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February, 2012 - Herbal and Health News

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Veterans' Affairs claim backlog at 800,000
upi.com - 2-29-12
Disabled American Veterans testified Tuesday in Washington that the Veterans' Affairs claims backlog has grown to 800,000 pending cases.
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Many erroneously think they are infertile
upi.com - 2-29-12
Nineteen percent of U.S. women ages 18-29 and 13 percent of men -- 3.2 million women, 2.6 million men -- said they are likely infertile, researchers said.
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FDA approves label changes for statins
upi.com - 2-29-12
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved safety label changes for statins -- a class of cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins, officials said.
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Recreational marijuana measure to be put to voters
chicagotribune.com - 2-29-12
Colorado voters will be asked to decide whether to legalize the recreational use of marijuana in a November ballot measure, setting up a potential showdown with the federal government over America's most commonly used illicit drug.
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Money Seems to Matter for Teen Girls, Condoms
abcnews.go.com - 2-29-12
Teen girls whose primary source of spending money comes from their boyfriends are less likely to use condoms, according to a new study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health.
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Roche: Fake Avastin contained several chemicals, no drug
usatoday.com - 2-29-12
Counterfeit versions of the popular cancer drug Avastin obtained by European regulators contain a variety of chemicals, but not the active ingredient found in the genuine drug, according to drugmaker Roche.
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Does Wii work? Study shows virtual boxing, bowling and dancing do not help children with exercise requirements
dailymail.co.uk - 2-29-12
They are billed as the perfect way to exercise and have fun, all without having to leave the comfort of your own living room.
But playing active video games won't help you stay fit, a study has found.
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How lefties, righties see the world differently
msnbc.msn.com - 2-29-12
Be careful next time you cast a vote. Your “handedness” might make you choose the wrong candidate, according to a research review published in Current Directions in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
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Trio of Chemicals Responsible for Major U.S. Brain Drain
rodale.com - 2-29-12
Premature births and ADHD have long been known causes of low IQ in children, but a new study recently found that exposure to common environmental contaminants could be even bigger causes behind a societal brain drain.
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How Added Sugar In Diet Leads To Obesity, Diabetes - New Clues About Fructose
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-29-12
A new animal study published on Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, offers new clues about the mechanism through which a diet high in fructose, such as from added sugar and high fructose corn syrup, may contribute to the development of obesity and diabetes.
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Sleeping Pills Tied To Higher Risk Of Death
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-29-12
Compared to never using sleeping pills, even using no more than 18 a year is tied to a more than threefold increased risk of death, according to researchers in the US who saw this result after controlling for every possible factor they could think of that might influence it. They also found a more than fourfold higher risk of death and a significant increase in cancer cases among regular pill users.
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Study: Brain suffers when fish oil falls short
cnn.com - 2-29-12
People with diets short on omega-3 fatty acids – the kind found in fish oil – were more likely to experience accelerated brain aging, a new study found.
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Many drugs 'non-vegetarian and need better labelling'
bbc.co.uk - 2-29-12
People who choose not to eat animal products may be unaware that common medicines could contain them, a study suggests.
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Rapid diagnostic test confirms flu
upi.com - 2-29-12
An analysis of the accuracy of rapid influenza diagnostic tests found they could be used to confirm the flu, but not rule it out, Canadian researchers said.
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Depressed girls more likely to binge eat
upi.com - 2-29-12
U.S. teenage girls who feel depressed are twice as likely to start binge eating, U.S. researchers found.
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Southerners most likely to be fatigued
upi.com - 2-29-12
A state-by-state sleep map revealed residents of Southern U.S. states suffer from the most sleep disturbances and daytime fatigue, researchers said.
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Child adversity may cause DNA changes
upi.com - 2-29-12
Childhood adversity might lead to DNA changes that increase the risk for psychiatric disorders, U.S. researchers said.
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Parents Often Right to Bring Kids With Fever to the ER: Study
healthday.com - 2-29-12
Many parents who bring their children to the emergency room with fevers are making the right decision, Dutch investigators report.
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Teens May Fare Worse After Concussion Than Children or Adults
healthday.com - 2-29-12
Teenagers who suffer a concussion are more sensitive than adults or children to its aftereffects, Canadian researchers report.
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Ecstasy Use During Pregnancy May Harm Fetus: Study
healthday.com - 2-29-12
Taking the hallucinogen ecstasy during pregnancy may harm the health of the fetus and lead to poorer motor control in infants, a new study suggests.
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Eat Your Broccoli: Another Mechanism Discovered by Which Sulforaphane Prevents Cancer
sciencedaily.com - 2-29-12
Researchers in the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University have discovered yet another reason why the "sulforaphane"compound in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables is so good for you -- it provides not just one, but two ways to prevent cancer through the complex mechanism of epigenetics.
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Cold Air Chills Heart's Oxygen Supply, Making Snow Shoveling Dangerous for Some People
sciencedaily.com - 2-29-12
People with heart disease may not be able to compensate for their bodies' higher demand for oxygen when inhaling cold air, according to Penn State researchers, making snow shoveling and other activities dangerous for some.
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Hyperactivity in Brain May Explain Multiple Symptoms of Depression
sciencedaily.com - 2-29-12
Most of us know what it means when it's said that someone is depressed. But commonly, true clinical depression brings with it a number of other symptoms. These can include anxiety, poor attention and concentration, memory issues, and sleep disturbances.
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Stress Changes How People Make Decisions
sciencedaily.com - 2-29-12
Trying to make a big decision while you're also preparing for a scary presentation? You might want to hold off on that. Feeling stressed changes how people weigh risk and reward. A new article published in Current Directions in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, reviews how, under stress, people pay more attention to the upside of a possible outcome.
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Sleeping pill users 'up to five times more likely to die early'
dailymail.co.uk - 2-29-12
Sleeping pills used by millions of Britons may increase the risk of early death more than five-fold, warn researchers.
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Progesterone vaginal gel nixed by FDA
upi.com - 2-28-12
Officials at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration denied approval for progesterone vaginal gel 8 percent -- used for the reduction of risk of preterm birth.
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Reporter’s Notebook: Hope for Halting Macular Degeneration’s March
abcnews.go.com - 2-28-12
I grew up acutely aware that good vision is precious.
In 1971, at age 46, my mother lost the sight in her right eye from a blood clot in the retina. It happened within minutes, and over the years, glaucoma and cataracts took their toll, although she continued plowing through murder mysteries with what she called her “good eye.”
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Autism not diagnosed as early in minority children
usatoday.com - 2-28-12
Early diagnosis is considered key for autism, but minority children tend to be diagnosed later than white children. Some new work is beginning to try to uncover why — and to raise awareness of the warning signs so more parents know they can seek help even for a toddler.
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Survey: Hawaiians have highest well-being
usatoday.com - 2-28-12
Hawaii already lays claim to natural beauty. Now it comes out on top in a new ranking of which state's residents have the best sense of overall well-being, based on physical health, happiness, job satisfaction and other factors that affect quality of life.
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The great cereal scandal: One of Britain’s leading consumer experts reveals the shocking truth about sugary breakfast cereals
dailymail.co.uk - 2-28-12
The food industry’s biggest con trick is one you’re probably falling for every day of the week. Even worse, the victims are your children. Visit any supermarket and wander down the aisle of breakfast cereals. The message from the packets couldn’t be more encouraging.
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How to 'steam clean' your lungs back to life
dailymail.co.uk - 2-28-12
A blast of steam that scalds the lungs may provide relief to patients with breathing disorders such as emphysema. New research shows that the 30-minute procedure can improve lung function and reduce breathlessness — as a result patients are also able to exercise more easily.
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Attending meetings lowers IQ: research
telegraph.co.uk - 2-28-12
Meetings make people stupid because they impair their ability to think for themselves, scientists have found.
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Another batch of birth control pills recalled
msnbc.msn.com - 2-28-12
Glenmark Generics is issuing a nationwide recall of seven lots of birth control pills. The pills are labeled "norgestimate and ethinyl estradiol tablets."
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Yoga for babies: Is it safe?
msnbc.msn.com - 2-28-12
They may not be able to walk or talk, but they have no problem arching their bodies into the downward dog pose. Yes, toddlers and babies are doing yoga — studios now offer classes for kids as young as 6 weeks old.
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Why Women Shouldn't Eat Factory Farmed Chicken
rodale.com - 2-28-12
More than just a food-safety threat, contaminated chicken has been pegged as the culprit in a common uncomfortable condition.
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TAK-875 For Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-28-12
A study published Online First in The Lancet, states that TAK-875, a new medicine used for treating type 2 diabetes, is a safe way to improve the control of blood pressure and is said to have minimal risk of low blood sugar. However, there are some side effects.
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Virtual Colonoscopy Just As Good For Seniors As Standard Procedure
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-28-12
A new study led by a doctor from the Mayo Clinic in Arizona in the US, finds that "virtual colonoscopy", known more formally as computerized tomographic CT colonography, is comparable to standard colonoscopy for people aged 65 and over. The American College of Radiology Imaging Network study was published online before print on 23 February in the journal Radiology.
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Earlier Studies That Linked Specific Genes To Intelligence Were Largely Wrong, Harvard Researchers Find
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-28-12
For decades, scientists have understood that there is a genetic component to intelligence, but a new Harvard study has found both that most of the genes thought to be linked to intelligence are probably not in fact related to it, and identifying intelligence's specific genetic roots may still be a long way off.
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Dental Pulp Stem Cells Transformed By 'Bad Breath' Chemical
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-28-12
Japanese scientists have found that the odorous compound responsible for halitosis - otherwise known as bad breath - is ideal for harvesting stem cells taken from human dental pulp.
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Child motor neurone disease treatment clue
bbc.co.uk - 2-28-12
Scottish research has shown it could be possible to reverse the muscle damage seen in children with a form of motor neurone disease.
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Unlimited human eggs 'potential' for fertility treatment
bbc.co.uk - 2-28-12
It may be possible to one day create an "unlimited" supply of human eggs to aid fertility treatment, US doctors say.
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High heels main cause of toenail pain
upi.com - 2-28-12
High heels and/or pointed-toe shoes are a leading cause of ingrown toenails, which cause not only pain, but can lead to infection, a U.S. podiatrist says.
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Sleeping Pills Linked to Raised Risk of Death, Cancer: Study
healthday.com - 2-28-12
Prescription sleeping pills may help you get some much needed rest at night, but using them routinely might also make it more likely that you will die or develop certain types of cancer, research suggests.
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'Chemo Brain' May Linger 20 Years After Breast Cancer Treatment
healthday.com - 2-28-12
"Chemo brain," the name given to the mental fog and related memory problems that can occur during and after chemotherapy, may last for two decades after breast cancer treatment, new research suggests.
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Stents No Better Than Medicine for Stable Heart Disease, Study Says
healthday.com - 2-28-12
Many people with stable heart disease undergo an expensive artery-opening procedure when medication would work just as well, a new study suggests.
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Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Protect the Aging Brain
healthday.com - 2-28-12
Middle-aged and elderly adults who regularly eat foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids may slow the mental decline that leads to dementia, according to a new study.
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'Universal' Vaccines Could Finally Allow for Wide-Scale Flu Prevention
sciencedaily.com - 2-28-12
An emerging class of long-lasting flu vaccines could do more than just save people the trouble of an annual flu shot.
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Research Offers Insight to How Fructose Causes Obesity and Other Illness
sciencedaily.com - 2-28-12
A group of scientists from across the world have come together in a just-published study that provides new insights into how fructose causes obesity and metabolic syndrome, more commonly known as diabetes. In this study which was performed in lab animals, researchers found that fructose can be metabolized by an enzyme that exists in two forms. One form appears to be responsible for causing how fructose causes fatty liver, obesity, and insulin resistance. The other form may actually protect animals from developing these features in response to sugar.
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Cost may not be barrier to eating produce
upi.com - 2-27-12
The amount of servings of fruit and vegetables people eat has less to do with price and more to do with shopping experience, U.S. researchers found.
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Weight affected by some medications
upi.com - 2-27-12
Weight gain or loss may not always be caused by diet and exercise; it could be affected by medications, a U.S. pharmacist said.
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Male Y chromosome extinction theory challenged
bbc.co.uk - 2-27-12
Men may not become extinct after all, according to a new study.
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Mendocino Marijuana Truce Ended By Federal Warning
huffingtonpost.com - 2-27-12
Residents of Mendocino County, the redwood and marijuana-rich territory in California's fabled Emerald Triangle, thought they had reached detente in the decades-old clash between pot growers and local law enforcement two years ago when the sheriff agreed to stop raiding medical cannabis producers who paid to have their crops inspected.
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Crackdown on painkiller epidemic hurts legitimate patients
usatoday.com - 2-27-12
When Antoinette Tortorella's doctor took her off narcotics in January because she would not agree to a spinal implant, she decided to get a new doctor.
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How Long Will Your Love Last? Check Your Oxytocin
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 2-27-12
Just how long a relationship will last can be predicted by the amount of "love hormone" in the bloodstream of a newly smitten person, a new study says.
Researchers measured levels of oxytocin in people who had recently begun relationships. Six months later, the couples with the higher levels of oxytocin tended to still be together, while the others had split.
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Nursing a broken heart? How taking a paracetamol could dull the pain of rejection
dailymail.co.uk - 2-27-12
It's what songwriters have been saying for years, and now scientists agree – love really does hurt.
But what the ballads don’t tell us is that a simple dose of paracetamol could help ease the pain of a broken heart.
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Condom use 101: Basic errors are so common, study finds
msnbc.msn.com - 2-27-12
Condoms can't prevent unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease if they're used incorrectly. Unfortunately, a new review of research finds that condom use errors are all too common.
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A whiff of rosemary gives your brain a boost
msnbc.msn.com - 2-27-12
Could the smell of rosemary enhance your time on a crossword puzzle? It's possible, according to a new study.
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Potential Link Between Colorectal Cancer Risk, Obesity And Alcohol Consumption
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-27-12
A case-control study from Newfoundland/Labrador has reported that greater alcohol intake may increase the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) among obese subjects, but not among non-obese subjects. This is not a particularly large study, and only 45-60% of subjects who were recruited by telephone ended up providing data. Further, it is a case-control comparison, rather than a cohort analysis, making bias in the results more likely.
