR training is widespread.
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Warfarin Helps Cut Stroke Risk, Researchers Report
healthday.com - 3-28-12
The anti-clotting drug warfarin reduces stroke risk in patients with a heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation, research shows.
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Cardiac Cocktail Delivered by Paramedics May Save Lives
healthday.com - 3-28-12
Training paramedics to give probable heart attack patients a mixture of glucose, insulin and potassium may lessen the severity of a heart attack and save lives, new research suggests.
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Some Flame Retardants Make Fires More Deadly
sciencedaily.com - 3-28-12
Some of the flame retardants added to carpets, furniture upholstery, plastics, crib mattresses, car and airline seats and other products to suppress the visible flames in fires are actually increasing the danger of invisible toxic gases that are the No. 1 cause of death in fires.
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New Evidence On Effects of Green Coffee Beans in Weight Loss
sciencedaily.com - 3-28-12
Scientists have just reported striking new evidence that green, or unroasted, coffee beans can produce a substantial decrease in body weight in a relatively short period of time.
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Nanoparticles and Magnetic Current Used to Damage Cancerous Cells in Mice
sciencedaily.com - 3-28-12
Using nanoparticles and alternating magnetic fields, University of Georgia scientists have found that head and neck cancerous tumor cells in mice can be killed in half an hour without harming healthy cells.
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Popcorn: The Snack With Even Higher Antioxidants Levels Than Fruits and Vegetables
sciencedaily.com - 3-27-12
Popcorn's reputation as a snack food that's actually good for health popped up a few notches as scientists recently reported that it contains more of the healthful antioxidant substances called "polyphenols" than fruits and vegetables.
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Sleeping Too Much or Too Little Can Be Bad for Your Heart
sciencedaily.com - 3-27-12
Getting too little sleep -- or even too much -- appears to spell trouble for the heart. New data reveal that adults who get less than six hours of sleep a night are at significantly greater risk of stroke, heart attack and congestive heart failure. Even those who reportedly sleep more than eight hours a night have a higher prevalence of heart problems, namely chest pain (angina) and coronary artery disease, a narrowing of the blood vessels that supply blood and oxygen to the heart, according to research presented March 25 at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session. The Scientific Session, the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, brings cardiovascular professionals together to further advances in the field.
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Rapid Rise in Blood Pressure Before Midlife May Cause Irreversible Heart Damage
sciencedaily.com - 3-27-12
The current "watch-and-wait" approach to high blood pressure readings in younger people may set patients on a course for irreversible heart damage, according to research presented March 26 at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session. The Scientific Session, the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, brings cardiovascular professionals together to further advances in the field.
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Georgia: Most 4th-graders exposed to smoke
upi.com - 3-26-12
More than 75 percent of Georgia's urban and rural fourth-graders had measurable levels of a nicotine breakdown product in their saliva, researchers said.
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Those attending religious services happier
upi.com - 3-26-12
U.S. adults attending a church, synagogue or mosque often report more positive emotions and fewer negative ones, a survey indicates.
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Sleep Your Way to Better Heart Health
abcnews.go.com - 3-26-12
A new study suggests too much or too little sleep can hurt your heart.
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Bowel condition may increase the risk of miscarriage
dailymail.co.uk - 3-26-12
Pregnant women with a common bowel condition may be 20 per cent more likely to miscarry, according to new research.
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Fertile imagination: Women have more sexual fantasies when they're ovulating
dailymail.co.uk - 3-26-12
Women may be more of a slave to their hormones than they realise, according to a new fertility study.
Researchers found single women experienced more sexual fantasies on average during the most fertile part of their menstrual cycles compared to the rest of the month.
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Grief leaves the body at risk of infection
telegraph.co.uk - 3-26-12
It really is possible to "die of a broken heart" according to research that has revealed how bereavement can weaken the body's ability to fight off infections.
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Clock change heart attack link
telegraph.co.uk - 3-26-12
People are at increased risk of heart attacks the two days after clocks go forward, research suggests, because body clock is messed up
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Memory Linked To Specific Brain Cells
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-26-12
Happy or frightful memories like the first kiss or a bump in the night leave memory traces or engrams that we may stimulate when we remember things in the past, complete with time, place and all the sensations we experienced.
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Music Therapy To Prevent Organ Rejection
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-26-12
Music has a fundamental affect on humans. It can reduce stress, enhance relaxation, provide a distraction from pain, and improve the results of clinical therapy. New research published in BioMed Central's open access Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery demonstrates that music can reduce rejection of heart transplants in mice by influencing the immune system.
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Air pollution linked to child attention
upi.com - 3-26-12
Exposure to pollutants from fossil fuel combustion during pregnancy was linked to children with more attention and behavioral problems, U.S. researchers said.
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Don't Forget to Eat Your Fruits, Veggies ... and Popcorn?
healthday.com - 3-26-12
Want a healthy snack? Consider passing the popcorn. A new study says the whole-grain treat contains more of the "good for you" antioxidants called polyphenols than some fruits or vegetables.
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Prepare: Seven vital steps to making the most of time with your doctor and an easy way to remember them
dailymail.co.uk - 3-25-12
When you go to see your GP, you have about ten minutes to tell him or her what’s wrong, for them to understand that, make a diagnosis (if one hasn’t been made) and decide on a course of action. Add to that mix first-time nerves, a doctor you may not know and that feeling of your mind going blank under pressure, and often an appointment can be wasted.
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From eyelash mites to friendly viruses: The 'aliens' inside us all (but don't worry they're here to help)
dailymail.co.uk - 3-25-12
It may look like an extraterrestrial Moon landing or something from a science-fiction film, but in fact the image below shows viruses called phages attacking bacteria – something that happens regularly inside all of our bodies, aiding our immune system.
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Showing Patients Images of Their Clogged Arteries a Powerful Wake-Up Call
healthday.com - 3-25-12
Showing patients with clogged arteries evidence of their condition makes them more likely to stick with treatments such as weight loss and cholesterol-lowering statins, two related studies found.
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Lack of medical marijuana suppliers causes hardships
lcsun-news.com - 3-25-12
Bobbie Wooten, paralyzed from the waist down for 33 years, is one of 4,300 people in New Mexico certified by the state to use medical marijuana.
But Wooten, 51, says she has taken to buying marijuana illegally from street dealers in her hometown of Silver City because she cannot find a state-authorized producer nearby.
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Comfort eating and drinking is costing us our lives
telegraph.co.uk - 3-25-12
What starts as joyful excess flattens out into dulled habit, and finally slow self-destruction.
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Can oral sex really give you cancer?
msnbc.msn.com - 3-25-12
Reports of an increase in head and neck cancers that are caused by human papillomavirus, or HPV, have lead some to propose that changes in sexual behavior, specifically an increase in oral sex, are responsible.
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Judge: FDA must act to cut antibiotics from animal feed
msnbc.msn.com - 3-25-12
A federal judge on Thursday ordered U.S. regulators to start proceedings to withdraw approval for the use of common antibiotics in animal feed, citing concerns that overuse is endangering human health by creating antibiotic-resistant "superbugs".
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Severe headaches tied to suicide attempts
msnbc.msn.com - 3-25-12
People with severe headaches, whether migraines or not, may be more likely to attempt suicide, according to a U.S. study of more than a thousand people.
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Poverty Leads To Poor Health - But Not For Everyone
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-25-12
Poverty is bad for your health. Poor people are much more likely to have heart disease, stroke, and cancer than wealthy people, and have a lower life expectancy, too. Children who grow up poor are more likely to have health problems as adults.
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Photoacoustic Imaging Moves From Lab To Clinic
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-25-12
Every new imaging technology has an aura of magic about it because it suddenly reveals what had been concealed, and makes visible what had been invisible. So, too, with photoacoustic tomography, which is allowing scientists to virtually peel away the top several inches of flesh to see what lies beneath.
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Will living alone make you depressed?
cnn.com - 3-25-12
It's long been known that elderly people are more prone to depression and other mental-health problems if they live on their own. New research suggests the same pattern may also be found in younger, working-age adults.
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Expectations, Exhaustion Can Lead Mothers to Post-Adoption Stress
sciencedaily.com - 3-25-12
Fatigueand unrealistic expectations of parenthood may help contribute to post-adoption depression in women, according to a Purdue University study.
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Highest vehicle death rates in rural areas
upi.com - 3-24-12
U.S. death rates from vehicle accidents rose from 2007 to 2009 with highest rates in rural counties and the lowest in large metro areas, officials say.
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Allergies: How Pollen is Affecting Your Pet
abcnews.go.com - 3-24-12
Springtime brings flowers and warmth. But along with all the benefits of the season come the dreaded symptoms of allergies. Eyes water, noses run and a layer of yellow pollen seems to coat everything in sight.
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Bacteria Help Body Beef Up Immunity, Study Says
abcnews.go.com - 3-24-12
When it comes to bacteria, many people have a pretty simple view: Germs are bad, and our lives should be as free of them as possible.
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Overweight women 'are more likely to relapse and die from breast cancer'
dailymail.co.uk - 3-24-12
Women who are overweight or obese when diagnosed with breast cancer are more likely to suffer relapse and die from the disease than lean women, say researchers.
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How keeping children too clean can wreck their immune systems
dailymail.co.uk - 3-24-12
Today’s children may be too clean for their own good, research suggests. Evidence is growing that dirt and germs can protect against disease - and that our indoor-based, ultra-clean lifestyles are bad for our health.
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How a regular glass of beetroot juice could be the key to beating high blood pressure
dailymail.co.uk - 3-24-12
Drinking a daily glass of beetroot juice could be the key to preventing high blood pressure, researchers say.
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Judge: FDA must act to cut antibiotics from animal feed
msnbc.msn.com - 3-24-12
A federal judge on Thursday ordered U.S. regulators to start proceedings to withdraw approval for the use of common antibiotics in animal feed, citing concerns that overuse is endangering human health by creating antibiotic-resistant "superbugs".
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The Worst Shoes for Summer
rodale.com - 3-24-12
What's not to love about spring and summer? Warm weather, lots of sun, bare feet, and… foot fungus? Depending on the kind of shoes you wear, you could find yourself with a nasty, soil-borne fungal infection that could leave your feet in an unappealing—and painful—state. Researchers in India found that people who work in soil, such as gardeners, and wear plastic-foam shoes are more susceptible to nasty toenail infections.
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Daily Aspirin - More Benefit Than Risk?
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-24-12
Many people take a low dose of aspirin every day to lower their risk of a further heart attack or stroke, or if they have a high risk of either. While the anticipated benefit is a lower chance of vascular disease, taking daily aspirin is not without danger: for instance it raises the risk of internal bleeding. Hence the important need to discuss beforehand with the doctor, "In my case, doc, should I be taking daily aspirin?"
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After hospitalization brain may decline
upi.com - 3-24-12
Older adults who are hospitalized were associated with increased memory and thinking problems, U.S. researchers said.
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Coffee Doesn't Affect Psoriasis Risk After All, Researchers Say
healthday.com - 3-24-12
Although earlier studies had linked coffee to an increased risk for psoriasis, a large new study finds no such evidence.
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ADHD Diagnosis Rates Rose Sharply in Past Decade
healthday.com - 3-24-12
In the past decade, the number of children receiving a diagnosis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has risen by 66 percent, new research indicates.
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Brain Insulin Resistance Contributes to Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease
sciencedaily.com - 3-24-12
Insulin resistance in the brain precedes and contributes to cognitive decline above and beyond other known causes of Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Insulin is an important hormone in many bodily functions, including the health of brain cells. The team identified extensive abnormalities in the activity of two major signaling pathways for insulin and insulin-like growth factor in non-diabetic people with Alzheimer's disease. These pathways could be targeted with new or existing medicines to potentially help resensitize the brain to insulin and possibly slow down or even improve cognitive decline.
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Who Knew? Fruit Flies Get Kidney Stones Too
sciencedaily.com - 3-24-12
Research on kidney stones in fruit flies may hold the key to developing a treatment that could someday stop the formation of kidney stones in humans, a team from Mayo Clinic and the University of Glasgow found.
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Parents of kids with cancer distrust Web
upi.com - 3-23-12
Parents and adult caregivers of pediatric cancer patients tend to avoid online information, which often focuses on a "worst case scenario," a study found.
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Anxiety boosts sense of smell
upi.com - 3-23-12
Anxious people have a heightened sense of smell when it comes to sniffing out a threat, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison found.
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Why having a poor sense of smell increases risk of depression
dailymail.co.uk - 3-23-12
When standing on a hot, cramped train, you may have found yourself wishing you couldn't detect the whiffs of body odour emanating from your fellow passengers. But a new study has suggested that the benefits of lacking this sense are few and far between.
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Breathing Smog in Pregnancy Linked to Child's Behavior Problems
healthday.com - 3-23-12
Women exposed to higher levels of certain air pollutants while pregnant are more likely to have children with anxiety, depression and attention problems by ages 6 and 7, new research suggests.
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Number of schoolchildren classified as being autistic soars by 56% in five years
dailymail.co.uk - 3-23-12
The number of schoolchildren who are classified as being autistic has soared by 56 per cent in the last five years. There are now 61,570 children in state-funded schools who are recorded as having some kind of autistic spectrum disorder. This is up from 39,465 children five years ago.
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Seaweed bread helps dieters consume 180 fewer calories a day - the same as a half hour gym session
dailymail.co.uk - 3-23-12
Eating a slice of bread baked with ground-up seaweed could help you feel fuller for longer, researchers have found. Men fed the speckled toast consumed 179 fewer calories on average than those given a slice of wholemeal - the same amount as you would burn during a half hour session on the treadmill.
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Breakthrough in cancer detection to be tested on smokers
telegraph.co.uk - 3-23-12
A simple blood test that can detect lung cancer five years earlier than conventional screening will be trialled by the NHS on thousands of high risk smokers.
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CDC: Only half of first marriages last 20 years
msnbc.msn.com - 3-23-12
Even though Americans are marrying older, the divorce rate has remained high, a new government report shows.
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"Superbugs" Prompt Urgent Warning From Scientists
rodale.com - 3-23-12
Call it ironic, call it scary—call it urgent, is what America's leading agriculture scientists are saying about a new variety of superbug invading American farms. Thanks to the heavy reliance on genetically modified crops, a tiny worm has overtaken fields, outsmarting the genetic engineering that was supposed to keep it away.
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TB Rate Lowest Since 1953, USA
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-23-12
The rate of new TB (tuberculosis) cases in the USA in 2011 was the lowest since 1953, when official records began, says a new report issued by MMWR (Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report), CDC. The 2011 rate of 3.4 cases per 100,000 people was 6.4% lower than the previous year. 10,521 new TB cases were reported in America last year.
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Adrenaline Shots May Cause Long Term Harm
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-23-12
Giving a pre-hospital shot of adrenaline, also known as epinephrine, to someone with cardiac arrest may help restore circulation in the short term, but could do them harm in the long term, according to a large new study from Japan published in JAMA on Wednesday that suggests it may be a case of saving the heart at the cost of the brain.
