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February, 2011 - Herbal and Health News

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Pecans nuts are a pick-me-up for the heart and lower risk of cancer
dailymail.co.uk - 2-28-11
Eating pecan nuts can lower the risk of developing heart disease or cancer, say researchers.
A study showed their naturally occurring antioxidants help reduce inflammation in the arteries.
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Children given sweets when they are good are the most likely to end up fat and unhappy
telegraph.co.uk - 2-28-11
Children whose parents given them food to reward good behaviour are more likely to become obese adults, a study has found.
A poll of more than 2,000 people has found those given edible treats in childhood for behaving well had a higher chance of becoming heavily overweight, or of developing an eating disorder, than those who were not.
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Scientists discover cause of rare skin cancer that heals itself
telegraph.co.uk - 2-28-11
Discovering how a rare cancer heals itself could lead to new treatments for other types of the disease, claim scientists.
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Shoppers wary of GM foods find they're everywhere
usatoday.com - 2-28-11
You may not want to eat genetically engineered foods. Chances are, you are eating them anyway.
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Coffee, sex, smog can all trigger heart attack, study finds
usatoday.com - 2-28-11
A major analysis of data on potential triggers for heart attacks finds that many of the substances and activities Americans indulge in every day - coffee, alcohol, sex, even breathing - can all help spur an attack.
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Your Medicine Cabinet May Be Your Pet's Worst Enemy
healthday.com - 2-28-11
Giving medications meant for humans to pets can be dangerous, a veterinarian warns.
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Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
healthday.com - 2-28-11
A new study says it takes far more vitamin D than initially thought to dramatically cut the risk of several major diseases, including breast cancer.
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Low vitamin D linked to allergies in children
sciencedaily.com/releases - 2-27-11
A new paper published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology has found a link between low vitamin D levels and the onset of allergies in children. The study of over 3,000 children concluded that among children with low or deficient levels of vitamin D, sensitivity to allergens was present in more than half of those for which they tested.
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Conventional agriculture using up global supply of phosphorus, causing widespread pollution
sciencedaily.com/releases - 2-27-11
Modern agriculture is heavily reliant on the use of phosphorus, a mineral necessary for proper plant and crop growth. But conventional growing methods have all but depleted this natural mineral from certain areas of farmland, which has resulted in the widespread mining of phosphorus to replace it. This mining and its subsequent overuse in agriculture has led not only to widespread pollution of water supplies, but it also threatens to use up the world's limited supply of phosphorus within the next several decades, say some.
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Happy Children Make Happy Adults
sciencedaily.com/releases - 2-27-11
Being a 'happy' teenager is linked to increased well-being in adulthood, new research finds.
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Transgenic Fungi May Be Able to Combat Malaria and Other Bug-Borne Diseases
sciencedaily.com/releases - 2-27-11
New findings by a University of Maryland-led team of scientists indicate that a genetically engineered fungus carrying genes for a human anti-malarial antibody or a scorpion anti-malarial toxin could be a highly effective, specific and environmentally friendly tool for combating malaria, at a time when the effectiveness of current pesticides against malaria mosquitoes is declining.
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Brain-Imaging in Depressed Moms Shows Blunted Response to Crying Infant
healthday.com - 2-27-11
Armed with brain scans, researchers have discovered bawling babies trigger a far more muted response in the brains of depressed mothers than in mothers who aren't depressed.
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Low vitamin D linked to allergies in children
sciencedaily.com/releases - 2-27-11
A new paper published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology has found a link between low vitamin D levels and the onset of allergies in children. The study of over 3,000 children concluded that among children with low or deficient levels of vitamin D, sensitivity to allergens was present in more than half of those for which they tested.
More...


Conventional agriculture using up global supply of phosphorus, causing widespread pollution
sciencedaily.com/releases - 2-27-11
Modern agriculture is heavily reliant on the use of phosphorus, a mineral necessary for proper plant and crop growth. But conventional growing methods have all but depleted this natural mineral from certain areas of farmland, which has resulted in the widespread mining of phosphorus to replace it. This mining and its subsequent overuse in agriculture has led not only to widespread pollution of water supplies, but it also threatens to use up the world's limited supply of phosphorus within the next several decades, say some.
More...


Happy Children Make Happy Adults
sciencedaily.com/releases - 2-27-11
Being a 'happy' teenager is linked to increased well-being in adulthood, new research finds.
More...


Transgenic Fungi May Be Able to Combat Malaria and Other Bug-Borne Diseases
sciencedaily.com/releases - 2-27-11
New findings by a University of Maryland-led team of scientists indicate that a genetically engineered fungus carrying genes for a human anti-malarial antibody or a scorpion anti-malarial toxin could be a highly effective, specific and environmentally friendly tool for combating malaria, at a time when the effectiveness of current pesticides against malaria mosquitoes is declining.
More...