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Bisphenol A Exposure Increases Risk Of Future Onset Of Heart Disease
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-27-12
Bisphenol A (BPA) is a controversial chemical widely used in the plastics industry. A new study followed people over a 10-year time period and shows that healthy people with higher urine concentrations of BPA were more likely to later develop heart disease.
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How Vitamin D Inhibits Inflammation
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-27-12
Researchers at National Jewish Health have discovered specific molecular and signaling events by which vitamin D inhibits inflammation. In their experiments, they showed that low levels of Vitamin D, comparable to levels found in millions of people, failed to inhibit the inflammatory cascade, while levels considered adequate did inhibit inflammatory signaling. They reported their results in the March 1, 2011, issue of The Journal of Immunology.
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Stem Cell Finding Could Expand Women's Lifetime Supply of Eggs
healthday.com - 2-27-12
Researchers report that they've isolated stem cells from adult human ovaries that can mature into eggs that may be capable of fertilization.
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Advancing Personalized Medicine: Tailoring Drugs to Fit a Patient's Genetic Predisposition
sciencedaily.com - 2-27-12
The RIKEN Center for Genomic Medicine is examining how drugs can be matched to a patient's genetic information through the study of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Taisei Mushiroda from the Laboratory for Pharmacogenetics explains...
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Weight affected by some medications
upi.com - 2-27-12
Weight gain or loss may not always be caused by diet and exercise; it could be affected by medications, a U.S. pharmacist said.
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Supplements may help skin of smokers
upi.com - 2-26-12
Antioxidants, vitamins and omega-3 fatty acids may help the skin of smokers to appear younger, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Patients to get more access to records
upi.com - 2-26-12
Stage 2 of the Electronic Health Record Incentive programs involve new standards for online access for patients to their records, a U.S. health official said.
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Fitness program for mentally ill expands
usatoday.com - 2-26-12
Back when he was a self-described friendless recluse, Craig Carey spent hours sitting in a chair doing nothing or driving around in his car, alone. Then a fitness program for people with serious mental illness turned his life around.
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Target heart rate formula made especially for women
usatoday.com - 2-26-12
Target heart rates for fitness and heart health need a change, says Ohio State University Medical Center cardiologist Martha Gulati.
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The Truth About Omega-3 Fatty Acids
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 2-26-12
Omega-3 fatty acids may come from fish, but there's nothing fishy about their disease-fighting qualities, especially when it comes to your heart.
Omega-3s fall into a category of fat called polyunsaturated fatty acids, and very generally, these are healthier than saturated fats.
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How walking the dog can be harmful to your health: 'Man's best friend' may cause high number of injuries
dailymail.co.uk - 2-26-12
The regular walks and companionship that come with owning a dog are known to aid fitness and wellbeing.
But it turns out that man’s best friend may be more likely to harm health than help it.
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Cat scratch disease may be safe in pregnancy
msnbc.msn.com - 2-26-12
The largest-ever review of outcomes for pregnant women with cat scratch disease -- including just eight cases -- suggests the infection is not damaging to babies, but its authors say there are too few instances to glean any definitive answers.
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Oscar psychology: Why celebrities fascinate us
msnbc.msn.com - 2-26-12
From the Oscar's red carpet to the tabloids lining supermarket checkout lines, celebrity obsession is everywhere. Even the most casual moviegoer might find him or herself flipping through a slideshow of Academy Award fashion after the big event. So why do we fixate on celebrities?
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Genes That Enable Diagnosis Of Age-Related Macular Degeneration
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-26-12
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide, especially in developed countries, and there is currently no known treatment or cure or for the vast majority of AMD patients. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Genome Medicine has identified genes whose expression levels can identify people with AMD, as well as tell apart AMD subtypes.
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Detecting Down Syndrome Risk - Noninvasive Method Efficient and Accurate
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-26-12
Two studies published online, ahead of the April issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology (AJOG), show that the risk of a fetus having chromosomal abnormalities that cause Down syndrome, and a genetic disorder known as Edwards syndrome, can now be almost precisely be identified by using a noninvasive test on maternal blood that involves a novel biochemical assay and a new algorithm for analysis.
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U.S.: Pa. farmer can't distribute raw milk
upi.com - 2-26-12
A federal court granted a permanent injunction preventing a Pennsylvania farmer from distributing raw milk and raw milk products across state lines.
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Video Games, Impulsivity Seem to Go Hand-in-Hand
healthday.com - 2-26-12
Too much time spent playing video games may lead to impulsive behavior and attention problems in children, and vice versa, according to a new study.
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Significant State-By-State Differences in Black, White Life Expectancy
sciencedaily.com - 2-26-12
A UCLA-led group of researchers tracing disparities in life expectancy between blacks and whites in the U.S. has found that white males live about seven years longer on average than African American men and that white women live more than five years longer than their black counterparts.
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3 New Dangerous Drug Habits in Teens
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 2-25-12
It's well-known that teens experiment with illegal substances such as alcohol and marijuana. But recently, children and teens have turned their attention to substances found at home or local convenience stores. They're abusing parents' prescription painkillers, energy drinks and computer cleaners.
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Why Synthetic Marijuana Is More Dangerous Than the Real Thing
livescience.com - 2-25-12
Synthetic marijuana, or "fake" pot, is nothing like the real thing. It's legal, and easily accessible to kids.
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We All Scream for Ice Cream, But Can We Become Addicted?
abcnews.go.com - 2-25-12
There are people who say that for them, food is like a drug, and a new study suggests that high-calorie foods like ice cream can affect the brain in some of the ways drugs do.
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Sudden OCD in kids? Culprit may be strep throat, other infections
msnbc.msn.com - 2-25-12
For Kelly Wooldridge of St. Louis, the change in her son’s behavior was so abrupt, it was like someone flipped a switch.
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Survival Circuits In Animal Brains: What Can They Tell Us About Human Emotion?
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-25-12
New York University neuroscientist Joseph LeDoux, author of "The Emotional Brain", has come up with a new theory called "the survival circuit concept" that he outlines in Wednesday's issue of the journal Neuron. He suggests that instead of asking whether the feelings and emotions we humans experience are also present in other animals, we should ask to what extent the survival circuits present in other animals are also present in humans, and then consider how they contribute to emotions.
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Antipsychotics death risk charted in dementia patients
bbc.co.uk - 2-25-12
Some antipsychotic medication may increase the risk of death in patients with dementia more than others, according to US research.
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U.S. birth count dropping
upi.com - 2-25-12
The provisional count of U.S. births for the 12-month period ending June 2011 was 3,978,000 -- or 2 percent lower than the year before -- health officials said.
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Brain Calls the Shots on Which Hand Holds Cellphone
healthday.com - 2-25-12
About 70 percent of people hold their cellphone to the ear on the same side as their dominant hand, a new study finds.
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Young Blacks Less Likely to Seek Mental Health Care: Study
healthday.com - 2-25-12
Young adult black Americans, especially those with higher levels of education, are much less likely than their white counterparts to seek mental health services, a new study finds.
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Dieting Can Prove Dangerous for Kidney Disease Patients
healthday.com - 2-25-12
Overweight or obese people with chronic kidney disease may suffer further kidney damage if they use certain weight-loss methods, a new study warns.
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Memory Formation Triggered by Stem Cell Development
sciencedaily.com - 2-25-12
Researchers at the RIKEN-MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics have discovered an answer to the long-standing mystery of how brain cells can both remember new memories while also maintaining older ones. They found that specific neurons in a brain region called the dentate gyrus serve distinct roles in memory formation depending on whether the neural stem cells that produced them were of old versus young age.
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Bird flu may not be as deadly as thought
upi.com - 2-25-12
Death rates reported in past studies that estimated bird flu killed more than half of those infected may be inaccurate, U.S. researchers say.
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Well-off in U.S. anxious about old age
upi.com - 2-25-12
Nearly 80 percent of U.S. adults with assets of $250,000 or more said the cost of healthcare is their top financial worry in retirement, a survey indicated.
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Slow carb chemical may help heart
upi.com - 2-25-12
Slow carbohydrates such as eggs, meat, legumes, lentils, broccoli and peas may affect a blood chemical linked to heart disease, U.S researchers said.
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USDA to Give Monsanto’s New GMO Crops Special ‘Speed Approval’
naturalsociety.com - 2-25-12
If you thought Monsanto’s lack of testing on their current GMO crops was bad before, prepare to now be blown away by the latest statement by the USDA. Despite links to organ damage and mutated insects, the USDA says that it is changing the rules so that genetically modified seed companies like Monsanto will get ‘speedier regulatory reviews’. With the faster reviews, there will be even less time spent on evaluating the potential dangers. Why? Because Monsanto is losing sales with longer approval terms.
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Driving Under The Influence Of Marijuana - 1 In 5 Teens Have Done It
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-24-12
19% of teenagers in the USA say they have driven a car while under the influence of marijuana, compared to 13% who say they have driven after consuming alcohol, according to a new report issued by SADD (Students Against Destructive Decisions) and commissioned by Liberty Mutual Insurance. The authors added that marijuana use among 12-graders is at its highest level in three decades.
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Nasty, contagious norovirus is 'everywhere' now
usatoday.com - 2-24-12
It has been a busy season for the "stomach flu," that nasty, highly contagious bug that has led officials from California to Washington, D.C., to close schools, issue alerts and launch massive cleaning efforts.
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5 Experts Answer: Is Caffeine Bad for Kids?
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 2-24-12
This week, we asked doctors: Does caffeine harm kids?
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Doctor who discovered hepatitis C creates universal vaccine to prevent liver disease that kills 15,000 a year in the U.S.
dailymail.co.uk - 2-24-12
The scientist who discovered hepatitis C in 1989 says he has now created a vaccine against the liver-destroying virus.
Michael Houghton, from the University of Alberta, said the vaccine was developed from a single strain but is effective against all known strains of the disease.
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Heart patients told 'drugs most effective if you take them before you get out of bed'
dailymail.co.uk - 2-24-12
Doctors have always known that heart attacks are more common in the morning, but have never understood why.
Now a team from the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston found the first molecular proof that the heart has an internal 'biological clock', which increases the risk of a type of fatal heart attack in the morning.
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Advanced melanoma drug nearly doubles survival time
msnbc.msn.com - 2-24-12
Zelboraf, a drug used to treat advanced cases of the deadly skin cancer melanoma, nearly doubles the length of patients' lives, a new study has found.
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Heart Attack - Why Do So Many Wait So Long?
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-24-12
Researchers in the School of Nursing at Yale University in the US are setting up a survey to find out why so many people often wait several hours following a heart attack before seeking medical help. This is of concern because all the evidence points to the fact that treatment is most effective when the heart attack sufferer gets medical attention in the first hour of experiencing symptoms.
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Immune System Drives Male Attractiveness
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-24-12
Adult males with strong immune systems are seen as more sexually attractive to females, researchers from the University of Abertay Dundee, Scotland, wrote in the journal Nature Communications. They added that a strong immune system plays a greater role in attracting women to men, than great bodies or muscles.
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Let's talk about sex... even if it's not easy
cnn.com - 2-24-12
As a sexuality counselor, a big part of my work is to facilitate a dialogue between couples who have often waited far too long to discuss a sex issue.
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Certain Antipsychotics Up Risk of Death for Patients With Dementia: Study
healthday.com - 2-24-12
Compared to other antipsychotic drugs, haloperidol (Haldol) raises the risk of death in elderly patients with dementia, a new study finds.
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Citrus Fruits May Lower Women's Stroke Risk
healthday.com - 2-24-12
Eating oranges and other citrus fruits may help reduce stroke risk, new research suggests.
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If You're Afraid of Spiders, They Seem Bigger: Phobia's Effect On Perception of Feared Object Allows Fear to Persist
sciencedaily.com - 2-24-12
The more afraid a person is of a spider, the bigger that individual perceives the spider to be, new research suggests.
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Bisphenol A Exposure Linked to Increased Risk of Future Onset of Heart Disease
sciencedaily.com - 2-24-12
Bisphenol A (BPA) is a controversial chemical widely used in the plastics industry. A new study followed people over a 10-year time period and shows that healthy people with higher urine concentrations of BPA were more likely to later develop heart disease. But researchers "can't be certain that BPA itself is responsible" -- more research needed to determine whether the link is causal.
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How Vitamin D Inhibits Inflammation
sciencedaily.com - 2-24-12
Researchers at National Jewish Health have discovered specific molecular and signaling events by which vitamin D inhibits inflammation. In their experiments, they showed that low levels of Vitamin D, comparable to levels found in millions of people, failed to inhibit the inflammatory cascade, while levels considered adequate did inhibit inflammatory signaling. They reported their results in the March 1, 2012, issue of The Journal of Immunology.
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U.S.: Chemicals kill bathtub refinishers
upi.com - 2-24-12
U.S. workplace health investigators identified more than 12 deaths in the last 12 years associated with the use of stripping products in bathtub refinishing.
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Bird flu cases more common than thought: study
breitbart.com - 2-24-12
Bird flu is believed to be a rare disease that kills more than half of the people it infects, but a US study out Thursday suggests it may be more common and less lethal than previously thought.
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Study: 1-of-6 U.S.surgeons abuse alcohol
upi.com - 2-23-12
More than 15 percent of U.S. surgeons in an anonymous survey self-reported disorders consistent with alcohol abuse or dependence, researchers said.
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Pasteurized milk 150 times more contaminated with blood, pus and feces than fresh milk - videos the CDC won't show you
naturalnews.com - 2-23-12
The vaccine-pushing, disease scare-mongering agency known as the CDC has put out a stunning piece of propaganda attacking fresh milk (raw dairy), claiming it is "150 times more dangerous" than pasteurized milk. This is all part of their anti-American agenda to crush food freedom and criminalize fundamental farming practices upon which this very nation was founded. (Yes, George Washington and the founding fathers drank raw milk, grew hemp and even smoked a little weed as medicine.)
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Synthetic Marijuana: A New Clear and Present Danger
huffingtonpost.com - 2-23-12
The 911 call placed on behalf of Demi Moore last month suggested the actress may have endured a highly-negative reaction to synthetic marijuana, also known as K2, or Spice.
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Health officials warn of mercury in skin cream
usatoday.com - 2-23-12
California health officials sent out a medical alert earlier this month after tracing the mercury poisoning of a 39-year-old Alameda County woman to an illegal skin-lightening cream smuggled in from Mexico.
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New drugs offer hope for rheumatoid arthritis
usatoday.com - 2-23-12
Unbeknownst to many, rheumatoid arthritis is a disorder that can extend far beyond the joints.