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Marker may predict who responds to chemo
upi.com - 3-23-12
U.S. scientists say a marker of DNA damage could predict who will respond to platinum-based chemotherapy drugs such as cisplatin or carboplatin.
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Scheduled feeding may lower baby's IQ
upi.com - 3-23-12
Babies breastfed or bottle-fed to a schedule may not perform as well in school as babies fed on demand, British researchers found.
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Quality protein helps fight aging
upi.com - 3-23-12
Raising daily protein intake can help fend off age-related muscle mass loss, while exercise keeps muscles and bones strong, a U.S. registered dietitian said.
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Obesity harms 'later brain skill'
bbc.co.uk - 3-23-12
Being overweight in later life puts you at higher risk of brain decline, Korean research suggests.
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Higher birthweight 'linked to grandmother gene'
bbc.co.uk - 3-23-12
Scientists say a gene variation could contribute up to 155g (5.5oz) to a child's birthweight.
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FDA Mulls Expanding Patients' Access to Certain Drugs
healthday.com - 3-23-12
Americans troubled by a range of ailments might someday more easily obtain medications that are now only available by prescription.
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Weight Loss Won't Necessarily Help Teen Girls' Self-Esteem
sciencedaily.com - 3-23-12
Obese white teenage girls who lose weight may benefit physically, but the weight change does not guarantee they are going to feel better about themselves, according to a Purdue University study.
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People With Autism Possess Greater Ability to Process Information, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 3-23-12
People with autism have a greater than normal capacity for processing information even from rapid presentations and are better able to detect information defined as 'critical', according to a study published March 22 in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology. The research may help to explain the apparently higher than average prevalence of people with autism spectrum disorders in the IT industry.
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Long-Term Health Care: Higher Costs, Less Coverage
huffingtonpost.com - 3-22-12
Patricia Rief-Heskett purchased long-term care insurance 15 years ago because she was worried about the rising cost of nursing home care. Now that the Omaha, Neb., retiree is 67, she worries that coverage won't be available if and when she needs it.
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Health-Care Law's Many Unknown Side Effects
wsj.com - 3-22-12
Two years after Congress passed President Barack Obama's health-care legislation, despite all the assertions about what it will or won't do, no one really knows how it's going to work. The U.S. has rarely attempted anything of this scale before.
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Sronger food aroma, people eat less
upi.com - 3-22-12
Foods with strong aromas lead to people eating smaller bite sizes, possibly resulting in people eating less, researchers in the Netherlands said.
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Hospitals slow to adopt life-saving drug
upi.com - 3-22-12
Hospitals worldwide have been slow to embrace use of a cheap generic drug that has been saving injured U.S. soldiers on the battlefield, researchers said.
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More obese people have joint pain, heart conditions
usatoday.com - 3-22-12
A new government survey helps quantify what doctors and public health officials have long known: Obese adults are significantly more likely to report having joint pain, heart conditions, high cholesterol and diabetes than people at a healthy weight.
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Lawmakers: Fake pharmacies price gouging on drugs
usatoday.com - 3-22-12
Members of Congress investigating shortages of crucial drugs are targeting fake pharmacies allegedly set up solely to buy and resell the drugs at huge markups.
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Is oversnacking becoming the norm in our nation?
usatoday.com - 3-22-12
Chances are you are nibbling something as you read this. It might be breakfast or lunch, but it's more likely than ever to be some kind of snack.
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People who get headrushes 'are at greater risk of suffering heart failure'
dailymail.co.uk - 3-22-12
People who feel light-headed and woozy when they jump out of bed may have a higher risk of developing heart failure.
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Pregnancy is safe for women after breast cancer - and may even have a protective effect
dailymail.co.uk - 3-22-12
Breast cancer sufferers in remission have been told for the first time it is safe for them to become pregnant.
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What kills one person worldwide every six seconds?
msnbc.msn.com - 3-22-12
Tobacco-related deaths have nearly tripled in the past decade and big tobacco firms are undermining public efforts that could save millions, a report led by the health campaign group the World Lung Foundation (WLF) said on Wednesday.
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Sexual Misconduct Among Most Commonly Reported Online Violations Of Professionalism By Doctors
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-22-12
Results of a survey published in a research letter in JAMA this week, reveal that sexual misconduct and prescribing without an established clinical relationship are among the most common ever reported online violations of professionalism by doctors in the US.
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Your Nose Impacts On Bite Size
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-22-12
The stronger the smell of a food, the smaller our bite size tends to be, Dutch researchers reported in the journal Flavour. This might mean your nose can have an impact on body weight control. According to the authors, the aromas of food may affect how much food we eat.
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Epinephrine may save the heart, but not the brain, says study
cnn.com - 3-22-12
Using the drug epinephrine during a cardiac arrest may do more harm than good, says a new study.
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Art may change brain, help stroke recovery
upi.com - 3-22-12
Survivors of stroke who liked the arts had a significantly higher quality-of-life than those who do not, researchers in Italy suggested.
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Arm blood pressure differences 'predict death risk'
bbc.co.uk - 3-22-12
A large difference between the blood pressure in each arm suggests a bigger risk of dying early, researchers claim.
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Daily aspirin 'prevents and possibly treats cancer'
bbc.co.uk - 3-22-12
Taking a low dose of aspirin every day can prevent and possibly even treat cancer, fresh evidence suggests.
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U.S. Underestimates Long-Term Costs of Obesity, Experts Say
healthday.com - 3-22-12
The costs of the obesity epidemic to the United States and the economic value of curbing it are not captured fully by current methods, according to a new report.
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Hospitalization May Hasten Seniors' Memory Decline
healthday.com - 3-22-12
Seniors' memory and thinking skills decline more rapidly than normal after they've been hospitalized, a new study finds.
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Antibiotics Useless for Most Sinus Infections, Experts Say
healthday.com - 3-22-12
Most sinus infections are caused by viruses and should not be treated with antibiotics, which target bacteria and are useless against viruses, new expert guidelines state.
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Alternative Medicine May Help Ease Chronic Sinusitis
healthday.com - 3-22-12
When used in tandem with standard Western treatments, alternative therapies such as acupuncture, acupressure and dietary changes may spell significant relief for patients battling chronic sinusitis, a new pilot study suggests.
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New Test May Predict the Possibility of a Heart Attack
sciencedaily.com - 3-22-12
New findings from a landmark research study led by Scripps Translational Science Institute (STSI) -- a collaborative program between Scripps Health and The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) -- shows a promising new blood test may be useful in helping doctors predict who is at risk for an imminent heart attack.
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Differences in Brain Function for Children With Math Anxiety
sciencedaily.com - 3-22-12
Scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have shown for the first time how brain function differs in people who have math anxiety from those who don't.
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Study Shines Light On Brain Mechanism That Controls Reward Enjoyment
sciencedaily.com - 3-22-12
What characterizes many people with depression, schizophrenia and some other mental illnesses is anhedonia: an inability to gain pleasure from normally pleasurable experiences.
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Smoking linked to perceived discrimination
upi.com - 3-21-12
Poorer members of racial and ethnic minorities who perceive themselves to be targets of discrimination are more likely to be smokers, U.S. researchers say.
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Daily aspirin may reduce cancer risk
upi.com - 3-21-12
Taking low-dose aspirin daily might prevent several cancers and stop cancer from spreading, researchers in Britain said.
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Obese kids had lower vitamin D levels
upi.com - 3-21-12
U.S. researchers found compared to normal weight children, obese children have lower vitamin D levels.
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Data: Many medical marijuana cardholders are older than 50
tucsoncitizen.com - 3-21-12
Medical marijuana is being used to relieve pain by people of all ages and backgrounds — including the elderly, Baby Boomers and 20- to 30-somethings, according to new data from the Arizona Department of Health Services.
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Million women suffering urinary infections 'caused by CHICKENS'... and modern farming methods are making them worse
dailymail.co.uk - 3-21-12
More than one million women in the UK suffer from painful urinary tract infections every year. Now scientists think they may be caused by an unusual culprit - chickens.
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Women who delay first baby until they've established career 'more vulnerable to postnatal depression'
dailymail.co.uk - 3-21-12
Women who wait to have a baby until after they have established their career are more likely to suffer from post-natal depression, scientists say.
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Everyday chemicals linked to obesity crisis: report
telegraph.co.uk - 3-21-12
Increasing exposure to the chemicals may be partially responsible for the obesity crisis and rising levels of diabetes in the developed world, a report from the Chem Trust has argued.
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Save $$: The Top Green Cleaning Recipes That Work
rodale.com - 3-21-12
Never waste your money on "antibacterial" cleaners and soaps whose active ingredients have been linked to thyroid damage, water pollution, and the emergence of drug-resistant superbugs like MRSA. Instead, kill germs with this all-purpose vinegar solution. It'll only cost you about 20 cents!
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Tinnitus Loudness Reduced In Small Trial Of A Non-Invasive Therapy
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-21-12
The results of a small phase 1 clinical trial of a non-invasive tinnitus therapy where the patient listens to sounds through headphones claims that compared to placebo, the treatment reduced tinnitus loudness and annoyance within 12 weeks in 7 out of 10 patients. Experts who welcomed the news say they now want to see the results repeated in a much bigger phase 2 trial.
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Psoriasis Patients Urged To Be Aware Of Links With Serious Diseases
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-21-12
One of the critical features of psoriasis is chronic inflammation, a condition also seen in people with insulin resistance, obesity, cardiovascular diseases and abnormal levels of cholesterol. Evidence is now emerging of a link between psoriasis and these other serious diseases, prompting the American Academy of Dermatology to urge patients with psoriasis, particularly those severely affected, to be more aware and monitor their health very closely for signs of these diseases.
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Ibuprofen may ward off altitude sickness
cnn.com - 3-21-12
Ibuprofen has been used for decades to treat pain. Now, research suggests the drug's anti-inflammatory properties also may help prevent the piercing headaches and other symptoms of altitude sickness.
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Call for hairdressers to get skin cancer training
bbc.co.uk - 3-21-12
Hairdressers can and should be trained to check their clients for skin cancer, say health experts.
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Mild winter = 'perfect storm' of pollen
upi.com - 3-21-12
The mild winter has resulted in a "perfect storm" of pollen in many parts of the United States on the first day of spring, U.S. allergists said.
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Estrogen plus progestin may up cancer risk
upi.com - 3-21-12
Estrogen plus progestin increased the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women taking hormone therapy, U.S. researchers found.
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Children will lose weight if parents do
upi.com - 3-21-12
U.S. researchers said if a parent is worried about the weight of their child, the parents should lose weight themselves and their children will too.
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Vitamins C, E don't stem Alzheimer's
upi.com - 3-21-12
A combination of antioxidants -- vitamin E, vitamin C and alpha-lipoic acid -- did not improve Alzheimer's disease biomarkers, U.S. researchers said.
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Adrenaline Therapy for Cardiac Arrest Linked to Worse Outcomes
healthday.com - 3-21-12
The decades-old practice of treating cardiac arrest patients with epinephrine -- adrenaline -- might do more harm than good in the long run, suggests a new analysis of hundreds of thousands of cases.
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Physician Misconduct Showing Up on the Internet: Survey
healthday.com - 3-21-12
Some doctors are sliding down a slippery slope in their online lives, committing professional violations, whether intentional or not, and risking their careers, a new survey suggests.
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Vitamin E Supplements Don't Affect Heart Failure Risk: Study
healthday.com - 3-21-12
Vitamin E supplements don't appear to affect a healthy woman's overall risk of heart failure one way or the other, researchers report.
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Novel Therapy Discovered for Crohn's Disease
sciencedaily.com - 3-21-12
The Nutritional Immunology and Molecular Medicine Laboratory (NIMML) research team at Virginia Tech has discovered important new information on the efficacy of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in treating Crohn's disease, a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). CLA is a naturally occurring acid found in meat and dairy products known for its anti-cancer and immune modulatory properties.
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Discovery Provides Blueprint for New Drugs That Can Inhibit Hepatitis C Virus
sciencedaily.com - 3-21-12
Chemists at the University of California, San Diego have produced the first high resolution structure of a molecule that when attached to the genetic material of the hepatitis C virus prevents it from reproducing.
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Pain Relievers Could Be Spiking Your Blood Pressure
sciencedaily.com - 3-21-12
Diseases such as kidney failure and endocrine tumors are among the suspects causing high blood pressure -- but could the common pain relievers in your medicine cabinet be the culprit?
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ER docs don't recognize signs of fake marijuana in teens
usatoday.com - 3-20-12
As use of synthetic versions of marijuana such as "K2," "Spice," and "Blaze" becomes more common, a growing number of teens are showing up in hospital emergency rooms where physicians are unfamiliar with symptoms caused by the dangerous substances, says a new report.
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Health Care Costs Are Greater For Women In Most States
huffingtonpost.com - 3-20-12
Women pay $1 billion more each year in individual health insurance costs even though they tend take better care of their health than men, according to a new report released on Monday by the National Women's Law Center.
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Maryland Teen Threatened Suicide on Reddit If School Doesn't Stop Cyber Bullying
abcnews.go.com - 3-20-12
A Maryland teenager who identified herself only as Sarah was so frustrated with what she said was her high school's nonchalant attitude towards her reports of bullying that she went online and threatened suicide if the school didn't do something about it.
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Hope for my daughter: Doctors reverse rare autism disorder in mice that robs girls of their speech and movement
dailymail.co.uk - 3-20-12
A father has spoken out about a cruel condition that has robbed his daughter of her ability to walk and talk, after scientists made a breakthrough that could lead to a cure. Marc Souter's daughter Dylan was born in July 2009 and by the time she was one had learned to crawl and say a few words and was poised to start walking.
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Guzzling energy drinks but more tired than ever?
msnbc.msn.com - 3-20-12
America is in the midst of an energy crisis. We're guzzling energy drinks and shots at record rates but feeling more lethargic than ever. Sales of these products have more than doubled in the past 5 years, with 35 percent of men ages 18 to 24 drinking them regularly, a new Mintel survey reveals.
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Drug-resistant 'white plague' lurks among rich and poor
msnbc.msn.com - 3-20-12
On New Year's Eve 2004, after months of losing weight and suffering fevers, night sweats and shortness of breath, student Anna Watterson was taken into hospital coughing up blood.
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Is It a Virus or Allergies?
rodale.com - 3-20-12
This year, the flu and other viruses took a backseat as seasonal allergies swept through the nation earlier than ever. An unusually mild winter has brought on one of the earliest allergy seasons ever recorded. "We saw springtime pollen starting in early February, which is very unusual," says Stanley Fineman, MD, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.
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Working Memory Capacity And The Wandering Mind
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-20-12
Studies have demonstrated that an individual's mind drifts off to unrelated thoughts regardless of what they are doing half of the time and chances are you will not read this entire article without thinking about something else.
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Traumatized Women Have Higher HIV Infection Rates, USA
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-20-12
Some of the key factors that fuel the HIV/AIDS epidemic amongst American women are physical violence, sexual abuse and other childhood and adult traumas. The fact that traumatized women have a higher infection risk has long been known amongst the scientific society, however, the journal AIDS and Behavior has just published two new studies, which show that highly traumatized HIV-positive women have an impact on the epidemic and that that their risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is substantially higher than that of women in the general population.