Brain-Imaging in Depressed Moms Shows Blunted Response to Crying Infant
healthday.com - 2-27-11
Armed with brain scans, researchers have discovered bawling babies trigger a far more muted response in the brains of depressed mothers than in mothers who aren't depressed.
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Half of Alzheimer's Cases Misdiagnosed
health.com - 2-26-11
Roughly half of the people who are told they have Alzheimer's disease may in fact have other forms of dementia that produce similar symptoms, according to a new study.
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Symptoms of meningitis
telegraph.co.uk - 2-26-11
The early stages of both meningitis and meningococcal septecaemia can be very hard to spot. Worried parents or carers should go immediately to the nearest GP surgery or casualty unit if they are concerned, according to Meningitis UK.
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Study: Combining broccoli with broccoli sprouts doubles anti-cancer effect
naturalnews.com - 2-26-11
Study after study continues to show that eating broccoli helps to prevent and treat cancer. And a new study out of the University of Illinois (U of I) says that combining broccoli with broccoli sprouts nearly doubles the cruciferous vegetable's anti-cancer effects.
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Alzheimer's breakthrough: scientists discover omega-3s override the bad gene causing Alzheimer's
naturalnews.com - 2-26-11
Scientists tend to describe their research and findings with facts and figures only, leaving out any emotion. But Prof. Daniel Michaelson of Tel Aviv University's Department of Neurobiology has uncovered something so potentially groundbreaking he called it "exhilarating" in a statement to the press.
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Study: Colostrum helps treat leaky gut syndrome
naturalnews.com - 2-26-11
Heavy-training athletes, and runners in particular, often suffer from "leaky gut syndrome," a condition in which bowel health becomes damaged due to increased permeability of gut lining. But a new study published in the American Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology has found a viable solution -- bovine colostrum.
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Several states consider loosening raw milk restrictions as FDA tries to tighten them
naturalnews.com - 2-26-11
As the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) evaluates ways to further restrict Americans' access to raw milk and raw milk products, several US states are considering legislation to loosen the regulatory noose that limits freedom of food choice. Texas, Oregon, Minnesota, New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Wisconsin all have pending legislation to legalize raw milk sales, relax sale restrictions that make buying the product difficult, or for the first time decriminalize raw milk sales with restrictions.
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Chemical Compounds in Trees Can Fight Deadly Staph Infections in Humans
sciencedaily.com - 2-26-11
Most people would never suspect that a "trash tree," one with little economic value and often removed by farmers due to its ability to destroy farmland, could be the key to fighting a deadly bacterium. Now, a University of Missouri researcher has found an antibiotic in the Eastern Red Cedar tree that is effective against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a "superbug" that is resistant to most medications.
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Newborn Heart Muscle Can Grow Back by Itself, Study Shows
sciencedaily.com - 2-26-11
In a promising science-fiction-meets-real-world juxtaposition, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have discovered that the mammalian newborn heart can heal itself completely.
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Endurance Exercise Thwarts Premature Aging in Mice
healthday.com - 2-26-11
Endurance exercise may be "the fountain of youth" -- or so a new study of mice suggests.
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Family Dog Might Make Teens More Active
healthday.com - 2-26-11
Teenagers who live in homes with dogs get a bit more daily exercise than teens without pooches, new research finds.
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Osteoporosis Drugs Linked to Fractures
everydayhealth.com - 2-25-11
Long-term treatment with bisphosphonates for osteoporosis hikes the chances of atypical thigh bone (femur) fractures nearly threefold, researchers said, but the absolute risk remains very small.
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Warning: Air Pollution May Be Hazardous to Hearts
everydayhealth.com - 2-25-11
Air pollution is high up on the list of potential triggers of heart attacks.
Cleaning the air we breathe by reducing levels of particulate matter by 30 µg/m3 would potentially prevent or delay about 5 percent of nonfatal heart attacks, Dr. Tim Nawrot, of Hasselt University in Diepenbeek, Belgium, and colleagues reported online in The Lancet.
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Stress 'does not stop IVF working'
telegraph.co.uk - 2-25-11
Academics say infertile couples can be "reassured" that no matter how emotionally affected they are by having IVF, it does not lessen their chances of having a baby.
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Study sees benefit to early menopause hot flashes
yourlife.usatoday.com - 2-25-11
Hot flashes that bedevil many women in menopause might actually be a good thing, depending on when they strike, according to new data from a long-running government study.
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DEA to legalize marijuana chemical for Big Pharma but keep it a crime for everyone else
naturalnews.com - 2-25-11
Have no illusions about the true nature of the so-called "War on Drugs" and the actions of the DEA. The War on Drugs has always been about protecting the profits of the drug companies which have a long and well-documented history of copying street drugs, repackaging them as "medications" and selling them.
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Probiotic Identified to Treat Ulcers
sciencedaily.com - 2-25-11
Researchers from Spain have identified a strain of probiotic bacteria that may be useful in treating ulcers caused by Helicobacter pylori. They report their findings in the February 2011 issue of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.