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Citrus Fruits Lower Women's Stroke Risk
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 2-23-12
A diet rich in citrus fruits, such as oranges and grapefruits, may reduce women's risk of stroke, a new study says.
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Discovered: The 'insomnia' gene that means you sleep two-thirds less than normal (... and don't live as long)
dailymail.co.uk - 2-23-12
An 'insomnia gene' has been discovered by scientists.
Experiments on fruit flies found those carrying a mutation in the protein slept two thirds less than normal - and also had much shorter lifespans.
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Can't get your baby to sleep? Breastfeeding mothers may pass on caffeine in coffee through their milk
dailymail.co.uk - 2-23-12
Mothers who are struggling to get their babies to sleep should consider how much caffeine they are consuming, according to a breast feeding expert.
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45 Good Reasons to Ditch Junk Food
rodale.com - 2-23-12
Phosphate food additives could be triggering a host of health problems. But unless you really read labels, you'd have no idea they're hiding in your food.
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Fake Drugs Increasing On The Net And Finding Their Way Into Legitimate Supplies
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-23-12
Fake drugs are increasingly being sold on the Internet in a global counterfeit medicines market that has doubled in the last five years to more than $75 million. The medicines, many of which are life-threatening, have even turned up in the legitimate supply chain and found their way into pharmacies, according a review by Dr Graham Jackson and colleagues published in the March issue of the IJCP, the International Journal of Clinical Practice.
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Close Contact With Rodents Is A Health Hazard
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-23-12
A case report published in the February 20 issue of the Medical Journal of Australia, reveals that a 26-year-old woman from Adelaide who enjoyed cuddling and kissing her pet rats contracted Streptobacillus moniliformis infection (rat bite fever). The disease is potentially fatal and could become more prevalent as rodent ownership increases.
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Migraines May Raise a Woman's Odds of Depression
healthday.com - 2-23-12
As if the debilitating headaches weren't bad enough, women who get migraines or have had them in the past are at increased risk for depression, a new study suggests.
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Toddlers With Angry Parents May Have More Temper Tantrums
healthday.com - 2-23-12
Toddlers are more likely to become easily upset and act out if their parents anger quickly and overreact to their children's behavior, according to a new study.
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Is There a General Motivation Center in the Depths of the Brain?
sciencedaily.com - 2-23-12
A team coordinated by Mathias Pessiglione, Inserm researcher at the "Centre de recherche en neurosciences de la Pitié Salpêtrière" (Inserm/UPMC-Université Pierre and Marie Curie/CNRS) have identified the part of the brain driving motivation during actions that combine physical and mental effort: the ventral striatum.
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Heart Beats to the Rhythm of a Circadian Clock
sciencedaily.com - 2-23-12
Sudden cardiac death -catastrophic and unexpected fatal heart stoppage -- is more likely to occur shortly after waking in the morning and in the late night.
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Newly Identified Oral Bacterium Linked to Heart Disease and Meningitis
sciencedaily.com - 2-23-12
A novel bacterium, thought to be a common inhabitant of the oral cavity, has the potential to cause serious disease if it enters the bloodstream, according to a study in the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. Its identification will allow scientists to work out how it causes disease and evaluate the risk that it poses.
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Fried Food Risks: Toxic Aldehydes Detected in Reheated Oil
sciencedaily.com - 2-23-12
Researchers from the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU, Spain) have been the first to discover the presence of certain aldehydes in food, which are believed to be related to some neurodegenerative diseases and some types of cancer. These toxic compounds can be found in some oils, such as sunflower oil, when heated at a suitable temperature for frying.
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Brain of infants with autism differs
upi.com - 2-23-12
Children later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders have distinct patterns of brain development in the first two years of life, U.S. researchers said.
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Cold bath may help muscles after exercise
upi.com - 2-23-12
A cold-water bath might reduce muscle soreness after exercise but it is unclear whether there may be harmful side effects, researchers in Northern Ireland said.
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Cancer test using blood shows promise
upi.com - 2-22-12
A simple test using a teaspoon of blood might provide early detection of many types of cancer, researchers in Israel said.
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Replacement found for cancer drug Doxil, in short supply
usatoday.com - 2-22-12
Patients with ovarian cancer and other deadly tumors will regain access to an important chemotherapy drug, Food and Drug Administration officials told USA TODAY in an exclusive interview Monday.
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Hepatitis C deaths up, Boomers most at risk
usatoday.com - 2-22-12
Deaths from liver-destroying hepatitis C are on the rise, and new data shows baby boomers especially should take heed — they are most at risk.
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Losing weight is twice as hard as you may think... cutting calories slows down your body's metabolism
dailymail.co.uk - 2-22-12
IF you are on a diet, look away now. Losing weight is twice as hard as thought, scientists said last night. After factoring in how metabolism slows down as we shed pounds, they announced that dieters’ expectations have been too high.
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Can some children simply 'grow out' of autism? One mother tells how her son's life has been transformed
dailymail.co.uk - 2-22-12
When Josh Tutin was three years old, he was diagnosed with autism so severe that experts believed it unlikely he would ever relate to other people. Yet now the Bristol boy is a thoughtful, joyful nine-year-old who attends a mainstream school.
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What Causes Leg Pain?
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-22-12
Leg pain refers to any kind of pain that occurs between the heels and the pelvis. There are many reasons for leg pain, and not all of them are caused by a problem that originates in the leg; some injuries or spinal problems can cause aches and pains in the leg(s).
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Stress Increases 40% During Recessions
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-22-12
According to a study conducted by researchers at the University of Nottingham and University of Ulster, work related stress increases by 40% during a recession, affecting 1 in 4 workers. Furthermore, researchers found that the number of workers who take time off, as a result of work-related stress, increased by 25%, and that total time off, as result of this type of stress, rose by more than one third during an economic downturn. The study is published today in the scientific journal, Occupational Medicine.
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Is Lung Function Improved By Deep Brain Stimulation?
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-22-12
A study in the February issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, reveals that deep brain stimulation (DBS), commonly used to treat individuals with movement disorders or chronic pain, also affects respiratory function. Lead researcher of the study was Dr. Jonathan A. Hyam of University of Oxford, United Kingdom. DBS is a surgical treatment in which a small electrode is implanted in the brain. The electrode sends electrical impulses to stimulate specific parts of the brain, in order to interrupt abnormal brain activity.
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Motor Skills Affected By Autism
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-22-12
Often, children with autism have difficulties developing motor skills, such as throwing a ball, learning how to write, or running. However, a study published in the journal Autism, suggests that autism itself, not genetics, may be to blame. The research was conducted at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
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FDA continues to fight drug shortages in U.S.
cnn.com - 2-22-12
In response to President Obama's executive order to help prevent future drug shortages, the Food and Drug Administration Tuesday announced a series of steps to increase the supply of two critically needed cancer drugs: Methotrexate, a drug used to treat children with leukemia and some adult cancers, and Doxil, used to treat numerous forms of cancer from lung to ovarian. Doxil is also used in AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma and multiple myeloma.
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Women more likely to die in the hospital after a heart attack, study finds
cnn.com - 2-22-12
Nearly every 34 seconds someone in the United States has a heart attack, according to the American Heart Association. In fact, heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women in the U.S.
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Many Women Having a Heart Attack Don't Have Chest Pain
healthday.com - 2-22-12
Two out of five women having a heart attack do not experience chest pain, according to a new study.
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Kidney Damage Greatly Raises Diabetics' Risk for Death
healthday.com - 2-22-12
People with type 2 diabetes have a higher risk of death than people without the disease, but a new study suggests that if they also have kidney damage their risk of dying is even greater.
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Aspirin as Good as Plavix for Poor Leg Circulation: Study
healthday.com - 2-22-12
Aspirin works as well as Plavix in patients with blocked leg arteries, a new European study finds.
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Over-Reactive Parenting Linked to Negative Emotions and Problem Behavior in Toddlers
sciencedaily.com - 2-22-12
Researchers have found that parents who anger easily and over-react are more likely to have toddlers who act out and become upset easily.
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Can Consuming Caffeine While Breastfeeding Harm Your Baby?
sciencedaily.com - 2-22-12
Babies are not able to metabolize or excrete caffeine very well, so a breastfeeding mother's consumption of caffeine may lead to caffeine accumulation and symptoms such as wakefulness and irritability, according to an interview with expert Ruth Lawrence, MD, published in Journal of Caffeine Research, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
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Environmental Pollutant Level During Pregnancy Linked With Grown Daughters Who Are Overweight
sciencedaily.com - 2-22-12
The levels of the environmental pollutant perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) that mothers had in their blood during pregnancy increased the risk of obesity in their daughters at 20 years of age. The findings come from a recent study of Danish women in which the Norwegian Institute of Public Health participated.
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Step Forward in Effort to Regenerate Damaged Nerves
sciencedaily.com - 2-22-12
The carnage evident in disasters like car wrecks or wartime battles is oftentimes mirrored within the bodies of the people involved. A severe wound can leave blood vessels and nerves severed, bones broken, and cellular wreckage strewn throughout the body -- a debris field within the body itself.
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Survey: U.S. Jews have highest well-being
upi.com - 2-22-12
Jews and Mormons report a higher well-being than other U.S. faith groups, while those with no religious identity had the lowest well-being, a survey indicated.
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Ways to help prevent type 2 diabetes
upi.com - 2-22-12
Diabetes affects about 26 million in the United States, but the older people get, the higher their risk of being diagnosed with diabetes, officials say.
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Mild dehydration can affect mood, thinking
upi.com - 2-21-12
Even mild dehydration can alter a person's mood, energy level and ability to think clearly, but the effect might be more acute in women, U.S. researchers said.
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Man Trapped In Car for Two Months in Sub-Zero Temperatures Survives By 'Hibernating Like a Bear'
myfoxdc.com - 2-21-12
A Swedish man who was found alive after spending two months trapped in a car in freezing temperatures survived by eating snow and hibernating "like a bear," according to one theory.
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The World's Hottest Pepper: Brings Pleasure and Pain Relief
abcnews.go.com - 2-21-12
Barrus, 37, doesn't actually breathe fire, but his main hobby is sampling extremely hot peppers that make his mouth seem as if it's on fire. His latest sampling is the Trinidad Moruga Scorpion, the pepper recently named world's hottest by researchers at the New Mexico State University's Chile Pepper Institute.
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Gluten Intolerance: When Is It a Full-Blown Allergy?
abcnews.go.com - 2-21-12
Store aisles, markets, bakeries, blogs and books are stocked with food ideas for going gluten-free. The gluten-free diet has become popular for combating a full-blown gluten allergy known as celiac disease, or more popularly for those with no allergy at all as a means to lose weight and enhance athletic performance.
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Super avocado could help combat antibiotic-resistant infections in hospitals
dailymail.co.uk - 2-21-12
A Chilean avocado may contain the secret to fighting aggressive, antibiotic-resistant infections in hospitals all over the world.
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Arsenic in Organics: Where the News Reports Went Wrong
rodale.com - 2-21-12
Organic rice is being targeting for arsenic contamination, but the truth is arsenic—along with tons of other toxic compounds—is in conventional foods, too.
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"DNA Origami" Robots Target Cancer Cells
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-21-12
Using a technique called "DNA origami", US scientists have made programmable molecule-transporting nanorobots that can seek out particular cell targets and deliver specific instructions for them to follow. One example of such use could be to tell cancer cells to destroy themselves. The researchers write about their findings in Friday's online issue of Science.
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Muscle Soreness - Is Cold Water Immersion Effective For Treatment?
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-21-12
A recent study, published in The Cochrane Library, reveals that after exercise, a cold bath may be an effective way to prevent and help sore muscles. However, the researchers are not positive whether there may be dangerous side effects that could affect the person later on.
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Kids who veer from gender norms at higher risk for abuse
cnn.com - 2-21-12
When a boy struts in a tutu or a girl dons boxer shorts, it makes grown-ups nervous. It's one of the first lessons kids who are gender nonconforming learn.
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Chain of cat feces can harm humans, sea otters
cnn.com - 2-21-12
There's more to cat excrement than meets the eye, and it may have the potential to cause disease in sea otters and humans alike.
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Pancreatic cancer: Trial drug MRK003 shows promise
bbc.co.uk - 2-21-12
Scientists say they may have found a new weapon against pancreatic cancer after promising early trial results of an experimental drug combination.
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Hepatitis C Now Kills More Americans Than HIV
healthday.com - 2-21-12
Deaths from hepatitis C have increased steadily in the United States in recent years, in part because many people don't know they have disease, a new government report says.
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Study Links Colic in Infants to Migraines in Moms
healthday.com - 2-21-12
Experts are beginning to believe some that some non-headache health problems in childhood -- such as vomiting and vertigo -- might be linked to migraines later in life. Now, a new study suggests a connection between mothers with migraines and colic in infancy.
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Fructose No Worse Than Other Sugars for Weight Gain: Study
healthday.com - 2-21-12
The common food and beverage sweetener fructose often gets a bad rap when it comes to causing weight gain, but a new study suggests that it may not be any worse for putting on pounds than other sugars.
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Rainforest Plant Combats Multi-Resistant Bacterial Strains
sciencedaily.com - 2-21-12
Aggressive infections in hospitals are an increasing health problem worldwide. The development of bacterial resistance is alarming. Now a young Danish scientist has found a natural substance in a Chilean rainforest plant that effectively supports the effect of traditional treatment with antibiotics.
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New Brain Connections Form in Clusters During Learning
sciencedaily.com - 2-21-12
New connections between brain cells emerge in clusters in the brain as animals learn to perform a new task, according to a study published in Nature on February 19 (advance online publication). Led by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, the study reveals details of how brain circuits are rewired during the formation of new motor memories.
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College education delays marriage
upi.com - 2-21-12
Young U.S. adults who study to get a bachelor's degree tend to delay marriage versus those who don't go to college, researchers said.
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Experts fear diseases 'impossible to treat'
independent.co.uk - 2-20-12
Britain is facing a "massive" rise in antibiotic-resistant blood poisoning caused by the bacterium E.coli – bringing closer the spectre of diseases that are impossible to treat.
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Teen driver deaths up 11 percent for 2011
upi.com - 2-20-12
For the first time in eight years, 16- and 17-year-old driver deaths increased from 190 to 211, an 11 percent increase, U.S. officials said.