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Methamphetamine Usage During Pregnancy May Cause Childhood Behavioral Problems
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-20-12
Children aged 3 to 5 years whose mothers used methamphetamine during pregnancy have a higher risk of suffering from behavioral problems, researchers from Brown University in Providence reported in the journal Pediatrics. The authors wrote that the risk of developing depression or suffering from heightened anxiety was found to be greater among kids whose mothers used methamphetamine while pregnant.
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Obesity gene's role revealed in mice study
bbc.co.uk - 3-20-12
Researchers believe they have identified why a mutation in a particular gene can lead to obesity.
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Cooling hands improves fitness of obese
upi.com - 3-20-12
A small study of obese women found a device that cooled their hands while exercising helped their exercise tolerance and fitness, U.S. researchers found.
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Study Explains How Shock Therapy Might Ease Severe Depression
healthday.com - 3-20-12
A small new study gives insight into how electroshock therapy, an effective yet poorly understood treatment for severe depression, affects the brains of depressed people.
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Lightheadedness Upon Standing Could Signal Heart Risk
healthday.com - 3-20-12
If your blood pressure drops suddenly when you stand up, leaving you feeling lightheaded or woozy, you may be at greater risk for developing heart failure, a new study suggests.
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Exercise May Trigger Orgasm in Some Women
healthday.com - 3-20-12
Sex may not always be essential for orgasm: A new survey finds that some women can also experience the sensation while exercising.
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Kids Using Synthetic Pot a Growing Public Health Concern
healthday.com - 3-20-12
The recent advent of so-called "synthetic pot" is a rising public health concern, researchers warn, sending kids to the emergency room and prompting parental calls to poison control centers.
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Circadian Rhythms Have Profound Influence On Metabolic Output
sciencedaily.com - 3-20-12
By analyzing the hundreds of metabolic products present in the liver, researchers with the UC Irvine Center for Epigenetics & Metabolism have discovered that circadian rhythms -- our own body clock -- greatly control the production of such key building blocks as amino acids, carbohydrates and lipids.
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Diagnosis of ADHD On the Rise
sciencedaily.com - 3-20-12
The number of American children leaving doctors' offices with an attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis has risen 66 percent in 10 years, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. Over this same timeframe, specialists, instead of primary care physicians, have begun treating an increasing number of these young patients, the study found.
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Smell Is a Symphony: New Model for How the Brain Is Organized to Process Odor Information
sciencedaily.com - 3-20-12
Just like a road atlas faithfully maps real-word locations, our brain maps many aspects of our physical world: Sensory inputs from our fingers are mapped next to each other in the somatosensory cortex; the auditory system is organized by sound frequency; and the various tastes are signaled in different parts of the gustatory cortex.
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Survey: Many fuzzy on healthcare reform
upi.com - 3-19-12
About half of U.S. adults say the Supreme Court should rule healthcare reform's coverage mandate unconstitutional, a survey indicates.
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Why your face can't lie: The uncontrolable tell-tale signs of deceit in high-stakes deceptions
dailymail.co.uk - 3-19-12
Scientists have unlocked a secret code written on everyone’s face which reveals when we are lying. Researchers have discovered for the first time, five tell-tale muscle groups that control facial expressions, activate differently when we are trying to deceive.
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‘Greedy gene’ that makes you eat more even when you are full is uncovered by scientists
dailymail.co.uk - 3-19-12
The secret to staying slim may be all in your genes. Scientists believe they have found the ‘gluttony gene’ which fails to tell your brain when you are full.
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Marijuana legalization backers puzzling over how to keep stoned drivers off the road
washingtonpost.com - 3-19-12
Angeline Chilton says she can’t drive unless she smokes pot. The suburban Denver woman says she’d never get behind the wheel right after smoking, but she does use medical marijuana twice a day to ease tremors caused by multiple sclerosis that previously left her homebound.
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Doctors Health Press Supports Study Showing Yoga's Positive Effects on Relieving Stress
chron.com - 3-19-12
The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is lending its support to a new study showing that yoga could actively protect you from conditions caused by stress.
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Finding health insurance on your own
latimes.com - 3-19-12
If you're self-employed, unemployed or work for a company that doesn't offer medical coverage, you may have to find your own insurance. Some tips to get you started:
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5 bad health habits with a silver lining
foxnews.com - 3-19-12
Life isn’t all black and white, it isn’t all good and bad. We all know that there are grey areas in between; and health is no exception. And so, it is with some glee that I present five bad health habits with a built in silver lining.
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The 10p-a-day vitamin supplement that tackles dementia: So why is the drug industry spending billions?
dailymail.co.uk - 3-19-12
Modern medicine has let us cheat death. We can replace organs, take pills to stave off heart disease, cure many cancers, and control previously fatal conditions such as diabetes. As a result, the average life expectancy is 80, whereas 100 years ago it was 52. Yet now, if these other illnesses don’t get us, it seems that dementia will.
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Docs: Antipsychotics often prescribed for 'problems of living'
msnbc.msn.com - 3-19-12
Adriane Fugh-Berman was stunned by the question: Two graduate students who had no symptoms of mental illness wondered if she thought they should take a powerful schizophrenia drug each had been prescribed to treat insomnia.
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Blueberries and apples tied to lower diabetes risk
msnbc.msn.com - 3-19-12
Eating more blueberries, apples and pears may be linked to lower risk of diabetes, according to a new U.S. study.
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People With Schizophrenia Helped By Smartphones
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-19-12
Psychiatry is employing smartphone technology as an innovative tool in the assessment and treatment of schizophrenia and other serious mental illness. Prominent in this endeavor is Dror Ben-Zeev, an assistant professor of psychiatry at Dartmouth Medical School and director of the Thresholds-Dartmouth Research Center in Chicago.
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Meditation Strengthens The Brain, UCLA Researchers Say
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-19-12
Earlier evidence out of UCLA suggested that meditating for years thickens the brain (in a good way) and strengthens the connections between brain cells. Now a further report by UCLA researchers suggests yet another benefit.
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Loss Of Appetite Deciphered In Brain Cell Circuit: Therapeutic Targets Also Discovered For Potential Treatments For Eating Disorders
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-19-12
The meal is pushed way, untouched. Loss of appetite can be a fleeting queasiness or continue to the point of emaciation. While it's felt in the gut, more is going on inside the head. New findings are emerging about brain and body messaging pathways that lead to loss of appetite, and the systems in place to avoid starvation.
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Negative Health Impacts Of Environmental Chemicals Can Be Prevented By Ob-Gyns
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-19-12
Ob-gyns are uniquely positioned to play a major role in reducing the effects of toxic chemicals on women and babies, according to an analysis led by University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) researchers.
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Older People With Poorer Reading Skills Have Higher Mortality Risk
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-19-12
Approximately one third of older individuals with poor literacy skills appear to have a higher chance of dying over a five-year period, compared to others of the same age, researchers from University College, London, reported in the BMJ (British Medical Journal) today. Poor literacy skills means the person has trouble reading and understanding straightforward health information.
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Tiny Proportion Of Americans Practice Seven Heart Healthy Habits
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-19-12
Just 1.2% of Americans met all 7 cardiovascular health metrics from 2005 to 2010, compared to 2% from 1988 to 1994, researchers reported this week in JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association). Although some factors have improved, such as smoking rates, others have not, the authors explained.
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Fingolimod For Multiple Sclerosis Patients Soon To Be Recommended, UK
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-19-12
Fingolimod, the first ever MS (multiple sclerosis) pill, will soon be recommended by the UK's National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE). NICE is a UK government body which decides which therapies should be covered by the National Health Service, the country's universal health care system. Fingolimod, brand name Gilenya, is made and marketed by Swiss pharmaceutical giant, Novartis.
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Medicaid patients wait big to see doctor
upi.com - 3-19-12
Even before healthcare reform is enacted, many on Medicaid have trouble finding doctors and visit an emergency room more often, a U.S. survey indicated.
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Postpone snack and you may eat a lot less
upi.com - 3-19-12
Postpone an unhealthy snack craving for an indefinite amount of time and the desire for that food decreases, a U.S. food expert suggested.
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Yoga can help caregivers cope
upi.com - 3-19-12
For every victim of Alzheimer's -- about 5.4 million U.S. seniors -- there is an exhausted, lonely caregiver, but researchers say yoga may help.
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Treating sleep apnea may cut heart failure
upi.com - 3-19-12
A nightly breathing treatment for those with obstructive sleep apnea might also help prevent heart failure, researchers in Britain said.
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Varicose Veins Keep Some in Long Pants All Year
healthday.com - 3-19-12
Varicose veins are a cosmetic issue for most people, but they can be a sign of a serious medical problem for others, an expert says.
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Common Virus Can Lead to Life-Threatening Conditions in Children
sciencedaily.com - 3-19-12
Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is a common virus that infects the lungs and breathing passage ways. Though it may only produce minor cold symptoms in adults, it can lead to serious illness in young children and those with compromised immune systems.
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Fraud alert: Phone scammers offer free diabetes supplies
usatoday.com - 3-18-12
If you have diabetes and you get a call from someone offering free glucose meters, diabetic test strips, lancets and other supplies, take note: You are almost certainly talking to a scam artist.
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Mums-to-be warned exposing babies in the womb to mobile phones 'could give them behaviour problems', report
dailymail.co.uk - 3-18-12
Pregnant women who use mobile phones may be putting their babies at risk of developing behavioural problems, scientists have warned.
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The cinnamon challenge: Fun or foolish?
msnbc.msn.com - 3-18-12
Health experts are cautioning people not to attempt a dare that is catching on due to a viral video. As NBC's Lilia Luciano reports, attempting to swallow large amounts of cinnamon powder can do real physical damage.
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Breastfeeding for a year cuts cancer risk by a third: research
telegraph.co.uk - 3-18-12
Breastfeeding for at least a year can cut the chances of developing breast cancer by a third in women with a strong family history of the disease.
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Disease Outbreaks Tied To Imported Foods Increasing, CDC
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-18-12
New research released by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week shows foodborne disease outbreaks in the US that were tied to imported foods appeared to rise in 2009 and 2010, with nearly half of them linked to imports from regions that had not been associated with outbreaks before.
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The Cost Of Delaying Childbearing
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-18-12
Freezing eggs or ovarian tissue for the sole purpose of delaying childbearing for social reasons may prove too costly for society, according to a recent analysis by a University of Illinois at Chicago researcher.
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Spring Break Boozing May Put Young Brains at Risk
healthday.com - 3-18-12
Teens and young adults who binge drink during spring break or at any other time may be risking brain damage, an expert warns.
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Common Virus Can Lead to Life-Threatening Conditions in Children
sciencedaily.com - 3-18-12
Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is a common virus that infects the lungs and breathing passage ways. Though it may only produce minor cold symptoms in adults, it can lead to serious illness in young children and those with compromised immune systems.
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Lyme Disease Surge Predicted for Northeastern US: Due to Acorns and Mice, Not Mild Winter
sciencedaily.com - 3-18-12
The northeastern U.S. should prepare for a surge in Lyme disease this spring. And we can blame fluctuations in acorns and mouse populations, not the mild winter. So reports Dr. Richard S. Ostfeld, a disease ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, NY.
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Americans have five dietary patterns
upi.com - 3-18-12
Five dietary patterns exist among U.S. adults -- traditional, healthy, sweets, Southern and alcohol -- researchers suggest.
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Brain may be hard-wired to care for babies
upi.com - 3-18-12
A brain scan study found adults who are not parents have similar biological responses to those of parents when shown an infant's face, a U.S. researcher said.
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Children whose minds wander 'have sharper brains'
telegraph.co.uk - 3-18-12
A study has found that people who appear to be constantly distracted have more “working memory”, giving them the ability to hold a lot of information in their heads and manipulate it mentally.
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Few low-income moms breastfeed for 6 mos.
upi.com - 3-17-12
Breast milk is rich in antibodies that help infants fight disease but only 2 percent of low-income moms breastfeed to recommendations, U.S. researchers say.
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Sir Richard Branson Asks for a Joint at the White House
huffingtonpost.com - 3-17-12
Sir Richard Branson went to the White House this week to attend a state dinner. It's reported that when he got a chance to speak to President Obama he asked him if he could have a spliff (joint).
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Health care reform: Four inconvenient truths
politico.com - 3-17-12
President Barack Obama promised over and over during the health care debate that “if you like your health care plan, you can keep your health care plan.”
It turns out that, for a lot of people, that isn’t true.
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Adult Acne on Rise as Women Age and Hormones Kick In
abcnews.go.com - 3-17-12
Meredith Modzelewski of Brooklyn, N.Y., is 28 and still dealing with acne on her face, chest and back, a condition she thought she would outgrow after high school.
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Mouth cancer cases soar above 6,000 a year for the first time, figures reveal, thanks to rise in oral sex
dailymail.co.uk - 3-17-12
Oral cancer cases have risen above 6,000 a year for the first time, figures revealed today. Cancer Research UK has attributed the increase to rising rates of the human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, especially through high-risk strains of the sexually transmitted virus.
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Resistance to antibiotics could bring "the end of modern medicine as we know it", WHO claim
telegraph.co.uk - 3-17-12
The world is entering an antibiotic crisis which could make routine operations impossible and a scratched knee potentially fatal, the head of the World Health Organisation has claimed.
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Blueberries and apples tied to lower diabetes risk
msnbc.msn.com - 3-17-12
Eating more blueberries, apples and pears may be linked to lower risk of diabetes, according to a new U.S. study.
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Unexpected Food Source Boosts Breast Cancer Risk
rodale.com - 3-17-12
A common component used in chemical fertilizers could be causing breast cancer, a new study suggests.
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Why You Can't Trust the "Natural" Label
rodale.com - 3-17-12
Meaningless claims do more than just clutter up your shampoo bottle. They could be masking harmful chemicals.
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Plastic Surgery - Enormous Increase In Uptake By Younger Women
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-17-12
Professor Laurence Kirwan, one of the world's leading plastic surgeons, who has appeared on BBC Breakfast to comment on the PIP breast implant scandal and who wrote in the Mail on Sunday (British newspaper) how cosmetic surgery can prolong life, has said that more and more young women between the ages of 35 and 40 years have cosmetic surgery.
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Opioid Addiction - Diacetylmorphine Better And Cheaper Than Methadone
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-17-12
According to a study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), methadone is not the most effective way to treat chronic opioid addiction. Researchers from the Center for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences (CHEOS) at Providence Health Care, University of British Columbia, Université de Montréal and the Northern Ontario School of Medicine (Sudbury, Ont.), have found that injecting an active ingredient in heroin, called diacetylmorphine, is more effective and less expensive treatment.
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Sea Worm Challenges Theory Of How Brain Evolved
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-17-12
If you go far enough back along the branch of the evolutionary tree of life that humans sit on, you get to the part near the trunk where verterbrates (creatures with spines) split from invertebrates (creatures without spines). Current theories suggest the complex brain we share with our vertebrate relatives appeared after this point, but now, thanks to a marine worm with a proboscis that burrows into sand on the sea floor, a new study from the US is challenging that view.
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Poor literacy 'increases early death risk for elderly'
bbc.co.uk - 3-17-12
One in three adults aged over 65 in England have difficulty understanding basic health-related information, suggests a study in the BMJ.
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CDC: Deaths from gastroenteritis double
upi.com - 3-17-12
The number of people who died from gastroenteritis -- vomiting and diarrhea -- doubled in the United States from 1999 to 2007, federal researchers found.
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CDC: More illness linked to imported foods
upi.com - 3-17-12
U.S. foodborne disease outbreaks caused by imported food appeared to rise in 2009 and 2010, with fish being the most common source of illness, officials say.
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Alcohol may lower stroke risk in women
upi.com - 3-17-12
The risk of stroke is significantly lower among light-to-moderate drinkers of alcohol than among those who reported no alcohol intake, U.S. researchers said.
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With Spanking, Nature and Nurture Create More Aggression, Study Suggests
healthday.com - 3-17-12
Using spanking as a method of discipline for kids who have a genetic predisposition to aggressive behavior likely makes them even more aggressive, especially boys, new research suggests.
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Checking Off Symptoms Online Affects Our Perceptions of Risk
sciencedaily.com - 3-17-12
ou've been feeling under the weather. You Google your symptoms. A half-hour later, you're convinced it's nothing serious -- or afraid you have cancer. More than 60 percent of Americans get their health information online, and a majority of those decide whether to see a doctor based on what they find. "Wow, this is an era of self-diagnosis," thought Arizona State University psychologist Virginia Kwan, learning that statistic. How might information accessed online affect individual health decisions?
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Gambling Addictions Expert Warns of Dangers of Internet Gambling, Especially On Youth
sciencedaily.com - 3-17-12
Participating in an online March Madness bracket or fantasy sport league is harmless fun for most people, but for someone with a gambling addiction, it can be a dangerous temptation.
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Lyme Disease Surge Predicted for Northeastern US: Due to Acorns and Mice, Not Mild Winter
sciencedaily.com - 3-17-12
The northeastern U.S. should prepare for a surge in Lyme disease this spring. And we can blame fluctuations in acorns and mouse populations, not the mild winter. So reports Dr. Richard S. Ostfeld, a disease ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, NY.
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Cadmium may be linked with breast cancer
upi.com - 3-16-12
Dietary cadmium, a toxic metal dispersed in the environment and found in fertilizers, might lead to an elevated breast cancer risk, Swedish researchers said.
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White rice link seen with Type 2 diabetes, says study
ca.news.yahoo.com - 3-16-12
Health researchers said on Thursday they had found a troubling link between higher consumption of rice and Type 2 diabetes, a disease that in some countries is becoming an epidemic.
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Sex-deprived male flies go for the booze, study finds
usatoday.com - 3-16-12
Guys, when your sweetheart says "No thanks" to sex, do you knock back a few stiff drinks to feel better? Turns out fruit flies do pretty much the same thing. That's the word from a new study that may explain why both species react that way.
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70% of DSM Psychiatrists Financially Tied to Drug Companies
naturalsociety.com - 3-16-12
The psychiatric bible, known as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, is hailed by psychiatrists and psychiatry supporters alike. The 5th edition of the manual, scheduled for publication in May of 2013, is stirring up massive controversy. Being the go-to text for diagnosing every mental disorder known to (and created by) man while ultimately leading to widespread medicating of the population, the 900-page bible is now being pegged for financial conflicts of interests.
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Forget Asteroids and Volcanoes: Chemically Induced Infertility Threatens Human Race
naturalsociety.com - 3-16-12
With the increase in solar flares and expert warnings over the threat of asteroids, volcanoes, and earthquakes, it’s understandable to be concerned about the future of the earth and mankind alike. What many experts and publications are forgetting, however, is that these disasters may actually be less threatening than the harm placing on our own bodies. Known by some as the ‘infertility timebomb’, men are increasingly becoming infertile at an astounding rate that worries many scientists. We can’t control the trajectory of asteroids, but we can control what we put into our bodies.
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Denver Marijuana Law Vote: Amendment 64 Wins Majority Support In Republican Assembly
huffingtonpost.com - 3-16-12
Fifty-six percent of the delegates at the Denver County Republican Assembly voted in support of a resolution to regulate marijuana like alcohol in the Centennial State. While the initiative, known as Amendment 64, did not receive the two-thirds majority required to adopt it as a plank in the party's platform, advocates are hailing the vote as significant.
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'Pink slime' critics fight ammonia-treated meat
usatoday.com - 3-16-12
The stomach-turning epithet for ammonia-treated ground beef filler has suddenly become a potent rallying cry by activists fighting to ban the product from U.S. supermarket shelves and school lunch trays. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is set to announce Thursday it will offer schools choice in ground beef purchases in response to requests from districts.
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Menopause really does cause 'brain fog' as scientists find women in their fifties struggle with working memory
dailymail.co.uk - 3-16-12
It won't come as a surprise to millions of women who complain about 'brain fog' during the menopause but 'the change' can cause memory problems, according to scientists.
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Mom's last resort: Opiate antidote saves addicts' lives
msnbc.msn.com - 3-16-12
A powerful antidote that can reverse the potentially deadly effects of opiate drug overdoses -- including those from prescription painkillers -- has saved more than 10,000 lives in 15 years, but it’s still little-known and too hard to get, a new report shows.
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After a stroke, the faces of her family looked 'ugly'
msnbc.msn.com - 3-16-12
A Dutch woman recovering from a stroke had an unusual response to seeing her family: The faces of her closest family members looked strange and distorted to her -- even repulsive. But at the same time, strangers' faces seemed normal. In fact, she had much less trouble recognizing the faces of strangers and celebrities than she did her own flesh and blood.
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Heavy dudes have lower sperm counts, study finds
msnbc.msn.com - 3-16-12
Heavy men are more likely than their normal-weight peers to have low sperm counts or no sperm production at all, suggests a new report.
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Loud talkers: Why do some voices seem to be set at top volume?
msnbc.msn.com - 3-16-12
If there were a "Saturday Night Live" skit that sums up Kevin Roberts' life, it would have to be The Loud Family.
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Erotic novel 'Fifty Shades of Grey' goes viral... for good reason
cnn.com - 3-16-12
The book I’m referring to, of course, is “Fifty Shades of Grey,” the first in an erotic trilogy by E.L. James that melds kinky sex with romance. The novel has been selling like hot cakes and is causing quite a stir due to the explicit scenes of bondage, discipline, sadism and masochism (BDSM).
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Overeating? Maybe you're burned out at work
cnn.com - 3-16-12
Work can be a real burden for some people. They feel overwhelmingly exhausted and cynical toward their workplace environment, and believe their efforts are not valued.
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Eyesight 'clue' to mental decline
bbc.co.uk - 3-16-12
Looking at the back of the eye may offer an insight into the health of someone's brain, according to the US researchers.
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Study links womb environment to childhood obesity
bbc.co.uk - 3-16-12
New evidence has linked the environment in the womb with increased body weight in later life.
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Doctors with good habits advise patients
upi.com - 3-16-12
Physicians who practice healthy habits personally are more likely than other doctors to recommend lifestyle modification to patients, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Cell Phone Use in Pregnancy May Cause Behavioral Disorders in Offspring, Mouse Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 3-16-12
Exposure to radiation from cell phones during pregnancy affects the brain development of offspring, potentially leading to hyperactivity, Yale School of Medicine researchers have determined.
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Evidence Builds That Meditation Strengthens the Brain
sciencedaily.com - 3-16-12
Earlier evidence out of UCLA suggested that meditating for years thickens the brain (in a good way) and strengthens the connections between brain cells. Now a further report by UCLA researchers suggests yet another benefit.
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Diabetes Linked to Ulcer-Causing Bacteria
abcnews.go.com - 3-15-12
The same bacterium responsible for most stomach ulcers may play a role in the development of Type 2 diabetes among overweight and obese adults, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center are reporting today.
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Rotting-Ear Case the Work of Deadly Brown Recluse Spider
abcnews.go.com - 3-15-12
The brown recluse spider got some bad press again this week.
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Kids Fail Less When They Know Failure Is Part of Learning, Study Finds
abcnews.go.com - 3-15-12
Kids perform better in school if they know failure, and trying again, is part of the learning process, according to a new study published by the American Psychological Association.
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Baby brains...the secret to a smarter computer?
msnbc.msn.com - 3-15-12
Cognitive scientists hope to bottle up a baby's brain — and the imagination and air of possibility that comes with it — and use the result to make computers smarter.
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3 big brands may be tied to chicken jerky illness in dogs, FDA records show
msnbc.msn.com - 3-15-12
Stumped by mysterious illnesses in at least 600 dogs in the U.S., federal health officials have turned to consumers for help investigating problems possibly tied to chicken jerky pet treats made in China.
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That weird urge to jump off a bridge, explained
msnbc.msn.com - 3-15-12
There you are, driving across a bridge spanning a deep ravine, when suddenly you sense an urge to drive off it. Yet you’ve no desire to kill yourself.
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AIDS Drug Combo Recommended By WHO Comes Under Fire
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-15-12
A new analysis of research evidence suggests that one of the AIDS drug regimens increasingly used in developing countries and recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), may have an unacceptably high risk of failure and rate of drug resistance in patients. The study, led by the Stanford University School of Medicine, appears in the March 15 print issue of the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. In an editorial, eminent researchers call for a clinical trial of the tenofovir/lamivudine/nevirapine combination to decide whether it should stay on the WHO recommended list.
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Health care costs to surpass total income?
cnn.com - 3-15-12
Take a close look at the chart up above. It’s taken from a new paper, in the Annals of Family Medicine. If you believe the doctors who put it together, it tells one of the scariest stories you’ll ever hear.
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Eating more trans fat = greater aggression
upi.com - 3-15-12
Consumption of dietary trans fatty acids is associated with irritability and aggression in men and women of all ages, U.S. researchers found.
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Heavy drinking increases days in hospital
upi.com - 3-15-12
People who score highest on a key test for alcoholism experience longer postoperative hospital stays than those with lower scores, U.S. researchers say.
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Lose belly fat, improve blood vessels
upi.com - 3-15-12
Overweight people who lose weight, especially belly fat, can improve blood vessel function no matter what diet they choose, U.S. researchers say.
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Fatty Foods Might Harm Men's Sperm, Research Suggests
healthday.com - 3-15-12
Could the fatty foods a man eats harm his fertility? So says a new study that finds chowing down on high-fat meals reduces a man's sperm levels.
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Low-Carb, Low-Fat Diets May Each Help the Heart
healthday.com - 3-15-12
Using either a low-carbohydrate or low-fat diet to shed belly fat can improve blood vessel function, researchers say.
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Type of Bacteria May Be Linked to Diabetes
healthday.com - 3-15-12
There may be a link between H. pylori bacteria and type 2 diabetes in adults, according to a new study.
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Inflammation Might Play Role in Heart Disease: Study
healthday.com - 3-15-12
A protein involved in inflammation appears to play a role in the development of coronary heart disease, new research indicates.
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Your Neighborhood Can Affect Your Heart Health
healthday.com - 3-15-12
Living in a neighborhood with parks, safe areas to walk, grocery stores and produce markets is good for your heart, a new study says.
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Brisk Daily Walk Could Counter 'Obesity Genes'
healthday.com - 3-15-12
People who walk briskly an hour a day could beat back a genetic predisposition to be overweight, compared to those who plant themselves in front of the TV, new research suggests.
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Health and Ecosystem Issues Found With Popular Pavement Sealcoat
sciencedaily.com - 3-15-12
A parking lot at the edge of the University of New Hampshire campus has contributed important research to an emerging concern for the environment and human health.
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Motivation to Be Active May Lead to Impulsive Behavior
sciencedaily.com - 3-15-12
Those motivated to actively change bad habits may be setting themselves up for failure, a new study suggests. The study, described in an article in the journal Motivation and Emotion, found that people primed with words suggesting action were more likely than others to make impulsive decisions that undermined their long-term goals. In contrast, those primed to "rest," to "stop" or to be inactive found it easier to avoid impulsive decisions.
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'Brain Fog' of Menopause Confirmed
sciencedaily.com - 3-15-12
The difficulties that many women describe as memory problems when menopause approaches are real, according to a study published recently in the journal Menopause, the journal of the North American Menopause Society.
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REM Sleep Disorder Doubles Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment, Parkinson's, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 3-15-12
People with symptoms suggesting rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, or RBD, have twice the risk of developing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or Parkinson's disease within four years of diagnosis with the sleep problem, compared with people without the disorder, a Mayo Clinic study has found.
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Most women not screened for chlamydia
upi.com - 3-14-12
Fewer than 40 percent of sexually active young U.S. women were screened for chlamydia in the previous year, federal health officials said.
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Rainforest remedy to cure toothache: Amazonian plant is turned into painkilling gel
dailymail.co.uk - 3-14-12
The agony of toothache can leave you willing to go to the ends of the earth in search of a cure. But you may need to look no further than the depths of the rainforest. A rare red and yellow plant from the Amazon could offer more effective pain relief than existing drugs and treatments, scientists have claimed.
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Weed v. greed: The real reason marijuana remains illegal
dailycaller.com - 3-14-12
Is marijuana really “the last thing we need … to be legalized?”
According to John Lovell, it is. Lovell, however, makes a living making sure joint smoking remains illegal. As a police lobbyist, Lovell gets paid to advocate for more police programs, most notably the increasingly unpopular War on Drugs, by securing grant funding and collecting fees.
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Landlords of Marijuana Shops Could Lose Property
hispanicbusiness.com - 3-14-12
As California courts and government officials try to unsnarl conflicting state and local laws on medical marijuana, U.S. attorneys are sending a clear message to anyone who rents property to a pot dispensary: We can and will seize your property.
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Prescription Painkillers for Outpatient Surgeries May Lead to Long-Term Use
abcnews.go.com - 3-14-12
Older adults who receive pain medications after surgery may be at higher risk of becoming addicted, according to a new study published in the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.
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Women fed up with their jobs are 'more likely to turn to comfort eating'
dailymail.co.uk - 3-14-12
Women who are fed up with their jobs are more likely to turn to food for comfort in times of stress, according to a Finnish study.
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Farming communities facing crisis over nitrate pollution, study says
msnbc.msn.com - 3-14-12
Nitrate contamination in groundwater from fertilizer and animal manure is severe and getting worse for hundreds of thousands of residents in California’s Central Valley farming communities, according to a study released Tuesday by researchers at the University of California, Davis.
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Many Docs Order Unneeded Lung Cancer Screening Tests: Survey
healthday.com - 3-14-12
Contrary to current guidelines, a majority of American primary care physicians are ordering some form of lung cancer screening test for patients who lack any symptoms of disease, a new national survey reveals.