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People losing sleep over social media
upi.com - 2-20-12
Millions of Britons are losing sleep because they are updating or checking status updates on Facebook or tweeting, a survey indicated.
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Scientists prepare test-tube burger
ft.com - 2-20-12
The world’s first test-tube hamburger, created in a Dutch laboratory by growing muscle fibres from bovine stem cells, will be ready to grill in October, scientists believe.
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Test tube hamburgers to be served this year
telegraph.co.uk - 2-20-12
The world's first test tube hamburger will be served up this October after scientists perfected the art of growing beef in the lab.
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Checklist can tell if toddlers' language skills are up to scratch
telegraph.co.uk - 2-20-12
By comparing their child's speaking ability against a checklist of 310 basic words, parents could determine whether they are at risk of language-related difficulties that last into adulthood.
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Fasting once a week could help you live longer
telegraph.co.uk - 2-20-12
Not eating at all for one or two days a week may protect against Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other degenerative brain conditons, a team from the National Institute on Ageing in Baltimore, America found.
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Mom's Mental Health Affects Baby's Language Development
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 2-20-12
Both having depression and taking antidepressants during pregnancy may affect an infant's language development, new research suggests.
Study results reveal that a crucial language development period, during which infants learn to tune in to the sounds of their native language, is sped up when women take antidepressants, and prolonged when a woman has depression.
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'Grief is not a mental illness that should be treated with pills': Doctors hit back at creeping medicalisation of life events
dailymail.co.uk - 2-20-12
Grief is not a mental illness that should be treated with anti-depressants, experts say.
In an unsigned editorial in the influential medical journal The Lancet, experts argue that grief does not require psychiatrists and that 'legitimising' the treatment of grief with antidepressants 'is not only dangerously simplistic, but also flawed.'
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Studies: Health risk from toxic pavement sealant greater than previously believed
msnbc.msn.com - 2-20-12
When you think of pollution, you might picture an industrial center like Camden, N.J., or Jersey City. But new research shows that when it comes to a potent class of cancer-causing toxic chemicals, many American parking lots are a lot worse.
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Alcohol Used By Fruit Flies As A Drug To Kill Parasites
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-20-12
Fruit flies infected with a blood-borne parasite consume alcohol to self-medicate, a behavior that greatly increases their survival rate, an Emory University study finds.
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When Body Clock Runs Down, Immune System Takes Time Off
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-20-12
The circadian clock is a finely tuned genetic mechanism that regulates our sleep cycle and key metabolic changes during the 24-hour cycle. It also may help determine whether we get sick or not, according to a new Yale School of Medicine study published online in the journal Immunity.
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Scientists Reveal The Secret Of Sperm Quality Control
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-20-12
Yale researchers have discovered how the "guardian of the genome'' oversees quality control in the production of sperm - and perhaps in many other cells as well.
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Gene Might Boost Risk for Obesity
healthday.com - 2-20-12
A new animal study suggests that a genetic mutation could put certain people at higher risk for becoming obese if they eat high-fat diets.
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11 Surprising Sex-Drive Killers
rodale.com - 2-19-12
Feeling a little lackluster in the libido department this Valentine's Day? You're not alone. Americans' sex drives are plummeting, thanks to many chemicals and ingredients added to our food, medicines, shower gels, and even sex toys! Get your hormones back on track and rev up your sex drive by eliminating the top sex-drive killers that lurk in your home.
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Pesticide Company Convicted of Poisoning Farmer
rodale.com - 2-19-12
A chemical corporation is in hot water in France for allegedly maiming a farmer. As the organic market surges, chemical farming faces mounting problems. The latest industrial farming setback comes with a French court's conviction of Monsanto—the chemical giant that sells genetically engineered seeds, Roundup, and other pesticides—of poisoning a farmer.
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Alzheimer's drug may damage brain wiring
upi.com - 2-19-12
Alzheimer's drugs currently being tested in clinical trials might hurt wiring in the brain and nervous system, U.S. researchers said.
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Italians seeing increase in health issues
upi.com - 2-19-12
An increasing number of Italians face serious health issues brought on by sedentary lifestyles, smoking and drinking, Italy's Higher Health Institute said.
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Couples should not compete on who has had worse day: research
telegraph.co.uk - 2-19-12
Couples who compete over who has had the worse day or bombard the family with their workplace problems may be on the road to divorce, experts have warned.
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Qnexa Obesity Drug - FDA Concerned About Long-term Side Effects
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-19-12
The FDA has expressed concerned regarding obesity drug Qnexa - a combination of phentermine and topiramate - and what associations there may be between long-term usage and birth defect risks, as well as its impact on the heart. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reviewing Qnexa again, after turning down its submission for approval two years ago ("FDA Turns Down Weight Loss Drug Qnexa, But Makers See Short Timeline For Approval").
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Disrupted Body Clock Weakens Immunity
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-19-12
A new study published this week in the journal Immunity suggests that when our body clock is disrupted, it weakens the immune system. We already know that the circadian clock is a finely tuned genetic mechanism that regulates body functions that follow a 24-hour cycle, such as sleep patterns and metabolism. Now, researchers at Yale School of Medicine in the US show it may also influence our vulnerability to disease through its effect on the immune system.
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Brain scans in infants shed light on autism onset
cnn.com - 2-19-12
New research provides evidence that wiring in the brains of children with autism differs from typically developing children as early as six months of age, according to a study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry on Friday.
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Bird Flu Studies Can Be Published After All: WHO
healthday.com - 2-19-12
Research on a mutated, more contagious form of the bird flu virus can be published in full, the World Health Organization announced Friday, despite concerns that bioterrorists could use the information to start a pandemic.
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Brain Scans Might Spot Autism as Early as 6 Months of Age
healthday.com - 2-19-12
In children as young as 6 months old, changes in the brain that can lead to autism spectrum disorder may have already begun, preliminary research suggests.
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Nasty 'Superbug' Emerging? Strikes Otherwise Healthy, Young Patients
sciencedaily.com - 2-19-12
University at Buffalo researchers are expressing concern about a new, under-recognized, much more potent variant of a common bacterium that has surfaced in the U.S.
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College students in more abuse admissions
upi.com - 2-19-12
U.S. college students have a significantly higher rate of admissions for alcohol problems than their non-student counterparts, federal health officials found.
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It take almost an hour to work off soda
upi.com - 2-19-12
Most U.S. teens don't know how long it takes to work off calories in a soda, but once they know, they drink more water instead, researchers said.
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Barack Obama's Hardline Turn on Medical Marijuana is a Mystery
motherjones.com - 2-18-12
Over at Rolling Stone, Tim Dickinson has a good piece about the Obama administration's sudden about-face on medical marijuana. Initially they made soothing noises and announced that they wouldn't target pot dispensaries that complied with state law. Then, last year, everything changed:
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Ron Paul: Why Can’t We ‘Put Into Our Body Whatever We Want?’
seattle.cbslocal.com - 2-18-12
Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul decried the “war on drugs” Thursday night, telling supporters in Washington state that people should be able to make their own decisions on such matters.
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Deadly bird flu studies to stay secret for now -WHO
reuters.com - 2-18-12
Two studies showing how scientists mutated H5N1 bird flu into a virus that could create a human pandemic will be made public eventually, but a moratorium will remain for biosecurity officials to assess the risks, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Friday.
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The boy with spray-on skin: Two-year-old horrifically scalded by spilt cup of tea makes amazing recovery after pioneering surgery
dailymail.co.uk - 2-18-12
A brave toddler who suffered horrific burns after knocking over a cup of tea has made a remarkable recovery after doctors sprayed him with a new layer of skin. Two-year-old Zed Merrick was left with second-degree burns across his chest and shoulder after a steaming cup of tea fell off a kitchen worktop at his home in Lincolnshire.
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Want an asthma-free child? Get a pet while you are pregnant
dailymail.co.uk - 2-18-12
Mothers who spend time with pets during their pregnancy are less likely to have children with allergies and asthma, a study has revealed.
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Playing video games 'improves eyesight'
telegraph.co.uk - 2-18-12
Playing video games could improve the eyesight of people born with conditions that cause lifelong visual difficulties, researchers claim.
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All infant Tylenol recalled due to new bottle flaw
msnbc.msn.com - 2-18-12
Johnson & Johnson said it was recalling its entire U.S. supply of infant Tylenol after parents complained about problems with a new dosing system, the latest in a string of recalls for the healthcare giant.
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Study questions antidepressant-suicide link
msnbc.msn.com - 2-18-12
The Food and Drug Administration has a blanket warning on antidepressant medications stating they increase the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors among kids and young adults, but a new review of clinical data finds no link between suicide and at least two of the medications.
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Entire Genome Of Neandertal Relative Decoded From Finger Bone Fragment
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-18-12
Working with just a fragment of a finger bone, German scientists have decoded the entire genome of an extinct human identified as a member of the Denisovans, an Asian group related to the Neandertals. Together, the Denisovans and the Neandertals are our closest extinct relatives. The scientists believe their genome is of such high quality it has fewer errors than most sequences of modern-day humans. They published the genome on the internet this week.
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Vicious cycle of sleep apnea and obesity in kids
cnn.com - 2-18-12
The classic pediatric sleep apnea patient is a skinny 6-year-old with chronic congestion and dark circles under his eyes.
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Body clock 'alters' immune system
bbc.co.uk - 2-18-12
The time of the day could be an important factor in the risk of getting an infection, according to researchers in the US.
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CDC: Painkiller overdoses an epidemic
upi.com - 2-18-12
About 15,000 people die each year from prescription painkiller overdoses -- more than those who die from heroin and cocaine combined -- U.S. officials said.
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Brain Scans Might Spot Autism as Early as 6 Months of Age
sciencedaily.com - 2-18-12
In children as young as 6 months old, changes in the brain that can lead to autism spectrum disorder may have already begun, preliminary research suggests.
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Living to 100 May Be Tougher Than You Think
sciencedaily.com - 2-18-12
Decades-old assumptions about the odds of reaching very old age may be wrong, which could put 100 out of reach for many seniors, a new study finds.
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Is Grief an Illness? The Debate Heats Up
sciencedaily.com - 2-18-12
The loss of a loved one can trigger deep emotional turmoil, but is the grief that follows a normal part of being human or is it a form of mental illness in need of diagnosis and treatment?
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More Neighborhood Bars Linked to Domestic Violence
sciencedaily.com - 2-18-12
Having a high number of bars or pubs in a neighborhood is associated with visits to hospital emergency departments due to domestic violence, a new study finds.
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Eating Fish May Help Ward Off Colon Polyps in Women
sciencedaily.com - 2-18-12
Eating at least three servings of fish a week may reduce women's risk of developing some types of colon polyps, according to a new study.
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Military Service, Even Without Combat, Can Change Personality and Make Vets Less Agreeable, Research Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 2-18-12
It's no secret that battlefield trauma can leave veterans with deep emotional scars that impact their ability to function in civilian life. But new research led by Washington University in St. Louis suggests that military service, even without combat, has a subtle lingering effect on a man's personality, making it potentially more difficult for veterans to get along with friends, family and co-workers.
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First case of Legionnaire's disease found at a dentist
breitbart.com - 2-17-12
Doctors on Friday reported the first known case of Legionnaire's disease, a rare infection usually linked to faulty air conditioning and hot-water systems, that was caused by a visit to the dentist.
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Rio faces dengue epidemic: Brazil health minister
breitbart.com - 2-17-12
Brazilian Health Minister Alexandre Padilla on Thursday warned that Rio de Janeiro faced a major dengue epidemic, although he said the virus strain prevalent was not fatal.
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7.5 million U.S. kids live with alcoholic
upi.com - 2-17-12
About 7.5 million U.S. children age 18 and under lived with a parent who has experienced an alcohol use disorder in the past year, health officials said.
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Puzzles boost learning math-related skills
upi.com - 2-17-12
Some parents will buy any high-tech toy if they think it will help their child, but U.S. researchers said puzzles help children with math-related skills.
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Medical marijuana activists hope to put pressure on Obama
denverpost.com - 2-17-12
Activists upset by what they see as the Obama administration's increasingly aggressive posture toward the medical-marijuana industry hope to fight back during this year's presidential campaign.
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Counterfeit drugs becoming big business worldwide
usatoday.com - 2-17-12
The discovery that a fake version of the widely used cancer medicine Avastin is circulating in the United States is raising new fears that the multibillion-dollar drug-counterfeiting trade is increasingly making inroads in the U.S.
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Antibiotics are no more effective in treating sinus infections than over-the-counter drugs, says study
dailymail.co.uk - 2-17-12
A new study will only add to the misery of millions suffering painful symptoms of sinus infection: antibiotics do little to alleviate the problem. The study, published in the latest version of the Journal of the American Medical Association, adds weight to the long-held belief that GPs' willingness to prescribe antibiotics increased infections' resistance to drugs.
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'Cancer-causing' chemical used in plastics and food containers can also lead to obesity and diabetes, says study
dailymail.co.uk - 2-17-12
Fast food and a sedentary lifestyle is often blamed for the modern-day rise in obesity... but another more common and hidden cause has been uncovered. A chemical widely used in plastics and food-can lining - which has been linked to cancer and labelled a toxic substance in Canada - has now been linked to weight gain and diabetes.
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Not sleeping enough CAN damage your immune system and make you ill, says study
dailymail.co.uk - 2-17-12
Regularly staying up late, or having a disrupted sleep pattern, leaves us open to infection and illness, according to new research.
Our immune system is linked to our sleep cycle, and will be damaged if regular sleep patterns are disturbed.
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Online Medieval Fantasy Games -- Threat to Marital Bliss?
healthday.com - 2-17-12
Marital harmony may be in short supply in households where one partner is immersed in online games such as World of Warcraft, Lord of the Rings and Guild Wars, new research suggests.
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Lupus, Rheumatoid Arthritis Linked to Fertility Woes, Miscarriage
healthday.com - 2-17-12
Women with rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus often have fewer children than they'd hoped for, according to a new study.
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Arsenic Might Be Found in Some Organic Foods: Study
healthday.com - 2-17-12
A sweetener used in many organic foods may be a hidden source of arsenic, a new study suggests.
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U.S. Teen Driving Deaths Up: Report
healthday.com - 2-17-12
The number of American teens who lost their lives in car accidents jumped 11 percent in the first half of 2011, the first increase in eight years, a new report finds.
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Common Flame Retardant Linked to Social, Behavioral and Learning Deficits
sciencedaily.com - 2-17-12
Mice genetically engineered to be susceptible to autism-like behaviors that were exposed to a common flame retardant were less fertile and their offspring were smaller, less sociable and demonstrated marked deficits in learning and long-term memory when compared with the offspring of normal unexposed mice, a study by researchers at UC Davis has found. The researchers said the study is the first to link genetics and epigenetics with exposure to a flame retardant chemical.
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Red produce boosts health year-round
upi.com - 2-17-12
Red fruit and vegetables are always popular for Valentine's Day but a U.S. food expert said they are also some of the healthiest produce to eat all year long.
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Slow walking 'predicts dementia'
bbc.co.uk - 2-17-12
The speed someone walks may predict the likelihood of developing dementia later in life, according to researchers in the US.
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People who have trouble sleeping twice as likely to suffer memory problems in old age
dailymail.co.uk - 2-16-12
People who have trouble sleeping are more likely to suffer memory problems when they are older, according to a new study.
Scientists found the amount and quality of sleep people get at night may affect their your memory later in life.
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How secure are labs handling world's deadliest pathogens?
msnbc.msn.com - 2-16-12
To reach his office in Galveston National Laboratory, where scientists study deadly pathogens such as the Ebola and Marburg viruses, director James Le Duc swipes his key card at the building's single entrance, which is guarded 24/7 by Texas state police.
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Antibiotic Amoxicillin No Better than Placebo for Most Sinus Infections
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-16-12
If you have a sinus infection, taking a course of amoxicillin, an antibiotic medication, does not help you recover faster or reduce symptoms any more effectively than taking an inactive placebo, according to a new study by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, that is published in the 15 February issue of JAMA.
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Gut Bacteria May Have Role In Obesity
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-16-12
A new animal study published in this month's issue of the Journal of Proteome Research suggests that bacteria living in the large intestine may play a role in obesity by slowing down the activity of energy-burning brown fat. The researchers said their findings could spur new ways to prevent obesity and promote weight loss, for example by pointing to new drug targets and microbial treatments.
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What’s in Your Lipstick? FDA Finds Lead in 400 Shades
healthland.time.com - 2-16-12
Your favorite shade of Marilyn Monroe red may contain lead, according to a recently updated test of lipstick by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The agency found that 400 popular lipsticks contained trace amounts of the toxin.
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Bacteria used to fight sleeping sickness
bbc.co.uk - 2-16-12
Scientists believe they have found a way to beat sleeping sickness using a bacterium against the tsetse fly host that spreads the disease to humans.
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E. Coli in Chicken Linked to Urinary Tract Infections
healthday.com - 2-16-12
Scientists have long believed that urinary tract infections are typically caused by a person's own E. coli bacteria, but a new Canadian study suggests the bacteria may more often than not come from chickens.
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New Blood Thinner May Prevent Blood Clots During Cancer Treatment
healthday.com - 2-16-12
A new blood-thinning medication called semuloparin reduces the risk of blood clots in people undergoing certain cancer treatments, new research shows.
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Diabetes May Start in the Intestines, Research Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 2-16-12
Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have made a surprising discovery about the origin of diabetes. Their research suggests that problems controlling blood sugar -- the hallmark of diabetes -- may begin in the intestines.
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Children May Have Highest Exposure to Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles, Found in Candy and Other Products
sciencedaily.com - 2-16-12
Children may be receiving the highest exposure to nanoparticles of titanium dioxide in candy, which they eat in amounts much larger than adults, according to a new study. Published in ACS' journal, Environmental Science & Technology, it provides the first broadly based information on amounts of the nanomaterial -- a source of concern with regard to its potential health and environmental effects -- in a wide range of consumer goods.
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Teen dating violence meant to assert power
upi.com - 2-16-12
A teen dating partner can prove to be abusive rather than affectionate as a way to assert power in a relationship, a U.S. psychologist said.
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Four top reasons why dieting is so hard
upi.com - 2-16-12
Two-thirds of Americans say they are on a diet to improve their health but relatively few are actually decreasing in size, a U.S. expert says.
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Couples in 'the zone' talking are happier
upi.com - 2-15-12
Young U.S. adults who easily engage in rewarding conversations with their partners are more likely to be satisfied with the relationship, U.S. researchers said.
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$4 billion recovered in '11 Medicare fraud
upi.com - 2-15-12
The U.S. government's healthcare fraud prevention and enforcement efforts recovered about $4 billion in taxpayer dollars in Fiscal Year 2011, officials said.
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Pregnant women should cut fat intake
upi.com - 2-15-12
Pregnant women need to watch their diet, what they eat can affect both their baby and themselves, a U.S. researcher said.
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Colo. considers banking for medical marijuana shops
usatoday.com - 2-15-12
Medical marijuana is legal in 17 U.S. states, but the industry has a decidedly black-market aspect: It's mostly cash only.
Banks won't touch marijuana money. The drug is illegal under federal law, and processing transactions or investments with marijuana money puts federally insured banks at risk of drug-racketeering charges.
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MIT: China's pollution costs $112B in annual health care
usatoday.com - 2-15-12
China's unprecedented growth is carrying a steadily steeper price tag as its air pollution hikes the nation's health care costs, finds a new study by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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Eat bananas when they're green and potatoes when they're cold
dailymail.co.uk - 2-15-12
The type of food you heap on to your plate is not the only thing you need to think about. How you cook, prepare or eat it can dramatically affect its health benefits. Here, dietitian Juliette Kellow reveals the best ways to serve popular kitchen staples...
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Be careful what you say! Babies learn meaning of words months earlier than first thought
dailymail.co.uk - 2-15-12
Proud parents have long suspected that behind their baby’s gurgling lies a mind that is keen and sharp.
And now scientists have confirmed that those as young as six months can understand a wide vocabulary, and that if parents speak to them normally it could improve their language skills later on.
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Mediterranean Diet Reduces Small Vessel Damage In The Brain
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-15-12
The February issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals, carries a report this month on the Mediterranean diet. It appears that a Mediterranean-style diet reduces the burden of white matter hyperintesity volume. White matter hyperintesity volume is a marker of small vessel damage in the brain.
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Air Pollution Tied To Cognitive Decline, Stroke
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-15-12
Two studies published in the Archives of Internal Medicine on Monday suggest that air pollution at levels experienced by most Americans or considered safe by the Environmental Protection Agency is linked to higher risk of cognitive decline and stroke.
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US firm Monsanto 'guilty' in France poisoning case
bbc.co.uk - 2-15-12
A French court has found the US biotech giant Monsanto legally responsible for the poisoning of a farmer who inhaled a powerful weedkiller.
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Stem cells used to 'heal' heart attack scars
bbc.co.uk - 2-15-12
Damage caused by a heart attack has been healed using stem cells gathered from the patient's own heart, according to doctors in the US.
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Bullying a Strong Risk Factor for Suicide in Gay Youth: Study
healthday.com - 2-15-12
New research confirms the trend of disturbing headlines that have appeared in media reports in the past two years:
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Lost Love Often the Biggest Source of Regret, Study Shows
healthday.com - 2-15-12
Valentine's Day is the holiday that celebrates love, so be sure to show it because a new study suggests love that's lost causes the greatest regret of all.
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Switching to Water, Diet Drinks Linked to Modest Weight Loss
healthday.com - 2-15-12
People who drank water or diet beverages instead of calorie-laden drinks lost 4 to 5 pounds over half a year, according to new research.
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Teens With Autism Preoccupied With TV, Video Games: Study
healthday.com - 2-15-12
When given the opportunity to have screen time, children with autism spectrum disorders typically choose television and video games over social interactive media, such as email, a new study finds .
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Babies weaned on finger foods less fat
upi.com - 2-15-12
Babies weaned using solid finger food are more likely to develop healthier food preferences than those who are spoon-fed pureed food, British researchers say.
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Breakfast with dessert helps weight loss
upi.com - 2-15-12
Dieters might be able to have their cake and eat it too -- researchers in Israel found a sweet dessert at breakfast contributed to weight loss.
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A third of U.S. singles expect sex on Valentine's Day
upi.com - 2-15-12
A poll of men and women using a dating app on Facebook or cellphones found about one-third of U.S. singles expect to have sex on Valentine's Day.
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Rejection can lower heart rate
upi.com - 2-15-12
Learning that someone doesn't like you triggers a drop in heart rate, University of Amsterdam researchers found.
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A kiss can trigger food, drug allergy
upi.com - 2-15-12
Brushing teeth or waiting hours after eating may not prevent some with food or medicine allergies from triggering a reaction with a kiss, U.S. allergists said.
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'Thank you' may pacify warring couples
upi.com - 2-15-12
Couples should use Valentine's Day to spend more time focusing on the positive aspects of their relationship and not complaints, two U.S. psychiatrists said.
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Feds shut down Amish farm for selling fresh milk
washingtontimes.com - 2-15-12
The FDA won its two-year fight to shut down an Amish farmer who was selling fresh raw milk to eager consumers in the Washington, D.C., region after a judge this month banned Daniel Allgyer from selling his milk across state lines and he told his customers he would shut down his farm altogether.
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Gum disease may be cause of bad breath
upi.com - 2-14-12
U.S. periodontists are treating gum disease-related bad breath with laser gum therapy -- making Valentine's Day a little bit easier for kissing.
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Whitney Houston's Death: Substance Abuse May Have Played Role
abcnews.go.com - 2-14-12
Although full details surrounding Whitney Houston's death are not yet known, forensic experts not involved with the case speculate that the singer may have died from an accidental overdose.
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Why love really is a drug: How romance triggers response in same part of brain as narcotics
dailymail.co.uk - 2-14-12
It is often said that love is a drug.
But romance really does work in a similar way to addiction to illegal substances – it triggers a reaction in the same part of the brain, scientists have revealed.
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Silver surfer daters 'more honest'
telegraph.co.uk - 2-14-12
Over-60s are more likely than younger singletons to use realistic photos when looking for love online, according to research indicating that "silver surfers" are the fastest growing group of internet daters.
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Wider Waistlines Linked to Memory Problems in HIV Patients
healthday.com - 2-14-12
HIV-positive patients with larger waistlines may be at greater risk for memory problems, according to a new study. Exposure to combinations of certain anti-HIV drugs could play a role in this reduced mental function, researchers said.
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Smog May Harm Women's Brains: Study
healthday.com - 2-14-12
A lifetime's exposure to air pollution may contribute to mental decline in older women, a new study says.
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Mediterranean Diet Might Be Healthier for Brain
healthday.com - 2-14-12
Eating a Mediterranean-style diet appears to reduce damage to small blood vessels in the brain, a new study says.
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Mom's Vitamin D Levels Linked to Language Problems in Kids
healthday.com - 2-14-12
Pregnant women with low levels of vitamin D may be putting their children at risk for language difficulties, Australian researchers report.
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Compound May Help in Fight Against Antibiotic-Resistant Superbugs
sciencedaily.com - 2-14-12
North Carolina State University chemists have created a compound that makes existing antibiotics 16 times more effective against recently discovered antibiotic-resistant "superbugs."
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Motivation to Exercise Affects Behavior
sciencedaily.com - 2-14-12
For many people, the motivation to exercise fluctuates from week to week, and these fluctuations predict whether they will be physically active, according to researchers at Penn State. In an effort to understand how the motivation to exercise is linked to behavior, the researchers examined college students' intentions to be physically active as well as their actual activity levels.
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CDC Warns Untreatable Gonorrhea is On the Way
usnews.com - 2-14-12
Gonorrhea, one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in the United States, is increasingly showing resistance to one of the last known effective antibiotic treatments, leading researchers from the Centers for Disease Control to "sound the alarm" about potentially untreatable forms of the disease.
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Valentine's Day can be 'tipping point'
upi.com - 2-14-12
A relationship counselor in Ireland warns many relationships break up after the stress of Valentine's Day.
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Valentine's gifts may be hazardous to pets
upi.com - 2-14-12
Many of the more traditional Valentine's Day gifts can be harmful to pets, especially chocolate, U.S. pet experts said.
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Mystery disease kills thousands in Central America
ap.org - 2-14-12
Jesus Ignacio Flores started working when he was 16, laboring long hours on construction sites and in the fields of his country's biggest sugar plantation.
Three years ago his kidneys started to fail and flooded his body with toxins. He became too weak to work, wracked by cramps, headaches and vomiting.
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7 walnuts a day deliver health benefits
upi.com - 2-13-12
Walnuts may be considered the king of nuts for health benefits, with a combination of more healthful and higher quality antioxidants, U.S. researchers say.
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Non-invasive way found to treat aneurysms
upi.com - 2-13-12
Life-threatening aneurysms can be treated non-invasively with a catheter threaded through blood vessels up to the brain, a U.S. neurosurgeon said.
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FDA outlines path for lower-priced biotech drugs
usatoday.com - 2-13-12
The Food and Drug Administration is preparing to review the first lower-cost versions of biotech drugs, expensive medications which have never before faced generic competition.
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Baby Boomers' demand, expectations for new knees soar
usatoday.com - 2-13-12
A soaring demand for new knees from aging Baby Boomers wanting to dance through Zumba workouts or zip down ski slopes is likely to lead to additional, more costly surgeries, according to a new report.
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Specific Goals In Nutrition Needed To Improve Diabetes Diet
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-13-12
A specific goal to eat a set number of daily servings of low-glycemic-index foods can improve dietary habits of people with Type 2 diabetes, according to new research.
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Dishonest doctors: Why physicians lie
cnn.com - 2-13-12
The doctor-patient relationship is a complex one. It occurs at a stressful and busy time for both the patient and the doctor. Because it involves at least two humans, there are usually at least three versions of the conversation: the doctor's, the patient's and the true version.
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Immune cells use 'starvation tactics' on HIV
bbc.co.uk - 2-13-12
Scientists have shown how some cells in the body can repel attacks from HIV by starving the virus of the building blocks of life.
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Medical marijuana spray legal in Sweden
upi.com - 2-13-12
Medical marijuana was approved as a prescription medicine for the treatment of multiple sclerosis in Sweden, officials said.
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Overeating May Double Risk of Memory Loss: Study
healthday.com - 2-13-12
Older people who eat too much are at risk for memory impairment, a new study contends.
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Complex Wiring of the Nervous System May Rely On a Just a Handful of Genes and Proteins
sciencedaily.com - 2-13-12
Researchers at the Salk Institute have discovered a startling feature of early brain development that helps to explain how complex neuron wiring patterns are programmed using just a handful of critical genes. The findings, published in Cell, may help scientists develop new therapies for neurological disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and provide insight into certain cancers.