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Mothers on Antidepressants Less Likely to Breast-Feed: Study
healthday.com - 3-14-12
Women who take selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants, or SSRIs, during pregnancy are much less likely to breast-feed their babies, researchers have found.
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Research Shows 50 Years of Motherhood Manuals Set Standards Too High for New Moms
sciencedaily.com - 3-14-12
New research at the University of Warwick into 50 years of motherhood manuals has revealed how despite their differences they have always issued advice as orders and set unattainably high standards for new mums and babies.
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More Trans Fat Consumption Linked to Greater Aggression, Researchers Find
sciencedaily.com - 3-14-12
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have shown -- by each of a range of measures, in men and women of all ages, in Caucasians and minorities -- that consumption of dietary trans fatty acids (dTFAs) is associated with irritability and aggression.
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Parents' solvent exposure linked to autism
upi.com - 3-14-12
A preliminary study found parents exposed to solvents might have an elevated risk of having a child with autism spectrum disorder, U.S. researchers said.
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Medical debt burdens 20 percent in U.S.
upi.com - 3-14-12
One-in-5 U.S. adults say they are burdened by medical debt and half of them are unable to pay the debt at all, federal health officials said.
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Vitamin D may lower stroke risk
upi.com - 3-14-12
People with higher levels of vitamin D have less risk of stroke than those with lower levels of vitamin D, U.S. researchers found.
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Cancer patients: Higher risk of blood clot
upi.com - 3-14-12
Patients with cancer have an increased risk of deep-vein thrombosis -- blood clots -- but only 16 percent knew of the risk, a U.S. survey indicated.
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It's now illegal to know what's in your food
Vidio (7:23) - 3-14-12
Todd Tucker, Public Citizen's Global Trade Watch joins Thom Hartmann. Put down that fork! Do you now what's REALLY on your dinner plate? Well - it's becoming increasingly difficult for you to find out and there may be very little our lawmakers can do about it. Do you know what's in your dinner? Chances are...you probably don't. That's because recent rulings by the World Trade Organization have made it harder and harder for Americans to know if what they're eating is safe - and exactly where it came from.
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Ten percent of U.S. adults in recovery
upi.com - 3-13-12
Ten percent of all U.S. adults -- 23 million -- consider themselves to be in recovery from drug or alcohol abuse problems, a survey indicated.
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Soda-drinking men at higher risk for heart attack
msnbc.msn.com - 3-13-12
Men who drink sugar-sweetened beverages, including sodas and non-carbonated fruit drinks, may have a higher risk of heart attack, a new study shows.
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Discovery Could Mean Fewer Chemo Side Effects
abcnews.go.com - 3-13-12
While it can often work wonders against invading cancer cells, chemotherapy can also bring on very undesirable side effects, such as hair loss, nausea and vomiting.
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Baby Dies of Herpes in Ritual Circumcision By Orthodox Jews
abcnews.go.com - 3-13-12
New York City is investigating the death last September of a baby who contracted herpes after a "ritual circumcision with oral suction," in an ultra-Orthodox Jewish ceremony known in Hebrew as metzitzah b'peh.
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Chlamydia is a 'cunning' STI that easily evolves into new strains, discover scientists
dailymail.co.uk - 3-13-12
Chlamydia - the world's most common sexual infection - is a more cunning and highly evolved bacterium than thought, scientists say.
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Study: Too much red meat may shorten lifespan
cnn.com - 3-13-12
Want to live longer? Trade some of the red meat in your diet for fish, nuts, whole grains, and other healthier protein sources, Harvard researchers say.
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Lifestyle change halved heart death rate
upi.com - 3-13-12
A British professor said one lifestyle change -- smoking cessation -- resulted in cutting in half the number of men dying in their 60s from heart disease.
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Childhood Leukemia Survival Rates Reach 90 Percent
healthday.com - 3-13-12
Children with the most common type of leukemia now have a dramatically better chance of survival, a new study shows.
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Can Statins Prevent Parkinson's Disease?
healthday.com - 3-13-12
People taking popular cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins may have a slightly lower risk than others of developing Parkinson's disease, new research suggests.
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Poorer, Obese Adults Might Benefit From Behavior-Change Program
healthday.com - 3-13-12
A behavioral intervention program helped low-income obese people lose a few pounds and improve their blood-pressure control, according to a two-year study.
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Seniors' Long-Term Use of Strong Painkillers a Concern
healthday.com - 3-13-12
Older patients prescribed narcotic painkiller drugs, such as codeine or oxycodone, soon after short-stay surgery are at increased risk of becoming long-term users, a new study finds.
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Married Heart Surgery Patients Live Longer
healthday.com - 3-13-12
Married heart surgery patients are far less likely than single patients to die in the first three months after their operation, a new study finds.
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Exercise Might Boost Kids' Academic Ability
healthday.com - 3-13-12
Promoting physical activity among young school kids can end up improving their academic performance, a new study suggests.
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Spring Break Ritual Could Lead to Brain Damage
sciencedaily.com - 3-13-12
Every year, thousands of teens and young adults celebrate Spring Break by drinking large amounts of alcohol -- binge drinking -- a dangerous right-of-passage for some and one linked to possible brain damage later as adults, says an expert.
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Epstein Barr-Like Virus Infects and May Cause Cancer in Dogs
sciencedaily.com - 3-13-12
More than 90 percent of humans have antibodies to the Epstein Barr virus. Best known for causing mononucleosis, or "the kissing disease," the virus has also been implicated in more serious conditions, including Hodgkin's, non-Hodgkin's and Burkitt's lymphomas. Yet little is known about exactly how EBV triggers these diseases.
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Lost Hour of Sleep Over Weekend May Put Heart at Risk Monday
healthday.com - 3-12-12
Not only do you lose an hour of sleep after the clocks move ahead to daylight-saving time this weekend, but you also may be at increased risk for a heart attack, a heart expert claims.
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A protein may help burn calories faster
upi.com - 3-12-12
A protein can throw a switch on fat cells, converting them from calorie-storing white fat cells into calorie-burning brown fat cells, U.S. researchers said.
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Meatless meals gain in popularity for budget, health reasons
usatoday.com - 3-12-12
Whether due to rising prices, concern for the environment or a growing emphasis on health, Americans are eating less meat.
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How do blind people dream?
msnbc.msn.com - 3-12-12
One of the less-talked-about side effects of being blind: fielding many (many!) questions from us sighted folks -- enough questions, apparently, to program a YouTube channel. Tommy Edison, who is blind, hosts the popular YouTube series "The Tommy Edison Experience," where he answers viewer questions: How do blind people use an ATM? How do blind people use paper money?
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5 great reasons to kick your soda habit
msnbc.msn.com - 3-12-12
If you've been reading health magazines and websites for any length of time, you've read a litany of reasons why soda is bad for you. It's nothing but sugar water. It's devoid of any nutritional value. It leads to obesity and diabetes. But we've dug up several other disturbing facts about what soda does to your body, besides packing on the pounds, that don't get much attention in broader discussions about soda and its impact on your health.
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When Cancer Therapy Drugs Get Under Your Skin
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-12-12
Skin problems are the most common adverse effects from new anti-cancer drugs. Ralf Gutzmer, from the Hannover Medical School (MHH), and co-authors now summarize the current state of knowledge in the recent edition of Deutsches Aerzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2012; 109(8): 133-40).
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Decision-Making, Poor Choices And Depression
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-12-12
When faced with making a complicated decision, our automatic instinct to avoid misfortune can result in missing out on rewards, and could even contribute to depression, according to new research.
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Impulsive Behavior Regulated By Cannabinoid 2 Receptors
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-12-12
A new study lead by the Neuroscience Institute of Alicante reveals how manipulating the endocannabinoid system can modulate high levels of impulsivity. This is the main problem in psychiatric illnesses such a schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and substance abuse.
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More HIV Among Black Women Than Previously Thought, USA
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-12-12
The incidence and prevalence of HIV among African-American women is much higher than previously thought in several "hotspots" around the country, according to a new study carried out by a national team of experts and led by Sally Hodder, MD, from the New Jersey-New Jersey Medical School.
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Men, woman unhappy with work/life balance
upi.com - 3-12-12
Lack of work flexibility, lack of career opportunities and low salaries are driving many to reconsider science and technology fields, a U.S. group said.
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New Approach to Treating Type 1 Diabetes? Transforming Gut Cells Into Insulin Factories
sciencedaily.com - 3-12-12
A study by Columbia researchers suggests that cells in the patient's intestine could be coaxed into making insulin, circumventing the need for a stem cell transplant. Until now, stem cell transplants have been seen by many researchers as the ideal way to replace cells lost in type I diabetes and to free patients from insulin injections.
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In Recognizing Faces, the Whole Is Not Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts
upi.com - 3-11-12
How do we recognize a face? To date, most research has answered "holistically": We look at all the features -- eyes, nose, mouth -- simultaneously and, perceiving the relationships among them, gain an advantage over taking in each feature individually. Now a new study overturns this theory. The researchers -- Jason M. Gold and Patrick J. Mundy of the Indiana University and Bosco S. Tjan of the University of California Los Angeles -- found that people's performance in recognizing a whole face is no better than their performance with each individual feature shown alone. "Surprisingly, the whole was not greater than the sum of its parts," says Gold. The findings appear in the journal Psychological Science, which is published by the Association for Psychological Science.
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Produce may enhance skin more than creams
upi.com - 3-11-12
Adding a few servings of fruits and vegetables a day might do more than expensive creams to improve skin appearance, researchers in Scotland suggested.
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Facebook photo trumps text profile
upi.com - 3-11-12
Photos seem to be the primary way people get impressions of others on social networking sites such as Facebook, U.S. researchers found.
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Effort to put marijuana legalization measure on ballot is in disarray
latimes.com - 3-11-12
After Proposition 19 received 46% of the vote in 2010, proponents took heart. They vowed to put a measure to fully legalize marijuana on the 2012 ballot. Instead, four camps vie for funding.
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A woman's best friend: Diabetic mother reveals how her cocker spaniel has saved her life FOUR TIMES
dailymail.co.uk - 3-11-12
A diabetic mum told how her life has been saved four times by her cocker spaniel - Scotland's first blood sugar sniffer dog.
Carol Miller, 42, was devastated when she was diagnosed with type one diabetes in May last year.
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Gerber recalls baby formula because of odor
msnbc.msn.com - 3-11-12
Gerber Products Co is recalling some of its Good Start Gentle powdered infant formula because of an off-odor, the Florham Park, New Jersey, company said.
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'Pink slime' panic grows online: Are we overreacting?
msnbc.msn.com - 3-11-12
After reports that school districts around the country were serving kids hamburgers containing up to 15 percent of the processed product known in the meat industry as "Lean Finely Textured Beef', parents and consumers poured online to express their disgust. As of Friday afternoon "pink slime" became the most searched phrase on Google Trends and Twitter users were expressing their disgust on #pinkslime.
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Pink Slime - Good Enough For School Meals, Not McDonald's
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-11-12
School meals containing ammonium hydroxide, also known as treated ground beef or "pink slime", are OK, says the Department of Agriculture, despite growing opposition from parents and various groups. Even, McDonald's, a company not exactly known for healthy, wholesome foods, stopped adding ammonium-treated meat into its hamburgers since August 2011. Celebrity chef, Jamie Oliver, as well as other retractors are said to have influenced McDonald's into excluding the additive. Other fast-food outlets have also stopped using it, including Burger King and Taco Bell.
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Not All Cases Of Chronic Kidney Disease Are Unstoppable, Some Can Get Better
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-11-12
Not all patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are destined for kidney failure, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society Nephrology (JASN). The findings provide hope that the kidney health of some CKD patients can improve.
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Stem cells beat kidney rejection
bbc.co.uk - 3-11-12
An injection of stem cells given alongside a kidney transplant could remove the need for a lifetime of drugs to suppress the immune system, say scientists.
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Circadian rhythm reset, harder than clock
upi.com - 3-11-12
Resetting the human biological clock -- circadian rhythm -- is a lot harder than resetting a wristwatch or clocks, a U.S. researchers said.
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Genetic Manipulation Boosts Growth of Brain Cells Linked to Learning, Enhances Effects of Antidepressants
sciencedaily.com - 3-11-12
UT Southwestern Medical Center investigators have identified a genetic manipulation that increases the development of neurons in the brain during aging and enhances the effect of antidepressant drugs.
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Expert: Black tea has many health benefits
upi.com - 3-10-12
Tea has many health benefits including manganese, good for physical development, and potassium, good to maintain fluid balance, a U.S. food expert said.
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Internet Addiction Linked to Drug Abuse
abcnews.go.com - 3-10-12
Parents already panicky about the amount of time their teenage children spend online may now have something new to worry about: All those hours spent Web surfing, chatting, gaming, texting and posting to Facebook could be a warning sign of substance abuse, according to a new study in the March issue of the Journal of Addiction Medicine.
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Passing electric current through the brain 'lifts half of patients from depression'
dailymail.co.uk - 3-10-12
Passing electric currents through the brain has been found to lift half of patients out of depression, according to a new study.
Stimulating the brain with a weak electrical current was even beneficial for patients who hadn't responded to other treatments such as anti-depressants.
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Paracetamol 'should be prescription-only'
telegraph.co.uk - 3-10-12
Paracetamol is dangerous and should be made prescription-only, according to the family of a woman believed to have died after taking just "a few extra tablets" a day while recovering from routine surgery.
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Anti-cancer 'super' aspirin under development
telegraph.co.uk - 3-10-12
A new type of 'super' aspirin which appears to have extremely strong anti-cancer properties but does not cause stomach ulcers is being developed by scientists.
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Your personality is revealed in a heartbeat (literally)
msnbc.msn.com - 3-10-12
Aspects of your personality can be revealed in a heartbeat, literally, a new study from Germany suggests.
The study identified heartbeat "signatures" — wave patterns in the heart's electrical activity — that were linked with personality traits.
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The Shocking Truth about Daylight Saving Time
rodale.com - 3-10-12
You'll be surprised to see who really profits from "springing forward."
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Bee Study Gives New Insights Into Genetics Of Novelty-Seeking Behavior In Humans
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-10-12
US scientists studying links between genes and scouting behavior in bees have discovered some intriguing similarities in human and insect novelty-seeking behaviour that suggests the trait, which is assumed to have evolved separately in these lineages, may share some genetic components. Gene Robinson, an entomologist and geneticist at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and colleagues report their findings in the 9 March online issue of Science.
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Magnetic stress relievers called health danger for kids
cnn.com - 3-10-12
A 3-year-old girl had emergency surgery after 37 of them perforated her stomach and intestines. A 12-year-old Australian had her bowel torn in four places after swallowing five of them.
They are powerful pea-size magnets marketed as stress relievers for harried adults but called a safety risk for children by the Consumer Product Safety Commission.
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Does your ground beef contain 'pink slime'?
cnn.com - 3-10-12
A new phrase has oozed into the news cycle: "pink slime."
While one might expect such terminology to deal with a "Double Dare" or "Ghostbusters" reboot, instead, it refers to something that many Americans are consuming without even knowing it.
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LSD 'helps alcoholics to give up drinking'
bbc.co.uk - 3-10-12
One dose of the hallucinogenic drug LSD could help alcoholics give up drinking, according to an analysis of studies performed in the 1960s.
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Pregnancy may reduce risk of MS
upi.com - 3-10-12
Pregnancy -- especially multiple pregnancies -- may be associated with a lower risk of women getting multiple sclerosis, researchers in Australia said.
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EKG Testing May Spot Fatal Heart Conditions in Children
healthday.com - 3-10-12
Each year, between one and six of every 100,000 U.S. children are a victim of sudden cardiac death. In many of these cases, underlying, undiagnosed heart trouble is responsible, and a new study suggests that routine mass electrocardiogram (EKG) screening could help identify these problems earlier, and potentially save children's lives.
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Coming Soon: At-Home Sperm Test for Couples Trying to Conceive
healthday.com - 3-10-12
Women who are trying to conceive often use at-home products such as ovulation predictors and pregnancy tests, but the newest do-it-yourself test to help couples have a baby is for their male partners: A 10-minute test that can determine if a man's sperm count is normal or not.
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Kids Who Bully May Be More Likely to Smoke, Drink
healthday.com - 3-10-12
Middle and high school students who bully their classmates are more likely to use cigarettes, alcohol and marijuana than other students, according to a new study.
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In Recognizing Faces, the Whole Is Not Greater Than the Sum of Its PartsIn Recognizing Faces, the Whole Is Not Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts
sciencedaily.com - 3-10-12
How do we recognize a face? To date, most research has answered "holistically": We look at all the features -- eyes, nose, mouth -- simultaneously and, perceiving the relationships among them, gain an advantage over taking in each feature individually. Now a new study overturns this theory. The researchers -- Jason M. Gold and Patrick J. Mundy of the Indiana University and Bosco S. Tjan of the University of California Los Angeles -- found that people's performance in recognizing a whole face is no better than their performance with each individual feature shown alone. "Surprisingly, the whole was not greater than the sum of its parts," says Gold. The findings appear in the journal Psychological Science, which is published by the Association for Psychological Science.
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Discovery of Hair-Cell Roots Suggests the Brain Modulates Sound Sensitivity
sciencedaily.com - 3-10-12
The hair cells of the inner ear have a previously unknown "root" extension that may allow them to communicate with nerve cells and the brain to regulate sensitivity to sound vibrations and head position, researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine have discovered.
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Eating Wild: Foraging Safely in a Modern World
sciencedaily.com - 3-10-12
In an expanding "foodie" culture, people go to great lengths to get the best ingredients, seek out the most aesthetic desserts, and buy natural and organic. Less noted, though, is the movement of "foragers": people who "eat wild" on a regular basis, supplemented by naturally growing, edible plants for which they search in their local communities, whether urban or rural.
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26 percent of U.S. adults obese in 2011
upi.com - 3-9-12
One-in-four U.S. adults were considered obese in 2011, a Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index found.
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Coke, Pepsi make changes to avoid cancer warning
hosted.ap.org - 3-9-12
Coca-Cola Co. and PepsiCo Inc. are changing the way they make the caramel coloring used in their sodas as a result of a California law that mandates drinks containing a certain level of carcinogens come with a cancer warning label.
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Pat Robertson: Pot should be legal like alcohol
hosted.ap.org - 3-9-12
Religious broadcaster Pat Robertson says marijuana should be legalized and treated like alcohol because the government's war on drugs has failed.
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Suicides, Mental Health Woes Soar Since Start of Iraq War, Study Finds
abcnews.go.com - 3-9-12
Since the start of the Iraq War in 2003, the rate of Suicide among U.S. Army soldiers has soared, according to a new study from the U.S. Army Public Health Command.
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Complicated cancer: New research shows how genetic changes make the disease so deadly
dailymail.co.uk - 3-9-12
British scientists have begun to unlock one of cancer’s most deadly secrets.
In a breakthrough likened to going from watching TV in black and white to colour, they’ve discovered that a single cancer can be dramatically different within one person.
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Men with heart failure more likely to die than women
msnbc.msn.com - 3-9-12
Women with heart failure, a condition in which the heart fails to pump enough blood to meet the body's demands, may live longer than their male counterparts, a new study says.
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Women spot snakes faster before their periods
msnbc.msn.com - 3-9-12
Dwight Schrute would be jealous: A new study suggests that women can detect snakes faster during the premenstrual phase of their menstrual cycles.
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'Pink slime' meat may be on student lunch menus
msnbc.msn.com - 3-9-12
Although many fast-food chains, including McDonald's, have said they are pulling the infamous "pink slime" from their hamburgers, school districts across the country are still serving it to kids. McDonald's and other fast-food chains had been using scrape and waste -- muscle and connective tissue normally used in dog food, in their hamburgers.
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The 3 Biggest Sources of Chemicals in Your Home
rodale.com - 3-9-12
Ever wonder what's exposing you to the highest levels of chemicals? A new study hopes to give you an answer.
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Overweight People May Benefit From Active Breaks During Prolonged Sitting
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-9-12
Interrupting prolonged periods of sitting with regular, two-minute breaks of light or moderate intensity activity like walking may be good for overweight and obese people's health, because new research reported recently in Diabetes Care shows it helped their bodies keep glucose and insulin levels under control after consuming the equivalent of a high calorie meal ("postprandial" levels).
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Advanced Melanoma: Using Patients' Own Anti-Tumor Cells Holds Treatment Promise
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-9-12
Results of a small trial published online on 5 March in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, where patients with progressive metastatic melanoma were treated with billions of lab-grown clones of the their own anti-tumor cells, are raising hopes that a treatment can be developed to knock back the advanced form of this most dangerous skin cancer.
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Depression And Bad Choices Linked To Bias In Decision-Making
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-9-12
A study, conducted by researchers at University College London, reveals that making a difficult decision can result in poor decisions and could be associated with depression. The study is published in the journal PLoS Computational Biology.
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Why women moan during sex
cnn.com - 3-9-12
All you have to do is watch nearly any depiction of female orgasm on screen to get an idea of how a woman is “supposed” to react during sex.
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Alzheimer's patients 'should stay on drugs for longer'
bbc.co.uk - 3-9-12
Thousands of patients with advanced Alzheimer's disease could benefit from drugs, research suggests.
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Light or Moderate Drinking Linked to Lower Stroke Risk in Women
healthday.com - 3-9-12
Light-to-moderate alcohol consumption might reduce stroke risk in women, new research suggests.
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Women Fare Better With Heart Failure
healthday.com - 3-9-12
Women with heart failure are less likely to die than men with the condition, according to new research from Europe.
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Lost Hour of Sleep Over Weekend May Put Heart at Risk Monday
healthday.com - 3-9-12
Not only do you lose an hour of sleep after the clocks move ahead to daylight-saving time this weekend, but you also may be at increased risk for a heart attack, a heart expert claims.
More...


Alzheimer's, Dementia Care to Cost U.S. $200 Billion This Year
healthday.com - 3-9-12
Caring for people with Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia will cost the United States about $200 billion this year, a total that includes $140 billion paid by Medicare and Medicaid, new statistics released Thursday show.
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Mom's Voice May Improve the Health of Premature Babies
sciencedaily.com - 3-9-12
When babies are born prematurely, they are thrust into a hospital environment that while highly successful at saving their lives, is not exactly the same as the mother's womb where ideal development occurs. The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is equipped with highly skilled care givers and incubators that regulate temperature and humidity, but Amir Lahav, ScD, PhD, director of the Neonatal Research Lab at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) thought that something was missing -- simulation of the maternal sounds that a baby would hear in the womb. Now, new research conducted by Lahav and colleagues links exposure to an audio recording of mom's heartbeat and her voice to lower incidence of cardiorespiratory events in preterm infants.
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How a Bacterial Pathogen Breaks Down Barriers to Enter and Infect Cells
sciencedaily.com - 3-9-12
Scientists from the Schepens Eye Research Institute, a subsidiary of Mass. Eye and Ear and affiliate of Harvard Medical School, have found for the first time that a bacterial pathogen can literally mow down protective molecules, known as mucins, on mucus membranes to enter and infect a part of the body. Their landmark study, published in the March 7, 2012 PLoS ONE, describes how they discovered that an "epidemic" strain of the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae, which causes conjunctivitis, secretes an enzyme to damage mucins and breach the mucosal membrane to infect and inflame the eye.
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Survival at a Cost: Common Cancer Treatment Carries Huge Risks
abcnews.go.com - 3-8-12
While the number of cancer survivors has tripled since the 1970s and continues to grow decades later, the cost of that survival for many of them has been the development of secondary cancers and cardiovascular disease related to radiation treatment, according to an upcoming report by a scientific committee.
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Estrogen replacement therapy safe for some menopausal women
usatoday.com - 3-8-12
For certain women, taking estrogen supplements for a few years close to menopause appears safe, and may reduce their risk of breast cancer, says a new study from the landmark Women's Health Initiative (WHI). Those women include only the 30% of menopausal women who've had a hysterectomy, or surgery to remove the uterus.
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Marriage keeps your heart healthy after surgery
usatoday.com - 3-8-12
Marriage is good for your heart – in more ways than one according to a new study that shows married adults who undergo heart surgery are over three times more likely to survive the first three months after the operation.
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How smoking at the weekends does just as much damage to the memory as daily habit
dailymail.co.uk - 3-8-12
People who have a cigarette on the weekends may think they are less at risk from the health consequences than their regular smoking peers.
But now British scientists have found social smokers are actually causing as much damage to their everyday memory than those who puff away on a daily basis.
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Eating fruit and veg 'boosts attractiveness'
telegraph.co.uk - 3-8-12
Yellow-red pigments which give natural produce like carrots, tomatoes and mangoes their colour can also alter the hue of our skin when they are absorbed by fat deposits in our skin, a study showed.
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New melanoma treatment -- a turning point against cancer?
msnbc.msn.com - 3-8-12
A single case reported Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine could indicate a significant change of the course of cancer treatment -- perhaps saving or prolonging thousands of lives.
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Study suggests overall benefit from antidepressants
msnbc.msn.com - 3-8-12
Despite recent debate about how well antidepressants really work in people with only mild or moderate depression, a new analysis of drug studies suggests they may have some benefit across the board.
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Estrogen-Only HRT Protects From Breast Cancer
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-8-12
A study published in The Lancet Oncology, shows women taking Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) are less likely to develop breast cancer. Researchers from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, USA looked at data from more than 7,500 women who were enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) trial and took HRT over a period of about six years.
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Scientists offer a glimpse of life without immune-suppressing drugs
cnn.com - 3-8-12
By the time Lindsay Porter had her kidneys removed two years ago, they were bulging -- covered in cysts -- and together weighed 16 pounds.
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FDA issues warning to 'breathable' caffeine maker
cnn.com - 3-8-12
The Food and Drug Administration has warned a company that markets caffeine and vitamin B as "breathable energy" it could face regulatory action over "false and misleading" labeling.
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CDC: Deadly and preventable C. difficile infections at all-time high
cnn.com - 3-8-12
The number of people being hospitalized for Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) has tripled in the past 10 years according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While other infections commonly spread in health care settings have been going down over the past decade, C. difficile infections are at "historically high and unacceptable levels," according to the CDC's Principal Deputy Director, Ileana Arias.
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Skin products tainted with mercury
cnn.com - 3-8-12
The Food and Drug Administration is cautioning consumers that skin creams, beauty and antiseptic soaps and lotions contaminated with mercury have been found in at least 7 states.
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Kid brain concussive symptoms last a year
upi.com - 3-8-12
Cognitive symptoms can persist for 12 months in children who sustain a mild traumatic brain injury, U.S. researchers found.
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Is Cancer Outwitting 'Personalized Medicine'?
healthday.com - 3-8-12
The genetic makeup of cancer cells differs significantly from region to region within a single tumor, according to new research that raises questions about the true potential of personalized cancer medicine.
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Woman's Recovery From Advanced Melanoma Could Help Guide Research
healthday.com - 3-8-12
Combining the immune-based drug ipilimumab with targeted radiation therapy improved one advanced melanoma patient's ability to fight the deadly skin cancer, a new study says.
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Pregnancy May Protect Against MS, Study Says
healthday.com - 3-8-12
New research suggests that pregnancy may decrease women's risk of developing multiple sclerosis.
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Self-Centered Kids? Blame Their Immature Brains
sciencedaily.com - 3-8-12
A new study suggests that age-associated improvements in the ability to consider the preferences of others are linked with maturation of a brain region involved in self control. The findings, published by Cell Press in the March 8 issue of the journal Neuron, may help to explain why young children often struggle to control selfish impulses, even when they know better, and could impact educational strategies designed to promote successful social behavior.
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How Repeated Stress Impairs Memory
sciencedaily.com - 3-8-12
Anyone who has ever been subject to chronic stress knows that it can take a toll on emotions and the ability to think clearly. Now, new research uncovers a neural mechanism that directly links repeated stress with impaired memory. The study, published by Cell Press in the March 8 issue of the journal Neuron, also provides critical insight into why stress responses can act as a trigger for many mental illnesses.
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Autism: Don't Look Now -- I'm Trying to Think
sciencedaily.com - 3-8-12
Children with autism look away from faces when thinking, especially about challenging material, according to new research from Northumbria University.
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Chemical link revealed in Alzheimer's study
independent.co.uk - 3-8-12
Alzheimer's symptoms such as memory loss could be prevented by targeting a chemical that dismantles brain connections, research suggests.
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Dementia is 'next global health time bomb'
telegraph.co.uk - 3-8-12
Dementia should be made a top health priority on a par with cancer and lung disease, a leading expert has said, after it has become the next global “time bomb”.
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Why redheads feel less pain (but that's no excuse to taunt them)
dailymail.co.uk - 3-8-12
A Danish study has revealed that redheads are more sensitive to the cold and are more likely to suffer from toothaches.
However it's not all doom and gloom with the findings indicating that gingers are less susceptible to skin pain and can handle hot food!
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Vitamin D Intake May Reduce Fracture Risk In Girls
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-7-12
Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals, published an article today showing that vitamin D intake can lower stress fracture risk in girls, especially in regards to injuries caused by high impact style activities.
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C. difficile anywhere medical care given
upi.com - 3-7-12
The life-threatening bacteria C.difficile affects patients not just in hospitals, but also in nursing homes and out-patient care, U.S. health officials said.
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Immune cells can affect blood pressure
upi.com - 3-7-12
The effects of chronic stress on cardiovascular health may be a side effect of having an immune system that can fight infection, U.S. researchers said.
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Baby brain growth linked to medication
upi.com - 3-7-12
Babies of women treated for depression while pregnant were associated with reduced brain growth and a higher risk for preterm birth, Dutch researchers said.
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Fat lot of good: How eating more cheese and milk could make you brainier
dailymail.co.uk - 3-7-12
Are you feeding your brain the right kind of fatty diet? Dairy products such as cheese and milk are among the most reviled of foods, with many experts saying their links to heart disease and obesity mean we should shun them when possible.