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Older daters don't want to play games
upi.com - 2-13-12
Older Americans, the fastest-growing demographic in online dating, are looking for different traits in a date than their younger counterparts, researchers say.
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Valentine's can be triple threat to diet
upi.com - 2-13-12
People feeling happy might make a Valentine's Day dinner of salmon and vegetables, but the depressed might just reach for a bag of candy, a U.S. expert said.
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These foods have super powers vs. diabetes
usatoday.com - 2-13-12
The American Diabetes Association offers this list of 10 "superfoods" that people with diabetes may want to consider incorporating into their diets:
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'Starvation tactics' used on HIV
bbc.co.uk - 2-13-12
Scientists have shown how some cells in the body can repel attacks from HIV by starving the virus of the building blocks of life.
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Molecular Secrets of Ancient Chinese Herbal Remedy Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 2-13-12
For roughly two thousand years, Chinese herbalists have treated Malaria using a root extract, commonly known as Chang Shan, from a type of hydrangea that grows in Tibet and Nepal. More recent studies suggest that halofuginone, a compound derived from this extract's bioactive ingredient, could be used to treat many autoimmune disorders as well. Now, researchers from the Harvard School of Dental Medicine have discovered the molecular secrets behind this herbal extract's power.
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Complex Wiring of the Nervous System May Rely On a Just a Handful of Genes and Proteins
sciencedaily.com - 2-13-12
Researchers at the Salk Institute have discovered a startling feature of early brain development that helps to explain how complex neuron wiring patterns are programmed using just a handful of critical genes. The findings, published in Cell, may help scientists develop new therapies for neurological disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and provide insight into certain cancers.
More...


Romantic Valentine's dinner good for heart
upi.com - 2-13-12
For those planning a romantic dinner for Valentine's Day, it's lucky that romantic and heart-healthy go hand-in-hand, a U.S. dietitian said.
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Skin cancer drug 'clears Alzheimer's protein from the brain'
dailymail.co.uk - 2-12-12
A skin cancer drug could prove to be a precious weapon in the fight against Alzheimer’s.
In tests, bexarotene rapidly improved brain health, memory and behaviour of mice genetically engineered to develop the disease.
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Critical Shortage of Children's Leukemia Drug
abcnews.go.com - 2-12-12
Medication used to treat the most common form of childhood leukemia is in short supply, adding to the largest nationwide shortage of critical lifesaving hospital medications in nearly a decade.
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Prozac for Puppy? More American Pets Are Prescribed Psychiatric Drugs
abcnews.go.com - 2-12-12
Psychiatric medications such as Prozac are being prescribed more often to man's best friend to help treat a variety of conditions and behaviors usually found in humans.
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You will live longer if you TELL people you're healthy, as positive thinking lengthens life
dailymail.co.uk - 2-12-12
Promoting your own wellbeing will help you live longer, say scientists.
A study found that participants who described feeling 'very well' had a lower risk of dying compared to those who reported being in a 'very poor' state.
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Plastic Surgeries Continue To Grow, Despite Sluggish Economy, USA
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-12-12
13.8 million plastic surgery procedures were performed in 2011, a 5% increase on the year before, according to a new report issued by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). The authors added that by the end of 2011, the number of total plastic surgeries had grown for 24 consecutive months. These figures include both minimally-invasive and surgical procedures.
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Heart Disease May Be A Risk Factor For Prostate Cancer
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-12-12
In a large analysis of men participating in a prostate drug trial, researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute found a significant correlation between coronary artery disease and prostate cancer, suggesting the two conditions may have shared causes.
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Physical Activity Yields Feelings Of Excitement, Enthusiasm
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-12-12
People who are more physically active report greater levels of excitement and enthusiasm than people who are less physically active, according to Penn State researchers. People also are more likely to report feelings of excitement and enthusiasm on days when they are more physically active than usual.
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Alzheimer's brain plaques 'rapidly cleared' in mice
bbc.co.uk - 2-12-12
Destructive plaques found in the brains of Alzheimer's patients have been rapidly cleared by researchers testing a cancer drug on mice.
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Stem cell tourism can be pricey and risky
upi.com - 2-12-12
Increasing numbers of Canadians are traveling to countries for stem cell treatments that are expensive and unproven, which may be risky, researchers said.
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Study Weighs Pros, Cons of Home or Hospital Birth
healthday.com - 2-12-12
Babies whose mothers choose to deliver at home are at higher risk of complications after birth, including low Apgar scores and seizures, a new study finds.
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John, Mary, Joe: Simpler Names May Help You Get Ahead
healthday.com - 2-12-12
The easier your name is to pronounce, the more likely you are to receive promotions at work and make friends, a new study suggests.
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Why the last chocolate tastes the best
telegraph.co.uk - 2-11-12
The last chocolate tastes the best because knowing something is set to end makes people enjoy it more, a study has found.
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Does Brain Go Into Standby Mode When Metabolic Energy Is Low?
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-11-12
By using a computerized model to study an electroencepholagram (EEG) brain pattern called "burst suppression", researchers in the US believe they have discovered a fundamental mechanism of how the brain behaves when the metabolic energy supply to brain cells is low. It is as if burst suppression is a type of intermittent standy mode, where a period of intense activity is followed by a period of inactivity, which endures until there is enough metabolic energy for cells to become active again.
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Facebook Use Affects Mood Differently To Stress And Relaxation
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-11-12
Researchers measured people's physical and psychological responses while they used Facebook, performed a stressful task, or just relaxed, and found each of these activities appears to have a different effect on mood and arousal. Dr. Maurizio Mauri of the Institute of Human, Language and Environmental Sciences at IULM University in Milan, Italy, and colleagues, write about their findings in the peer-reviewed journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking. A press statement on the study was released earlier this week.
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Alzheimer's brain plaques 'rapidly cleared' in mice
bbc.co.uk - 2-11-12
Destructive plaques found in the brains of Alzheimer's patients have been rapidly cleared by researchers testing a cancer drug on mice.
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Fish reduces colon polyps in women
upi.com - 2-11-12
Women who eat at least three servings of fish per week have a reduced risk of developing some types of colon polyps, U.S. researchers found.
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Buying aniline online can be deadly
upi.com - 2-11-12
If research chemicals are labeled with a "not for human consumption" alert, U.S. health officials say consumers should believe the warning.
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Study Weighs Pros, Cons of Home or Hospital Birth
healthday.com - 2-11-12
Babies whose mothers choose to deliver at home are at higher risk of complications after birth, including low Apgar scores and seizures, a new study finds.
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H1N1 'Swine' Flu Makes a Comeback in Mexico
healthday.com - 2-11-12
It was just about three years ago that a strange new strain of flu first appeared in Mexico, then spread across the border to the United States and eventually much of the globe.
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Repeat C-Section Best Scheduled at 39 Weeks, Study Says
healthday.com - 2-11-12
A new childbirth study says 39 weeks' gestation is the best time for elective Cesarean delivery for women who have previously delivered via C-section.
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Substance P Causes Seizures in Patients Infected by Pork Tapeworm
sciencedaily.com - 2-11-12
A neuropeptide called Substance P is the cause of seizures in patients with brains infected by the pork tapeworm (Taenia solium), said Baylor College of Medicine researchers in a report that appears online in the open access journal PLoS Pathogens.
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Most Lethal Known Species of Prion Protein Identified
sciencedaily.com - 2-11-12
Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have identified a single prion protein that causes neuronal death similar to that seen in “mad cow” disease, but is at least 10 times more lethal than larger prion species.
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GM crops around the world in 2011 – map
guardian.co.uk - 2-10-12
New data from the annual report by the International Service for the Acquisition of Agribiotic Applications shows where farmers are growing GM crops around the world
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Erectile dysfunction may be a cardiovascular warning
upi.com - 2-10-12
Most men do not realize that erectile dysfunction is a warning sign of potential cardiovascular disease, a U.S. expert warns.
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Canine Cancer Studies Yield Human Insights
abcnews.go.com - 2-10-12
Some of the most promising insights into cancer are coming from pet dogs thanks to emerging studies exploring remarkable biological similarities between man and his best friend.
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'Belly bottom': A graphic warning of what happens when diabetics inject insulin at the same site every day
dailymail.co.uk - 2-10-12
A 55-year-old man with type 1 diabetes shocked his doctors, after he revealed what looked like two bottom cheeks hanging below his navel.
The patient from South Africa, had been told to inject his life-saving insulin jabs into two areas of his stomach to control his blood-sugar levels.
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Fasting 'could help combat cancer and boost effectiveness of treatments'
dailymail.co.uk - 2-10-12
Going without food for short periods may help to combat cancer and boost the effectiveness of treatments, say scientists.
A study found fasting slowed the growth and spread of tumours and cured some cancers when it was combined with chemotherapy.
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US Teen Pregnancies At 40-Year Low
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-10-12
In 2008, rates of teen pregnancies in the US reached their lowest level in nearly 40 years. Since their peak in the early 1990s, they have fallen dramatically, as have rates of resulting births and abortions, according to a new report released this week from the Guttmacher Institute, a not-for-profit sexual health research group whose analysis finds that rates are down among all racial and ethnic groups, although disparities remain.
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Could stimulating the brain one day treat Alzheimer's disease?
cnn.com - 2-10-12
In a very small group of patients, sending electrical impulses to a memory-center in the brain - via tiny implanted electrodes - may have improved their memory.
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2 cases of deadly disease in Calif.
upi.com - 2-10-12
A California health official says two cases of what appears to be Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in Marin County could be coincidence.
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In Mice, Cancer Drug Shows Effect on Alzheimer's Symptoms
healthday.com - 2-10-12
The cancer drug bexarotene quickly eliminates Alzheimer's disease-associated amyloid beta from the brain and reverses memory problems in mice, a new study finds.
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Illicit Drugs Bought Off Internet May Be Poisons, Experts Warn
healthday.com - 2-10-12
ed blue after ingesting what they thought was a recreational drug that they had bought on the Internet highlights the dangers of such purchases, a new report claims.
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Memory Strengthened by Stimulating Key Site in Brain
sciencedaily.com - 2-10-12
Ever gone to the movies and forgotten where you parked the car? New UCLA research may one day help you improve your memory.
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Cancer drug reverses Alzheimer's in mice: study
france24.com - 2-10-12
A widely available cancer drug has shown remarkable success in reversing Alzheimer's disease in mice, raising hope of a breakthrough against incurable dementia in humans, US researchers said Thursday.
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With 40% of tests positive for TB, all of Longmont High will be tested
denverpost.com - 2-10-12
About 40 percent of Longmont High School students and staff tested for tuberculosis have had positive results, a Denver Public Health official said Wednesday.
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Neotame, New Neurotoxic Sweetener: FDA Says No Label Needed, Not Even in Organics
localssupportinglocals.ca - 2-10-12
A Monsanto-created chemical, Neotame is likely more toxic than Aspartame. The FDA has quietly decided that we don't have the right to know if it's adulterating our food, not even if the food is labeled USDA Organic.
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Untangling the benefits, and hype, surrounding yoga
usatoday.com - 2-9-12
William Broad, a New York Times science writer, has a lot of nice things to say about yoga. There's good reason, he says, that this mix of stretching, bending and deep breathing, with roots in ancient Indian meditation, has attracted some 20 million Americans.
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I went cold turkey on sugar
dailymail.co.uk - 2-9-12
There’s no denying it: I have a sweet tooth. In fact, I have 32 sweet teeth. Like many women, I can’t resist a red velvet cupcake and I give in with giddy delight to the temptation of a syrupy toffee nut latte on a cold day.
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Revolutionary putty could heal bone fractures in days rather than months, claim scientists
dailymail.co.uk - 2-9-12
Anyone who has broken a bone knows how long and arduous the recovery period can be.
Now scientists say they have created a revolutionary 'putty' that can put the healing process into super-drive.
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Chocolate cake for breakfast will help you LOSE weight and keep it off, claim scientists
dailymail.co.uk - 2-9-12
As a recipe for losing weight, tucking into a slice of chocolate cake at breakfast would seem an unlikely fantasy.
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Have we met? Those with face blindness can't recognize others
msnbc.msn.com - 2-9-12
Some people are better at recognizing a face. Now a study of individuals who have prosopagnosia, a disorder rendering them unable to distinguish another's mug, suggests a possible cause: a breakdown in a brain pathway used to process faces.
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Inhalable caffeine a cheap buzz, but may have risks
msnbc.msn.com - 2-9-12
Move over, coffee and Red Bull. A Harvard professor thinks the next big thing will be people inhaling their caffeine from a lipstick-sized tube. Critics say the novel product, called "AeroShot," is not without its risks.
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Proton Pump Inhibitors Raise Persistent Diarrhea Risk, Warns FDA
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-9-12
Stomach acid drugs, known as PPIs (proton pump inhibitors), are linked to a higher risk of diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile, a type of bacterium. Patients on PPIs who develop persistent diarrhea should be tested for CDAD (Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea), says the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
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Respiratory Problems Linked To Soda Intake
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-9-12
A recent study by Zumin Shi, Discipline of Medicine at the University of Adelaide and team, published in Respirology, suggests soda intake can raise the risk of respiratory problems, including Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder (COPD).
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Gene therapy 'gave me sight back'
bbc.co.uk - 2-9-12
Three US citizens who lost their sight in childhood have reported a dramatic improvement in vision after having gene therapy in both eyes.
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Survey: 75% of wives say sex is important
upi.com - 2-9-12
Seventy-five percent of U.S. married women under 50 said a good sex life with their spouse is very important or extremely important to them, a survey indicated.
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Tai Chi May Help Parkinson's Patients
healthday.com - 2-9-12
Practicing the ancient art of Tai Chi twice a week helped Parkinson's patients improve their balance and walking ability, a new study shows.
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Electrical Brain Stimulation May Strengthen Memory, Study Says
healthday.com - 2-9-12
Deep brain stimulation, a technique used to treat Parkinson's disease and certain psychiatric disorders, appears to provide some memory-enhancing benefits, researchers report.
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Experts Warn of Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea
healthday.com - 2-9-12
Antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea is an increasingly worrisome reality, and steps need to be taken to limit the risk that an untreatable strain of the sexually transmitted disease will spread, U.S. researchers warn.