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Drug developed to make people drink less alcohol
telegraph.co.uk - 3-7-12
The drug is thought to work by blocking mechanisms in the brain that give alcoholics enjoyment from drink and so helps them fight the urge to drink too much.
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Slow Brain Growth In Babies Linked To Depression During Pregnancy
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-7-12
A recent study, conducted by Dr. Hanan El Marroun, a scientific researcher at Erasmus MC-Sophia Children's hospital, and published in Archives of General Psychiatry, reveals that babies whose mothers are depressed while they are pregnant have a greater chance of growing more slowly than other babies, resulting in the head and body showing retarded growth. Also, the study shows that antidepressants increase the risk of slow growth in the development of babies' brains.
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When Drugs Fail, Surgery May Get Epilepsy Under Control
healthday.com - 3-7-12
Uncontrollable temporal lobe epilepsy affected almost every major aspect of John Keener's life.
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Narcotic Painkillers Another Threat to Traumatized War Vets: Study
healthday.com - 3-7-12
Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans who have psychiatric disorders, especially post-traumatic stress disorder, are more likely than mentally healthy vets to use prescription narcotic painkillers, a new study finds.
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Errors: Post-abortion mental health study
upi.com - 3-7-12
A study purporting to show a causal link between abortion and later mental health problems has fundamental analytical errors, U.S. researchers said.
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Trying to be empathetic key for couples
upi.com - 3-7-12
A man likes to know when his wife or girlfriend is happy, but a woman wants the man in her life to know when she is upset, U.S. researchers found.
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Yogurt that might stop a heart attack
telegraph.co.uk - 3-7-12
Our guts are home to a microscopic world – and their contents may be a matter of life or death, reports Roger Highfield.
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Women, start talking about it. Period! Calls to 'bring menstruation out of the closet' to raise self-esteem
dailymail.co.uk - 3-7-12
The curse, time of the month, Aunt Flo - having a period is an intimate subject many women would rather not talk about, with euphemisms to match.
But U.S. researchers say women across the world need to be more positive about menstruation - and that means talking about it in public.
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Spray-on skin: Diabetic's leg saved after horrific burns are treated with 'pioneering' technology
dailymail.co.uk - 3-7-12
A diabetic who suffered horrific burns when she lost consciousness while her foot was under a hot tap for six hours is recovering - after healthy skin was sprayed back on.
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Dark Chocolate Good For Those With Advanced Heart Failure
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-7-12
According to a study conducted by investigators at UC San Diego School of Medicine and VA San Diego Healthcare System (VASDHS), a flavonoid called epicatechin, found in dark chocolate, enhanced mitochondria structure in individuals with advanced heart failure and type 2 diabetes after 3 months. The study is published this week by the journal Clinical and Translational Science.
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How To Get Fit With 3 Minutes Of Exercise A Week: BBC Doc Tries "HIT"
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-7-12
New research revealed on a BBC TV Horizon programme broadcast in February 2012, suggests it is possible to improve some measures of fitness with just 3 minutes of exercise a week. Medical journalist Dr Michael Mosley, like many people, is not a great fan of exercise for its own sake, and set out to find how little he would need to do to get fit. And he discovered some surprising facts about health benefits of HIT, or High Intensity Training.
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Dangerous Bacteria Also Spreads Outside Hospitals: CDC
healthday.com - 3-7-12
The dangerous bacteria Clostridium difficile spreads not only in hospitals but also in other health-care settings, causing infections and death rates to hit "historic highs," U.S. health officials reported Tuesday.
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Brain Scans Overused on U.S. Stroke Patients, Study Says
healthday.com - 3-7-12
Most stroke patients undergo both CT and MRI brain scans, an unnecessary duplication that contributes to the rising costs of stroke care in the United States, a new study indicates.
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Amish Farm Kids Have Lower Asthma, Allergy Risk: Study
healthday.com - 3-7-12
Children growing up in the Amish culture in Switzerland have significantly less asthma and allergies than Swiss children who didn't grow up on a farm, according to new research.
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Lack of Vitamin D May Harm Older Women's Health
healthday.com - 3-7-12
Vitamin D deficiency is common among women in nursing homes and is associated with an increased risk of death, a new study finds.
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Vegetarian Cutlet: New Method to Prepare a Meat Substitute
sciencedaily.com - 3-7-12
It looks like a cutlet, it's juicy and fibrous like a cutlet, and it even chews with the consistency of a real cutlet -- but the ingredients are 100 percent vegetable. Researchers are using a new method to prepare a meat substitute that not only tastes good, but is also environmentally sustainable.
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Snake venom may provide heart treatment
upi.com - 3-7-12
The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., was awarded a $2.5 million grant to study the use of a snake-venom peptide as a heart attack treatment.
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Poor sleep = increased disease risk, death
upi.com - 3-7-12
A U.S. study found stress led to significantly larger increases in a marker of inflammation in poor sleepers compared to good sleepers, researchers said.
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Group: Soft drinks may contain carcinogen
upi.com - 3-6-12
Chemical analyses found Coca-Cola, Pepsi-Cola, Diet Coke and Diet Pepsi contain high levels of a known animal carcinogen, a U.S. food advocacy group said.
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Mother really DOES know best: Children who eat lunch at home 'at lower risk of obesity'
dailymail.co.uk - 3-6-12
Children who have their meals at home enjoy a healthier diet and are at lower risk from obesity than their peers, researchers say.
A study from the University of Granada found a direct link between who prepared a child’s lunch and how healthy they were.
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ADHD overdiagnosed in youngest kids in class
msnbc.msn.com - 3-6-12
The youngest children in their school grade are more likely to be diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) than their slightly older peers in the same grade, a new study finds.
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Suck it up, kid: Many docs ignore infant pain
msnbc.msn.com - 3-6-12
Wendi Fellner always nursed her baby daughter when she got her childhood immunizations, and that baby has grown into a 9-year-old who’s pretty fearless about shots.
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Should You Bother With Neti Pots?
rodale.com - 3-6-12
For centuries, Neti pots have been the natural remedy of choice for people suffering from seasonal allergies, colds and wintertime funk. The practice, which stems from yoga traditions in India, helps flush out and clean your nasal passages with nothing more than saltwater, and given this globally warmed winter, they could be invaluable tools for fighting an overlapping flu and spring-allergy season.
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Babies Born At 37-38 Weeks More Likely To Have Health Problems
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-6-12
According to a study conducted by researchers from the Universities of Oxford, Liverpool, Warwick, Leicester, and the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, babies born just a few weeks premature have worse health outcomes than babies born at full term. The study is published on bmj.com.
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Soil Bacteria Discovery Paves The Way For New Synthesis Of Antibiotics
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-6-12
Researchers working at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have used powerful X-rays to help decipher how certain natural antibiotics defy a longstanding set of chemical rules - a mechanism that has baffled organic chemists for decades.
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Reducing Lead Poisoning In Children - Prenatal Remediation Strategy Effective
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-6-12
The City of St Louis used to wait until a child tested positive for lead poisoning before inspecting their home and removing any lead hazards, however, now an initiative inspects and clears pregnant women's housing prior to the child's birth to prevent future harm. The American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology has published a study that demonstrates that childhood lead poisoning can be prevented by implementing this measure, whilst decreasing the overall burden of lead toxicity amongst children.
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Regular Smear Tests Raises Chances Of Cervical Cancer Cure 66% To 92%
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-6-12
According to a study published on bmj.com, regular cervical screening can considerably increase a women's chance of surviving cervical cancer. The study, the first to estimate chances of surviving cervical cancer, was conducted by researchers from the Centre for Research and Development in Gävle and the Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
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Could electronic medical records actually add costs?
cnn.com - 3-6-12
Electronic streamlining of medical records has been touted as a way to save money, against the backdrop of a health care system that is characterized as wasteful. Electronic medical records (or "Health IT") are supposed to save billions of dollars by eliminating duplicate or unnecessary testing.
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'Child behaviour link' to snoring
bbc.co.uk - 3-6-12
Children who snore, or who have other night-time breathing conditions, are at risk from behavioural problems, according to a study.
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Moms' Antidepressants May Affect Babies' Head Size: Study
healthday.com - 3-6-12
Pregnant women taking certain antidepressants may be more likely to deliver infants with reduced head growth, a new study suggests.
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Severe PMS May Last Longer Than Thought
healthday.com - 3-6-12
For years, women with the severe form of premenstrual syndrome known as premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) were told that their symptoms should subside the day menstruation begins.
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Depression Could Worsen Mental Decline in Heart Patients
healthday.com - 3-6-12
Older people with heart disease who have undergone a cardiac catheterization may be at much greater risk for mental decline if they also show persistent signs of depression, according to a new study.
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Vitamin D May Cut Stress Fracture Risk in Girls
healthday.com - 3-6-12
Preteen and teenage girls whose diets are rich in vitamin D may be at lower risk for stress fractures, particularly if they are involved in high-impact activities, according to a new study.
More...


Scientists Search for Source of Creativity
sciencedaily.com - 3-6-12
It takes two to tango. Two hemispheres of your brain, that is. USC researchers are working to pin down the exact source of creativity in the brain and have found that the left hemisphere of your brain, thought to be the logic and math portion, actually plays a critical role in creative thinking.
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For sex, Christmas outdoes Valentine's Day
upi.com - 3-5-12
For sex, Valentine's Day cannot compete, at least statistically, with Christmas -- the time of year couples have the most sex, U.S. fertility experts said.
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Calif. doc charged with murder for prescriptions
usatoday.com - 3-5-12
The doctor passed out prescriptions for drugs like Xanax and OxyContin, Vicodin and Adderall at a rate of 25 per day for three years, with only cursory patient examinations and a minimum of questions, authorities said.
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We're really losing pounds: How recession makes you thin... and it's mystifying the experts
dailymail.co.uk - 3-5-12
People are not only tightening their belts financially – obesity figures have fallen since the start of the recession.
A study has found that the number of people who have become dangerously overweight halved in the three years after the financial crisis of 2007.
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Metal hip replacements linked to cancer
telegraph.co.uk - 3-5-12
Controversial large metal-on-metal hip replacement joints should no longer be implanted in patients, surgeons have said, following evidence of links with cancer, poisoning and pain.
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'Spice' drug tied to kidney failure cases in Wyoming
msnbc.msn.com - 3-5-12
Three young people have been hospitalized with kidney failure and a dozen others sickened in Casper, Wyoming, in an outbreak linked to a batch of the designer drug Spice, authorities said on Friday.
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Diesel exhaust in mines linked to lung cancer
msnbc.msn.com - 3-5-12
There's new evidence that exposure to exhaust from diesel engines increases the risk of lung cancer.
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Warning Of Progressive Kidney Problems After Heart Surgery Via Blood And Urine Markers
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-5-12
Blood and urine markers can indicate which patients with an abrupt kidney injury following heart surgery will experience progressive kidney problems, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society Nephrology (JASN). Testing for these markers soon after surgery could help doctors protect the health of patients' kidneys.
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Obese Kidney Disease Patients Can Safely Undergo Weight-Loss Surgery
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-5-12
Weight-loss surgery is safe for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients who are obese, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society Nephrology (JASN). The study is the largest of its kind to focus on the impact of kidney function on patients' health following weight-loss surgery.
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Opioid-Induced Constipation In Critical Care Patients May Be Reduced By Methylnaltrexone
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-5-12
Opioids are a mainstay of care in the critical care unit, but their use frequently causes constipation which can lead to adverse outcomes including delayed feeding and later discharge from the ICU. Researchers from London, UK, and Chicago, IL, have found that methylnaltrexone (MNTX), a peripheral opioid antagonist, may restore bowel function in critically ill patients. Their retrospective study appears in the March issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.
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Heavy Kids May Not Respond as Well to Asthma Meds
healthday.com - 3-5-12
Overweight children may not respond as well to common asthma medicines known as inhaled corticosteroids, new research finds.
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Lifetime of healthy choices pays off later
upi.com - 3-5-12
Young adults who don't drink heavily, avoid tobacco, eat healthy, exercise and stay lean lower their risk of heart failure in middle-age, U.S. researchers say.
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Flu shot for seniors may not help much
upi.com - 3-5-12
Researchers in Canada found that the seasonal flu vaccine has not had a major impact in reducing hospitalization or death among the elderly.
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Sitting a lot raises women's diabetes risk
upi.com - 3-4-12
Women who sit for long periods daily are more prone to developing type 2 diabetes, but a similar link wasn't found in men, British researchers say.
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Rapid Flu Tests - How Accurate Are They?
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-4-12
Canadian researchers have examined the accuracy of rapid influenza diagnostic tests (RIDTs) in a meta-analysis of 159 studies. The results, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, revealed that although RIDTs can confirm the flu, they do not rule it out and that RIDTs are also better at identifying the influenza A virus, which is more common, than the influenza B virus. The results also showed that the accuracy of the tests is higher in children than in adults.
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Violence while expecting, parenting harder
upi.com - 3-4-12
Violence between couples during pregnancy makes parenting harder once a baby is born, U.S. researchers said.
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Medical marijuana status remains hazy in California
bostonherald.com - 3-4-12
Cities and medical marijuana providers, facing a series of conflicting rulings, are likely to remain in legal limbo until the California Supreme Court clarifies the ability of local governments to regulate patients’ pot, analysts said Friday.
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U.S. report: HIV rate down in needle-drug users
usatoday.com - 3-4-12
There's some good news from the AIDS front: Fewer needle drug users are testing positive for HIV.
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The first breath of a person
telegraph.co.uk - 3-4-12
They can’t articulate it, but newborns bristle with the urge for life.
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"SpeechJammer" Invention Stops A Person Talking Mid-Sentence
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-4-12
Two researchers in Japan have invented a "SpeechJammer" device that can stop a person talking in mid-sentence, by just projecting back to them "their own utterances at a delay of a few hundred milliseconds". The device does not stop them talking permanently, it is just that they become so confused, they can't finish their sentence and begin to stutter or just shut up.
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Infancy health risk linked to early birth by research
bbc.co.uk - 3-4-12
Babies born just a few weeks early have a slightly higher risk of health problems in infancy, research suggests.
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U.S. flu markers show steady increase
upi.com - 3-4-12
U.S. influenza is on the rise with widespread flu activity in California, Colorado, Illinois, Nevada, Oklahoma and Virginia, health officials said.
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Many Pilots, Truck Drivers Sleep-Deprived, Survey Finds
healthday.com - 3-4-12
One in 10 American truck drivers, train conductors, airline pilots and other transportation workers may be dangerously sleep-deprived, a new survey suggests.
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Smoke Exposure Late in Pregnancy Might Boost Baby's Eczema Risk
healthday.com - 3-4-12
A mother's exposure to tobacco smoke during the last three months of pregnancy may increase the risk that her child will develop the allergic skin condition eczema during infancy, a new study suggests.