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Screening Moms-to-Be for Thyroid Trouble May Not Help Offspring
healthday.com - 2-9-12
Screening and treating expectant moms for thyroid problems at the end of the first trimester doesn't improve children's IQs at age 3, a new study finds.
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Heart Disease Risk Gene May Pass From Dads to Sons
healthday.com - 2-9-12
An increased risk for coronary artery disease can be passed genetically from father to son on the male Y chromosome, a new study says.
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Scandal of Britain's lazy parents: How children are starting school in nappies and some can't even put on their coats
dailymail.co.uk - 2-9-12
Rising numbers of children are still in nappies when they start primary school. Staff say they are increasingly forced to disrupt classes to change pupils or clear up ‘accidents’ because parents believe toilet training is a school’s job.
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Human morality begins early in infants
upi.com - 2-8-12
A U.S. professor of psychology says research shows human morality begins in infancy. Karen Wynn, a professor of psychology at Yale University, said at a Yale lecture "The Search for the Origins of Human Good and Evil," that how infants and toddlers perceive the world can help adults understand their own reactions to events around them.
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Doctors differ on diagnosis in Tourette's-like cases
usatoday.com - 2-8-12
A doctor working to determine what is causing more than a dozen teenage girls to experience uncontrollable tics said all the girls that he has seen have tested positive for two types of infections.
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Your wish is my 100 commands: Talented dog makes the bed, fetches the milk and even gets money out of cash machine for disabled owner
dailymail.co.uk - 2-8-12
As dog owners know, you are lucky if your pooch can be persuaded to collect your slippers without chewing them to pieces.
But golden labrador Byron performs dozens of such tasks faultlessly for his owner every day.
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Vaccine to beat heroin addiction 'is just five years away'
dailymail.co.uk - 2-8-12
A vaccine against heroin addiction could be ready for human use in just five years.
Mexico's Health Secretary Salomon Chertorivski said the Government had patented the treatment after successfully testing it on addicted rats.
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Coffee could improve memory
telegraph.co.uk - 2-8-12
Researchers said the drink could improve the memory of people suffering from diseases of the brain or age-related forgetfulness, and may even prevent symptoms from appearing in the first place.
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Amateur tattoos carry hepatitis C risk
msnbc.msn.com - 2-8-12
If you're planning on getting a tattoo, make sure it's from a professional and not your friend, says a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
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CDC: 9 out of 10 Americans eat too much salt
msnbc.msn.com - 2-8-12
Despite public health messages telling Americans to lower the amount of salt in their diets, most of us still eat too much of the stuff, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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Obesity Epidemic Linked To Brain Mechanisms
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-8-12
America's rising rates of obesity in virtually all age groups is partly due to biological factors, researchers from the Cincinnati Diabetes and Obesity Center reported in the journal Cell Metabolism. Approximately one third of all American adults are obese today, and the percentage continues to rise, says the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention).
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Spanking Undermines A Child's Long-Term Development
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-8-12
Spanking children may harm their long-term development, making them more aggressive towards their peers, siblings, parents, as well as spouses later in life, researchers from the University of Manitoba and Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, report in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). Their study tracked children for two decades.
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Magnetic therapy for depression promising
upi.com - 2-8-12
Psychotherapy and antidepressants treat only about one-third of patients who suffer depression, but a magnetic therapy is promising, a U.S. researcher said.
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Risk of Death From Certain Breast Cancers May Rise With Age
healthday.com - 2-8-12
The risk of dying from a hormone receptor-positive breast cancer increases with age, according to new research. And one reason might be that older women with breast cancer are undertreated compared to their younger peers.
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Heart Failure, Osteoporosis Go 'Hand-in-Hand': Researchers
healthday.com - 2-8-12
Heart failure is linked to thinning of the bones and an increased risk of fractures, a new study indicates.
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2011 Shark Attacks Remain Steady, Deaths Highest Since 1993
sciencedaily.com - 2-8-12
Shark attacks in the U.S. declined in 2011, but worldwide fatalities reached a two-decade high, according to the University of Florida's International Shark Attack File report.
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Ovarian Cancer Risk Related to Inherited Inflammation Genes
sciencedaily.com - 2-8-12
In a study conducted by researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center and colleagues from 11 other institutions in the Unites States and the United Kingdom, genes that are known to be involved in inflammation were found to be related to risk of ovarian cancer.
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Vitamin D Deficiency High Among Trauma Patients
sciencedaily.com - 2-8-12
New research presented at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) found that 77 percent of trauma patients had deficient or insufficient levels of vitamin D.
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Mortality rate after age 80 underestimated
upi.com - 2-7-12
Due to an error in computation, the odds of living to a ripe old age in the United States are lower than previously thought, researchers said.
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New Alzheimer's criteria would change diagnosis for millions
msnbc.msn.com - 2-7-12
Almost everyone currently diagnosed with a mild form of Alzheimer's disease would be downgraded to not having the condition, if new proposed criteria for the diagnosis of cognitive problems were applied, a new study shows.
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Facebook takes a toll on your mental health
msnbc.msn.com - 2-7-12
Facebook's initial public offering of stock is likely to make a lot of developers and designers of the site very wealthy. But for many users, frequent Facebooking may not be so beneficial.
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Bad Immunity Genes - Why do They Survive?
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-7-12
New evidence has been discovered by biologists at the University of Utah as to why people, mice and other vertebrate animals carry thousands of different genes to create major histocompatibility complex (MHCs) proteins, despite the fact that some of those genes make humans vulnerable to autoimmune diseases and infections. Findings from the study will be published online the week of February 6, 2012, in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Green Tea Protects Against Functional Disability Linked To Aging
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-7-12
Regular green tea drinkers have a lower risk of developing functional disability, researchers from Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan, reported in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Functional disability refers to problems with daily chores and activities, such as bathing or dressing.
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Psychologists highlight pitfalls of online dating
cnn.com - 2-7-12
Thanks to the proliferation of online dating, would-be couples are now almost as likely to meet via email or a virtual "wink" as they are through friends and family.
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Diabetes quadruples birth defects risk, say researchers
bbc.co.uk - 2-7-12
The risk of birth defects increases four-fold if the pregnant mother has diabetes, researchers say.
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Pancreas May 'Taste' Fructose, Hinting at Links to Diabetes
healthday.com - 2-7-12
New research shows that the pancreas has sweet-taste receptors -- like those found on the tongue -- that can "taste" fructose.
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Metformin Preferred Drug for Type 2 Diabetes, Experts Say
healthday.com - 2-7-12
When it comes to the treatment of type 2 diabetes, the first line of defense is lifestyle changes such as losing weight and exercising more often.
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Many U.S. Kids Still Buy Unhealthy Snacks at School
healthday.com - 2-7-12
Despite efforts to serve healthier meals to school children, roughly half of U.S. elementary school kids can buy junk food at school, a new study finds.
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Smoking May Be Especially Tough on Men's Brains
healthday.com - 2-7-12
Smoking appears to speed declines in memory, thinking, learning and processing information in men, but not in women, new research suggests.
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Playing in the sun ‘reduces risk of eczema and food allergies in children’
dailymail.co.uk - 2-7-12
Playing in the sunshine reduces the risk of children developing eczema and food allergies, researchers claim.
Those living in areas with lower levels of sunlight are at greater risk of developing food allergies and the skin condition, compared to those in areas with higher UV.
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Mothers-to-be with diabetes ‘four times more likely to have baby with birth defects’
dailymail.co.uk - 2-7-12
Pregnant women with diabetes are almost four times more likely to have a baby with a birth defect than women without the condition, warn researchers.
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Worldwide malaria deaths on downward trend
upi.com - 2-6-12
Deaths from malaria have been on a downward trend for the past several years, U.S. researchers say.
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Proposed ballot measure in California would put state in charge of medical marijuana
sacbee.com - 2-6-12
A proposed ballot initiative in November begs a key question looming over California's medical marijuana industry: Can stricter state regulation keep the federal government from shutting it down?
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Mental Illness Suspect Genes Found To Be Among The Most Environmentally Responsive By NIH Study
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-6-12
For the first time, scientists have tracked the activity, across the lifespan, of an environmentally responsive regulatory mechanism that turns genes on and off in the brain's executive hub. Among key findings of the study by National Institutes of Health scientists: genes implicated in schizophrenia and autism turn out to be members of a select club of genes in which regulatory activity peaks during an environmentally-sensitive critical period in development. The mechanism, called DNA methylation, abruptly switches from off to on within the human brain's prefrontal cortex during this pivotal transition from fetal to postnatal life. As methylation increases, gene expression slows down after birth.
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Distinguishing Between The Forgetful And Those At Risk Of Alzheimer's Disease
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-6-12
It can be difficult to distinguish between people with normal age-associated memory loss and those with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). However people with aMCI are at a greater risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), and identification of these people would mean that they could begin treatment as early as possible. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Geriatrics shows that specific questions, included as part of a questionnaire designed to help diagnose AD, are also able to discriminate between normal memory loss and aMCI.
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N.Y. town still baffled by teens' mysterious tics
cnn.com - 2-6-12
In the tiny New York town of LeRoy, one thing is for sure; since October, 16 people suddenly have developed uncontrollable twitching and verbal tics.
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Safe Social Networking Tips for Teens
healthday.com - 2-6-12
More than 60 percent of American teens have at least one profile on a social networking site, and many spend more than two hours a day on social networking sites, according to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
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Dealing With Head Lice
healthday.com - 2-6-12
Although there is a stigma associated with having head lice, infestations with these small insects are common and nothing to be ashamed of, according to Dr. Hannah Chow-Johnson, a pediatrician at Loyola University Health System.
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Placebos and Distraction: New Study Shows How to Boost the Power of Pain Relief, Without Drugs
sciencedaily.com - 2-5-12
Placebos reduce pain by creating an expectation of relief. Distraction -- say, doing a puzzle -- relieves it by keeping the brain busy. But do they use the same brain processes? Neuromaging suggests they do. When applying a placebo, scientists see activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. That's the part of the brain that controls high-level cognitive functions like working memory and attention -- which is what you use to do that distracting puzzle.
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Diabetes Takes Toll on Women's Hearing: Study
healthday.com - 2-5-12
Diabetes is associated with hearing loss in women, especially if the blood sugar disease isn't well-controlled, new research indicates.
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Recall: Hard-cooked eggs sold in 34 states
upi.com - 2-5-12
Michael Foods says it's recalling buckets of hard-cooked eggs in brine sold for institutional use from its Wakefield, Neb., facility due to potential Listeria.
The Minneapolis Star Tribune reported 150,000 pounds of eggs were involved in the recall and KTLA-TV, Los Angeles, said that amounted to 1 million eggs.
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It sounds like something from a horror film: an illness that causes an itchy, crawling sensation all over the body, tiny coloured fibres that ooze out of the skin, and painful sores.
dailymail.co.uk - 2-5-12
Cancer is set to rocket in the UK with new cases rising 30 per cent by 2030, experts warned today.
The UK ranks 16th out of 27 countries in the European Union for the predicted rise in cases, according to the data published by the World Cancer Research Fund.
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'I am not mad, Morgellons IS real': Thousands claim to suffer from the agonising skin condition but doctors say it is psychological
dailymail.co.uk - 2-5-12
It sounds like something from a horror film: an illness that causes an itchy, crawling sensation all over the body, tiny coloured fibres that ooze out of the skin, and painful sores.
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Still crazy: Some dabble in hard drugs after 50, researchers find
msnbc.msn.com - 2-5-12
The specter of a burned-out Baby Boomer using hard drugs way into middle age may conjure images of addiction, destruction and death.
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Memory Function - Decaffeinated Coffee May Help
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-5-12
Drinking decaffeinated coffee may improve brain energy metabolism associated with diabetes type 2, according to a study published in Nutritional Neuroscience and carried out by researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Brain energy metabolism is a dysfunction with a known risk factor for dementia and other neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease.
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Genetic Connection To Traumatic Experience
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-5-12
Rutgers scientists have uncovered genetic clues as to why some mice no longer in danger are still fearful while others are resilient to traumatic experiences - knowledge that could help those suffering with crippling anxiety and PTSD.
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Does A Lab-Measured Compassionate Brain Fare Well In Real Life?
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-5-12
A new series of studies is being launched by the University of Wisconsin-Madison, exploring insight knowledge on how laboratory measures of moral qualities, such as compassion, relate to real-life behavior.
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The 'forbidden fruit' of medicinal mushrooms
cnn.com - 2-5-12
Paul Stamets was shy as a child; he couldn't look people in the eyes, so he stared at the ground. And that, he says, is where he found mushrooms.
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Exclusive: Doctor cheating warnings expand to dermatology
cnn.com - 2-5-12
Doctors studying to become dermatologists have, for years, shared exam questions by memorizing and writing them down after the test to become board certified, CNN has confirmed.
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A Lonely Heart Can Make You Sick: Middle Aged Divorced Women Vulnerable to Contracting HIV
sciencedaily.com - 2-5-12
Newly divorced middle aged women are more vulnerable to contract HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases, according to Christopher Coleman, PhD, MPH, RN, associate professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, because they tend to let their guard down with new sexual partners and avoid using protection since they are unafraid of getting pregnant.
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STDs in baby boomers increasing
upi.com - 2-5-12
U.S., Canadian and British baby boomers are not practicing safe sex and as a result are at risk for sexually transmitted diseases, researchers say.
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Multiple anesthesias linked to ADHD
upi.com - 2-5-12
Multiple exposures to anesthesia at a young age are associated with higher rates of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, U.S. researchers found.
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Map pinpoints areas of Lyme disease
upi.com - 2-5-12
A tick survey shows a risk of Lyme disease in the Northeast from Maine to Virginia, but most of the South free of Lyme disease-carrying ticks, researchers say.
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Anemia triples risk of death after stroke
upi.com - 2-5-12
Being anemic could triple the risk of dying within a year after having a stroke, said researchers at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn.
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Environment affects mental illness genes
upi.com - 2-4-12
Genes linked to schizophrenia and autism are members of a select club of genes regulated during environmentally sensitive times, U.S. researchers said.
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Multiple anesthesias linked to ADHD
upi.com - 2-4-12
Multiple exposures to anesthesia at a young age are associated with higher rates of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, U.S. researchers found.
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Is social media spreading twitching hysteria?
msnbc.msn.com - 2-4-12
Doctors treating the strange case of nearly 20 teenagers with a twitching disorder in upstate New York say the symptoms may be spreading faster through the girls' own use of Facebook and other forms of social media.