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Bullying May Raise Risk of Suicidal Thoughts: Study
healthday.com - 3-3-12
Children involved in bullying are more likely than their peers to consider suicide by the time they are 11, a new study indicates.
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Cold Air May Raise Heart-Attack Risk During Exercise
healthday.com - 3-3-12
Breathing cold air during certain physical activities, such as shoveling snow, increases the body's demand for oxygen, which may put people with heart disease at greater risk for cardiac arrest or death, a new study finds.
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Young Puzzle-Solvers May Be Tomorrow's Engineers
healthday.com - 3-3-12
Playing with puzzles when they're 2 to 4 years old can help children develop better spatial skills, a new study indicates.
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Cocoa may help diabetes, heart failure
upi.com - 3-3-12
Patients with advanced heart failure and type 2 diabetes showed improvement after three months of consuming epicatechin-enriched cocoa, U.S. researchers said.
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Lose 4-5 lbs. by drinking water, not soda
upi.com - 3-3-12
Substituting water or diet soft drinks for drinks with calories can help people lose 4 to 5 pounds in six months, U.S. researchers suggested.
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Tortoise and the Hare: New Drug Stops Rushing Cancer Cells, Slow and Steady Healthy Cells Unharmed
sciencedaily.com - 3-3-12
The American Cancer Society estimates that 44,000 new cases of pancreatic cancer will be diagnosed this year and that 37,000 people will die from the disease. These are not strong odds. A new drug, rigosertib, allows pancreatic cancer cells to rush through replication -- and then stops them cold, killing them in in the middle of a step called M phase. Healthy cells that don't rush are unharmed.
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Lifestyle Choices Made in Your 20s Can Impact Your Heart Health in Your 40s
sciencedaily.com - 3-3-12
Maintaining a healthy lifestyle from young adulthood into your 40s is strongly associated with low cardiovascular disease risk in middle age, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study.
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Training Can Improve Memory and Increase Brain Activity in Mild Cognitive Impairment
sciencedaily.com - 3-3-12
If someone has trouble remembering where the car keys or the cheese grater are, new research shows that a memory training strategy can help. Memory training can even re-engage the hippocampus, part of the brain critical for memory formation, the results suggest.
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Finding unseen damage of traumatic brain injury
usatoday.com - 3-3-12
The soldier on the fringes of an explosion. The survivor of a car wreck. The football player who took yet another skull-rattling hit. Too often, only time can tell when a traumatic brain injury will leave lasting harm — there's no good way to diagnose the damage.
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Dude, where's my medicine? Prescription marijuana without the memory loss on the horizon
dailymail.co.uk - 3-3-12
Marijuana is commonly used for pain relief in many U.S states, but has regrettable side-effects such as making you forgetful.
Now scientists have pinpointed the part of the brain where the drug hinders working memory and discovered it is a separate area to where it has a medicinal effect.
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70-year-old looks 30 years younger thanks to raw food diet
thegrio.com - 3-3-12
Annette Larkins' backyard garden is full of fruits and vegetables. Every corner of her garden has something that is edible. She also collects rainwater to drink and water her plants. Annette says the food in her garden is her Fountain of Youth.
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6 Surprising Facts about Oysters
rodale.com - 3-3-12
Oysters are under threat, but follow these tips to help protect them and enjoy their amazing benefits, too.
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First Quadrivalent Vaccine Against Seasonal Flu Wins FDA Approval
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-3-12
On Wednesday, the US Food and Drug Administration announced it had approved FluMist Quadrivalent, a vaccine to prevent seasonal influenza in people aged 2 to 49 years. This is the first quadrivalent flu vaccine, that is one that contains four strains of flu virus, the agency has approved.
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Vegetables And Children - Openly Showing Them Is Better Than Hiding
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-3-12
Children are usually not too keen on eating their 'greens'. A Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revealed that just 21% of children eat the recommended 5 or more fruits and vegetables per day. Very few children ask to eat 'greens' and parents are trying all kinds of methods to persuade their children to eat their vegetables.
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Prenatal Exposure To Ecstasy Linked To Developmental Delays
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-3-12
For the first time, an international collaborative prospective study led by Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine demonstrates the impact of ecstasy, a widely used illegal stimulant and hallucinogen with the scientific name of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine or MDMA, on fetal and infant development. The study, published in the February issue of Neurotoxicology and Teratology shows that in pregnant women using ecstasy, the chemical signaling that determines the baby's gender is affected and that the drug contributes to developmental delays in infants.
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For Sleep Struggles, Women Urged to Alter Routines
healthday.com - 3-3-12
Driven to sleeplessness by the effects of stress and the demands of their own biology, women are more likely than men to have serious sleep problems, experts say.
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Smoking Linked to Higher Rate of Psoriasis: Study
healthday.com - 3-3-12
Smokers are at higher risk of developing the autoimmune skin condition psoriasis than nonsmokers, a new study finds, possibly because smoking pushes the body's immune system into overdrive, one expert suggests.
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Timing of Preemie Birth May Be Key to Kids' Health Later
healthday.com - 3-3-12
Preemies face a relatively unhealthy childhood when compared with full-term babies, and new British research suggests that the degree to which a child's health is compromised seems to depend on exactly how premature the child was.
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Prescription Meds Can Put on Unwanted Pounds
healthday.com - 3-3-12
Medications taken by millions of Americans for mood disorders, high blood pressure, diabetes and other chronic conditions can have an unhealthy side effect: weight gain.
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Effects of Environmental Toxicants Reach Down Through Generations
sciencedaily.com - 3-3-12
A Washington State University researcher has demonstrated that a variety of environmental toxicants can have negative effects on not just an exposed animal but the next three generations of its offspring.
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Drugs: 'New' Does Not Always Mean 'Better'
sciencedaily.com - 3-3-12
Cases in which a newly approved drug is more effective than the cheaper alternatives already available are the exceptions rather than the rule.
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Trans fat boosted risk of stroke
upi.com - 3-3-12
High trans fat intake was found to increase stroke risk for post-menopausal women, but aspirin appeared to lower the stroke risk, U.S. researchers found.
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Raw meat gets nutrition labeling
upi.com - 3-3-12
The U.S. government has required nutrition labeling since 1993 for products that are not raw, but as of Thursday, the labeling requirement includes raw meat.
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Rare diseases affect 25 million Americans
upi.com - 3-2-12
Inherited gene defects account for 80 percent of rare diseases, many of which affect vision, U.S. health official said.
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1-in-10 with AIDS in U.S. inject drugs
upi.com - 3-2-12
Despite a drop in U.S. HIV infections attributed to injecting drugs, 9 percent of U.S. HIV infections in 2009 occurred among such drug users, officials said.
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Vitamin D shrinks fibroid tumors in rats
upi.com - 3-2-12
Vitamin D reduced the size of uterine fibroids in rats predisposed to developing the benign tumors, U.S. researchers found.
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Health: Teen Speaks To CBS3 About Her Ability To Instantly Say Words Backwards
philadelphia.cbslocal.com - 3-2-12
It’s like an easy game for 14-year-old Alyssa Kramer. She can easily say words backwards in seconds. Her video on YouTube quickly got a million hits, and now she has her own channel: alyssatalkingback.com. CBS3 asked when she realized she had the special ability.
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Monsanto prevails in suit brought by organic growers
uk.reuters.com - 3-2-12
A federal judge has ruled in favor of global seed giant Monsanto Co, dismissing a lawsuit brought by a consortium of U.S. organic farmers and seed dealers who said their industry is at risk from Monsanto's growing market strength.
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Spanish Village Turns to Marijuana Farming to Meet Revenue Shortfall
foxnews.com - 3-2-12
A tiny Spanish village desperate for revenue has a novel plan to raise funds and create jobs: lease land to grow marijuana for pot smokers in the neighboring metropolis of Barcelona.
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Men who cheat on their other halves now have another worry to add to the possibility of their partner finding out - they are more likely to die during sex.
dailymail.co.uk - 3-2-12
Affairs are often with younger women in unfamiliar settings, which adds extra stress to the activity
Men who cheat on their other halves now have another worry to add to the possibility of their partner finding out - they are more likely to die during sex.
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Vitamin A may slash melanoma risk
msnbc.msn.com - 3-2-12
Vitamin A supplements could reduce the risk of developing the deadly skin cancer melanoma, according to a new study.
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Prevent Pet Poisonings: Eliminate the 10 Biggest Pet Threats in Your Home
rodale.com - 3-2-12
Here's how to ID the dangers, including a common chewing gum ingredient that can send your dog into tremors.
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Selenium Supplements May Harm Not Help
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-2-12
According to a recent study, published Online First in The Lancet, selenium may help people who don't have enough of it, but for the people who have enough to begin with, selenium supplements may be detrimental to their health. It is shown in the study that taking the supplements may result in the development of type 2 diabetes.
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Irregular Heartbeat Can Accelerate Mental Decline
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-2-12
About 350,000 Canadians suffer from atrial fibrillation, according to estimates of the Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation. A new study, in the current issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), shows a strong link between an irregular heartbeat or atrial fibrillation (AF), and a higher risk of dementia. The new study supports previous evidence that AF increases the risk of dementia amongst stroke survivors; however, it discovered that the link also applies to those with AF who have not suffered a stroke.
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Meditation Helps Memory Loss Patients
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-2-12
The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine reports that researchers from the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital have discovered that adults with memory impairment and memory loss may benefit from mantra-based meditation, which has a positive effect on people's emotional responses to stress, fatigue and anxiety.
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Sleep quality 'improves with age'
bbc.co.uk - 3-2-12
The belief that older people tend to suffer worse sleep may be false - in fact the reverse may be true, according to US researchers.
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Weight-Loss Surgery Seems Safe for Kidney Disease Patients
healthday.com - 3-2-12
Obese chronic kidney disease patients who undergo surgery to achieve weight loss do not face a particularly dangerous rate of complications as a result, a new study suggests.
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Stroke Risk Rises With Duration of Type 2 Diabetes: Study
healthday.com - 3-2-12
People who've had type 2 diabetes for more than 10 years are three times more likely to have a stroke than people without diabetes, new research suggests.
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Urban Forests Disappearing: Report
healthday.com - 3-2-12
An estimated 4 million trees are disappearing from urban areas in the United States each year, a new study found.
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Trans Fats May Raise Stroke Risk in Older Women
healthday.com - 3-2-12
Here's one more reason to avoid trans fats in your diet, especially if you are an older woman: A new study found a 39 percent increased risk of stroke among postmenopausal women who ate the highest amount of this common ingredient in baked goods, fast food and packaged products.
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How Marijuana Impairs Memory
sciencedaily.com - 3-2-12
A major downside of the medical use of marijuana is the drug's ill effects on working memory, the ability to transiently hold and process information for reasoning, comprehension and learning. Researchers reporting in the March 2 print issue of the Cell Press journal Cell provide new insight into the source of those memory lapses. The answer comes as quite a surprise: Marijuana's major psychoactive ingredient (THC) impairs memory independently of its direct effects on neurons. The side effects stem instead from the drug's action on astroglia, passive support cells long believed to play second fiddle to active neurons.
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Depression: An Evolutionary Byproduct of Immune System?
sciencedaily.com - 3-2-12
Depression is common enough -- afflicting one in ten adults in the United States -- that it seems the possibility of depression must be "hard-wired" into our brains. This has led biologists to propose several theories to account for how depression, or behaviors linked to it, can somehow offer an evolutionary advantage.
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Chinese herb regulates inflammation
upi.com - 3-2-12
U.S. scientists have discovered the molecular secrets behind a Chinese herb's extract made from Chang Shan, a type of hydrangea that grows in Tibet and Nepal.
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Most moms-to-be suffer morning sickness
upi.com - 3-2-12
An estimated 70 percent to 85 percent of all pregnant women experience nausea and vomiting, but nurse practitioners said only half report morning sickness.
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Parasitic worms offer hope of cure for multiple sclerosis
dailymail.co.uk - 3-1-12
Parasitic worms could offer hope to millions suffering from multiple sclerosis, say scientists.
Currently there is no cure for the neurological condition, but now researchers believe that a low dose of the Necator americanus - commonly known as the hookworm - may help relieve symptoms.
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Bugs in sterile drugs? Behind the shortage of critical meds
msnbc.msn.com - 3-1-12
In a move that highlights dilemmas plaguing the U.S. drug supply, federal regulators warned a major manufacturer about problems including bugs in vials of sterile drugs -- insects, literally -- the same day that health officials allowed the firm to ramp up scarce medications for kids with cancer.
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Want Healthy, Safe Seafood? Consult the Superfish List
rodale.com - 3-1-12
Confused about the best seafood choices? These "Super Green" fish are good for your health, free of contaminants, and without environmental downsides.
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Quitting Hormone Therapy May Lead To Tumor Regression In Breast Cancer
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-1-12
A new study suggests that quitting hormone therapy (HT) has an immediate effect on breast cancer rates, supporting the idea that stopping it leads to tumor regression. The researchers refute the suggestion that former HT users are less inclined to undergo mammography screening and that this explains the reductions in breast cancer diagnosis, because they found, if anything, former HT users are more likely to undergo the screening.
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Sugar makes up 16% of kids' daily diet
cnn.com - 3-1-12
About 16% of their daily calories come from sugar, according to a new report released Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics.
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Could a Statin Lower Your Risk for Depression?
healthday.com - 3-1-12
Patients who have heart disease and take cholesterol-lowering medicines known as statins are less likely to develop depression than those not on such drugs, a new study suggests.
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Alzheimer's-Like Memory Loss Reversed in Mice
healthday.com - 3-1-12
New research in mice suggests that Alzheimer's disease triggers a protein that contributes to the breakdown of the brain's memory.
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How Insects 'Remodel' Their Bodies Between Life Stages
sciencedaily.com - 3-1-12
It's one of life's special moments: a child finds a fat caterpillar, puts it in a jar with a twig and a few leaves, and awakens one day to find the caterpillar has disappeared and an elegant but apparently lifeless case now hangs from the twig.
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Open Your Eyes and Smell the Roses: Activating the Visual Cortex Improves Our Sense of Smell
sciencedaily.com - 3-1-12
A new study reveals for the first time that activating the brain's visual cortex with a small amount of electrical stimulation actually improves our sense of smell. The finding published in the Journal of Neuroscience by researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -- The Neuro, McGill University and the Monell Chemical Senses Center, Philadelphia, revises our understanding of the complex biology of the senses in the brain.
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Stopping Hormone Therapy Might Help Breast Cancer to Regress
sciencedaily.com - 3-1-12
As soon as women quit hormone therapy, their rates of new breast cancer decline, supporting the hypothesis that stopping hormones can lead to tumor regression, according to a report e-published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, & Prevention.
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AHA: Almonds good for heart
upi.com - 3-1-12
The American Heart Association certified almonds with its Heart-Check mark to signify to U.S. consumers they are a heart-healthy food, a trade group said.
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CDC Issues Warning About Nasal Washes
cbslocal.com - 3-1-12
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Jewish Health in Colorado both have issued a warning about nasal washes after two people have died from using tap water to do their sinus rinse.
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