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New Procedure Repairs Severed Nerves in Minutes, Restoring Limb Use in Days or Weeks
sciencedaily.com - 2-4-12
American scientists believe a new procedure to repair severed nerves could result in patients recovering in days or weeks, rather than months or years. The team used a cellular mechanism similar to that used by many invertebrates to repair damage to nerve axons.
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Obesity may be infectious, study finds
msnbc.msn.com - 2-4-12
We've heard obesity can be "spread" between friends when we copy each other's eating habits, but a new study in mice suggests obesity could actually be infectious.
That's right, infectious. As in, something you can catch.
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Take the Alzheimer's test: The 21 questions that can reveal if YOU are at risk...
dailymail.co.uk - 2-4-12
A quick test that tells if your loved one is at risk of Alzheimer’s disease has been devised by doctors.
The 21-question test distinguishes between normal absent-mindedness and the more sinister memory lapses that may signal the early stages of dementia.
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Children exposed to anaesthetic early in life 'have double risk of ADHD'
dailymail.co.uk - 2-4-12
Toddlers exposed to anaesthesia are more likely to develop attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a study has found.
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Sugar Should Be Regulated Like Alcohol And Tobacco Say Scientists
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-4-12
Scientists at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), argue that added sweeteners pose dangers to public health, and the government should regulate sugar in the same way as it regulates alcohol and tobacco. They set out their reasons for viewing sugar as "toxic" in a comment article published in Nature this week.
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Facebook doesn't help low self-esteem
upi.com - 2-4-12
People with low self-esteem tend to bombard friends on Facebook with negative news of their lives -- making themselves less likable, Canadian researchers say.
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Diabetes helped by any exercise
upi.com - 2-4-12
Intermittent exercise with and without low oxygen concentrations can improve insulin sensitivity in those with type 2 diabetes, British researchers found.
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Diabetes Takes Toll on Women's Hearing: Study
healthday.com - 2-4-12
Diabetes is associated with hearing loss in women, especially if the blood sugar disease isn't well-controlled, new research indicates.
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Why Human Brains Are Smarter Than Chimp Brains
healthday.com - 2-4-12
Extended synaptic development may explain why humans are intellectually superior to primates, a new study suggests.
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Asthmatic Moms Who Breast-feed May Help Their Children's Lungs
healthday.com - 2-4-12
Breast-feeding is associated with improved lung function in school-age children, particularly those with asthmatic mothers, a new study says.
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Aspirin, Warfarin Fare Equally for Heart Failure Patients
healthday.com - 2-4-12
A major head-to-head trial finds that aspirin is equally as good as warfarin in preventing stroke and death in heart failure patients.
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A Lonely Heart Can Make You Sick: Middle Aged Divorced Women Vulnerable to Contracting HIV
sciencedaily.com - 2-4-12
Newly divorced middle aged women are more vulnerable to contract HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases, according to Christopher Coleman, PhD, MPH, RN, associate professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, because they tend to let their guard down with new sexual partners and avoid using protection since they are unafraid of getting pregnant.
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Regular Use of Vitamin and Mineral Supplements Could Reduce the Risk of Colon Cancer, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 2-4-12
Could the use of vitamin and mineral supplements in a regular diet help to reduce the risk of colon cancer and protect against carcinogens? A study published in the Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology (CJPP) found that rats given regular multivitamin and mineral supplements showed a significantly lower risk of developing colon cancer when they were exposed to carcinogens.
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Eight-year-old survives rabies
upi.com - 2-3-12
U.S. health officials said Thursday an 8-year-old girl was hospitalized, ultimately diagnosed with rabies and survived, even though rabies is usually fatal.
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New European pill works against uterine fibroids
usatoday.com - 2-3-12
New research offers hope for the first pill to treat a common problem in young women: fibroids in the uterus. The growths can cause pain, heavy bleeding and fertility problems, and they are the leading cause of hysterectomies.
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New debate: When is medical marijuana "usable?"
usatoday.com - 2-3-12
When police knocked on Josh Brewer's door to check for marijuana, even one of the nation's most liberal medical marijuana laws was put to the test.
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Deadly rabies fear after man shows off bat in box
msnbc.msn.com - 2-3-12
Health officials are warning people who were in downtown Providence, Rhode Island, last week that they may have been exposed to rabies when a man was showing off a bat he had in a box.
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Omega-3 fatty acids tied to lower heart arrhythmia risk
msnbc.msn.com - 2-3-12
Older adults who had the highest blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids, most commonly found in fish, were 30 percent less likely to later develop an irregular heartbeat than peers with the lowest blood levels of omega-3s, according to a U.S. study.
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Aspirin Is Underused By Stroke Survivors
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-3-12
Roughly 40% of patients who survive a stroke do not take aspirin on a daily basis, despite established guidelines that recommend its use for secondary prevention in this population, investigators announced at the 2012 International Stroke Conference.
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Anesthesia Exposure Linked To ADHD In Children
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-3-12
A study by researchers at Mayo Clinic, Rochester Minn., and published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, reveals that children who have been under anesthesia many times when they are young have a greater risk of developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). According to David Warner, M.D, a Mayo Clinic pediatric anesthesiologist, and researchers of this study, kids who have been exposed to anesthesia more than twice before the age of 3 are twice as likely to have ADHD than children who have not been exposed.
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Sugar tax needed, say US experts
bbc.co.uk - 2-3-12
Sugar is as damaging and addictive as alcohol or tobacco and should be regulated, claim US health experts.
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Brains may be wired for addiction
bbc.co.uk - 2-3-12
Abnormalities in the brain may make some people more likely to become drug addicts, according to scientists at the University of Cambridge.
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U.S. child abuse, neglect cost -- $124B
upi.com - 2-3-12
U.S. child abuse -- including physical, sexual, psychological and neglect -- costs $124 billion a year, federal health officials estimated.
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Walnuts top list for antioxidant value
upi.com - 2-3-12
Walnuts ranked best for having more antioxidants -- polyphenols -- and a higher antioxidant potency in an analysis of nuts, U.S. researchers found.
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It's 'Buyer Beware' When Getting Statins Off the Internet
healthday.com - 2-3-12
Be wary of buying the cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins on the Internet, British researchers say.
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Married Men Seek Help for Stroke Sooner Than Their Wives
healthday.com - 2-3-12
Married men with stroke symptoms are quicker to call for emergency help than married women, a new study finds.
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Stroke Can Impact a Child's Language, Hand-Eye Coordination
healthday.com - 2-3-12
Lower IQs and problems with visual-motor and language skills are common among children who survive an arterial ischemic stroke, according to a new study.
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Mouse Study Suggests Alzheimer's Spreads Through Brain Like an Infection
healthday.com - 2-3-12
Alzheimer's disease appears to spread through the brain, traveling from neuron to neuron in much the same way that an infection or cancer moves through the body, new research with mice suggests.
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Here Is What Real Commitment to Your Marriage Means
sciencedaily.com - 2-3-12
What does being committed to your marriage really mean? UCLA psychologists answer this question in a new study based on their analysis of 172 married couples over the first 11 years of marriage.
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Untangling the Mysteries of Alzheimer's
sciencedaily.com - 2-3-12
One of the most distinctive signs of the development of Alzheimer's disease is a change in the behavior of a protein that neuroscientists call tau. In normal brains, tau is present in individual units essential to neuron health. In the cells of Alzheimer's brains, by contrast, tau proteins aggregate into twisted structures known as "neurofibrillary tangles." These tangles are considered a hallmark of the disease, but their precise role in Alzheimer's pathology has long been a point of contention among researchers.
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Coffee Consumption Reduces Fibrosis Risk in Those With Fatty Liver Disease, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 2-3-12
Caffeine consumption has long been associated with decreased risk of liver disease and reduced fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. Now, newly published research confirms that coffee caffeine consumption reduces the risk of advanced fibrosis in those with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Findings published in the February issue of Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, show that increased coffee intake, specifically among patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), decreases risk of hepatic fibrosis.
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Feline Herpes Outbreak Infects 30 Cats At Virginia Animal Shelter
washington.cbslocal.com - 2-3-12
A feline herpes outbreak has affected 30 cats at the Isle of Wight County Animal Shelter.
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Taco Bell Linked To Salmonella Probe after 68 People Fall Ill in 10 States, Report Says
myfoxdc.com - 2-3-12
Yum Brands Inc.'s Taco Bell chain was investigated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for involvement in a salmonella outbreak that sickened 68 people in 10 states, Food Safety News reported Wednesday.
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Flesh-eating bug spread by sneezes and coughs
metro.co.uk - 2-3-12
Coughing and sneezing on crowded trains and buses can spread deadly flesh-eating superbugs, commuters are being warned.
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Valentine's Day may be worst day to kiss
upi.com - 2-2-12
Valentine's Day falls smack dab in the middle of flu and cold season, so kissing may not be such a good idea, a U.S. infectious disease expert suggests.
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Diet soda linked to stroke, heart attack
upi.com - 2-2-12
Drinking diet soft drinks on a daily basis might increase the risk stroke, heart attack and vascular death, U.S. researchers said.
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Blood test detects depressed patients
upi.com - 2-2-12
A blood test analyzing levels of nine biomarkers accurately distinguished patients diagnosed with depression from others, U.S. researchers said.
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Purple potatoes may lower blood pressure
upi.com - 2-2-12
Two small helpings of purple potatoes a day decreases blood pressure by about 4 percent without causing weight gain, U.S. researchers said.
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Pfizer recalls 1M birth control packs after mixup
usatoday.com - 2-2-12
Pfizer Inc. is recalling 1 million packets of birth control pills because of a packaging error that could leave women with an inadequate dose of the hormone-based drugs and raise the risk that they will get pregnant accidentally.
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Child Abuse Costs US a Staggering $124 Billion
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 2-2-12
The child abuse that takes place in one year in the United States will cost the nation $124 billion over the victims' lifetimes, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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Heartburn pills taken by thousands of women 'raise risk of hip fractures by up to 50 per cent'
dailymail.co.uk - 2-2-12
Hundreds of thousands of women who take commonly prescribed heartburn pills could be up to 50 per cent more prone to hip fractures, scientists warn.
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Facebook and Twitter 'more addictive than tobacco and alcohol'
telegraph.co.uk - 2-2-12
Resisting the urge to check social networking sites for updates is more difficult than turning down a drink, according to a study of people's everyday desires.
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Bite for bite, women diners copy each other
today.msnbc.msn.com - 2-2-12
Women who dine together tend to eat at the same pace, according to a new study. The researchers say they now want to find out whether the same applies to men.
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Massages Scientifically Proven To Help Reduce Pain
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-2-12
According to a study published online in Science Translational Medicine by researchers from the Buck Institute for Research on Aging and McMaster University in Hamilton Ontario, massages aid the growth of new mitochondria in skeletal muscle, and help to reduce inflammation. Many athletes would attest to the fact that massages help in treating pain, and speed up recovery, but now scientists have the evidence to go along with their testimonies.
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FDA Approves Drug For Common Skin Cancer
medicalnewstoday.com - 2-2-12
On Monday, the US Food and Drug Administration approved a new type of drug to treat adult patients with advanced basal-cell carcinoma, the most common type of skin cancer.
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Lower sunlight exposure may increase stroke risk
cnn.com - 2-2-12
People who live in areas with the least amount of sunlight may have a greater risk for stroke, according to findings presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference in New Orleans this week.
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Ulcer drugs 'link to fractures'
bbc.co.uk - 2-2-12
Women who take certain ulcer drugs have a small increased risk of hip fractures in later life, particularly if they smoke, US research suggests.
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Science Shows How Massage Eases Sore Muscles
healthday.com - 2-2-12
Having a massage after strenuous exercise not only feels good, it reduces inflammation in muscles at the cellular level, researchers have found.
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Worrying Too Much Might Raise Your Risk for Stroke
healthday.com - 2-2-12
High levels of a personality trait called harm avoidance -- which includes excessive worrying, pessimism, fear and fatigue -- is associated with a higher stroke risk, a new study indicates.
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Aneurysm outcomes stagnant for last decade
upi.com - 2-2-12
Despite advances in the diagnosis and treatment of unruptured brain aneurysms, outcomes have remained stagnant over the last 10 years, U.S. researchers said.
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You might call it a marijuana mega mansion.
Police raided a five-floor commercial building in the Bronx Tuesday afternoon that was filled with marijuana plants from wall to wall.
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Cancer 'slowed by cooked tomatoes'
telegraph.co.uk - 2-1-12
A nutrient in cooked tomatoes has been shown in laboratory studies to slow the growth of - and even kill - prostate cancer cells, scientists said today.
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Words from brain waves may let scientists read your mind
msnbc.msn.com - 2-1-12
Scientists have found a way to decipher actual words from a person’s brain waves, a feat that sounds very much like mind-reading, a new study shows.
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Who's behind that outbreak? Sometimes, CDC won't say
msnbc.msn.com - 2-1-12
When government health officials wrapped up a three-month investigation of a salmonella Enteritidis outbreak that sickened 68 people in 10 states, the final report on Jan. 19 included nearly every detail -- except the name of the place that sold the food.
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Alternative to Colonoscopy Spots Cancers, Too
healthday.com - 2-1-12
Physicians can boost their chances of finding signs of colorectal cancer in patients with a second flexible sigmoidoscopy test, which is a less invasive procedure than a colonoscopy, a new study shows.
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For Kids, Laughter Really May Be the Best Medicine
healthday.com - 2-1-12
Specific areas of children's brains that are activated by humor have been identified by researchers in a first-of-a-kind study.
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Surprise Finding Redraws 'Map' of Blood Cell Production
sciencedaily.com - 2-1-12
A study of the cells that respond to crises in the blood system has yielded a few surprises, redrawing the 'map' of how blood cells are made in the body.
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Exercise fights chronic disease sadness
upi.com - 2-1-12
Feelings of sadness that often accompany chronic illness can improve after exercise, researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham said.
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Men and woman lie about height, weight
upi.com - 2-1-12
When asked in surveys to self-report height and weight, U.S. men and women lie -- they underestimate weight and overestimate height, researchers found.
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Music training may help deter hearing loss
upi.com - 2-1-12
The brain can be trained to overcome, in part, some age-related hearing loss in those with musical training, U.S. researchers suggest.
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