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Bedside Ultrasound Becomes a Reality
sciencedaily.com - 2-25-11
Clinicians have often referred to ultrasound technology as the "stethoscope of the future," predicting that as the equipment shrinks in size, it will one day be as common at the bedside as that trusty tool around every physician's neck. According to a new report in The New England Journal of Medicine, that day has arrived.
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High Vitamin-D Bread Could Help Solve Widespread Insufficiency Problem
sciencedaily.com - 2-25-11
With most people unable to get enough vitamin D from sunlight or foods, scientists are suggesting that a new vitamin D-fortified food -- bread made with high-vitamin D yeast -- could fill that gap. Their study, confirming that the approach works in laboratory tests, appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.
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Serotonin Plays Role in Many Autism Cases, Studies Confirm
sciencedaily.com - 2-25-11
Mouse models are yielding important clues about the nature of autism spectrum disorders, which impact an estimated one in 110 children in the U.S.[1] In labs at the UT Health Science Center San Antonio, researchers are studying strains of mice that inherently mimic the repetitive and socially impaired behaviors present in these disorders.
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Many Dialysis Patients at Risk for High Radiation Exposure
healthday.com - 2-25-11
A large number of dialysis patients are at increased risk of cancer due to high radiation doses, and doctors should think about reducing these patients' levels of radiation exposure, a new study suggests.
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Herceptin May Boost Long-Term Survival After Aggressive Breast Cancer
healthday.com - 2-25-11
The cancer drug Herceptin produces significantly longer disease-free survival in women with an aggressive type of early-stage breast cancer who take the drug for a year after standard chemotherapy, a new study suggests.
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Air pollution tops cocaine, other factors in number of heart attacks
suntimes.com - 2-24-11
Air pollution contributes to more heart attacks in the population as a whole than negative emotions, sexual activity and cocaine use, according to a new study.
Researchers from Belgium and Switzerland analyzed the results of 36 studies on 13 known heart attack triggers to see which triggers had the largest population-wide impact.
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Many locked-in syndrome patients happy, study shows
msnbc.msn.com - 2-24-11
You are awake, aware and probably unable to move or talk - but you are not necessarily unhappy, says the largest study of locked-in syndrome ever conducted.
A surprising number of patients with the condition say they are happy, despite being paralyzed and having to communicate mainly by moving their eyes. Most cases are caused by major brain damage, often sustained in traumatic accidents.
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High Triglycerides Linked to Stroke Risk
everydayhealth.com - 2-24-11
Elevated nonfasting triglycerides - but not cholesterol levels - were associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke, a large Danish study found.
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Study Backs Marijuana for Cancer Patients
everydayhealth.com - 2-24-11
A synthetic form of THC - the main active chemical in marijuana - may help patients with advanced cancer overcome problems with their senses of taste and smell and regain their enjoyment in eating, a pilot study showed.
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Researchers Discover Biological Pathway Linked to PTSD
abcnews.go.com - 2-24-11
Although most people exposed to the horrors of war, trauma or abuse recover emotionally, up to 20 percent develop post-traumatic stress disorder -- a debilitating psychiatric disorder marked by flashbacks and nightmares.
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Roundup, GMOs linked to emergence of deadly new pathogen causing spontaneous abortions among animals
naturalnews.com - 2-24-11
In a shocking warning letter to USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack, a highly experienced, ex-military pathogen researcher warns that the use of Roundup via GMO crops is resulting in the emergence of a deadly new pathogen -- previously unknown to science -- that's causing widespread spontaneous abortions among cattle. The pathogen appears in high concentrations among even non-GMO crops that are "managed" through the use of glyphosate (Roundup) for weed control.
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Polygamy Hurt 19th Century Mormon Wives' Evolutionary Fitness, Scientists Say
sciencedaily.com - 2-24-11
Polygamy practiced by some 19th century Mormon men had the curious effect of suppressing the overall offspring numbers of Mormon women in plural marriages, say scientists from Indiana University Bloomington and three other institutions in the March 2011 issue of Evolution and Human Behavior.
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Kids Growing Up on Farms Less Likely to Have Asthma
healthday.com - 2-24-11
In a European study that echoes the findings of other scientists, researchers have found that children who grow up on farms are less likely to develop childhood asthma.
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Fast Response Crucial in Outbreaks of Food-Borne Illness: Study
healthday.com - 2-24-11
Nearly three years after a nationwide salmonella outbreak that sickened about 1,500 people and claimed two lives, U.S. epidemiologists have learned that speed is of the essence in identifying sources of food contamination and preventing further infection.
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Coffee, Sex, Smog Can All Trigger Heart Attack, Study Finds
healthday.com - 2-24-11
A major analysis of data on potential triggers for heart attacks finds that many of the substances and activities Americans indulge in every day -- coffee, alcohol, sex, even breathing -- can all help spur an attack.
More...


Medical Leech Linked to Infection
everydayhealth.com - 2-23-11
A resistant Aeromonas infection transmitted by a medicinal leech developed in a man undergoing reconstructive surgery of the jaw, leading to total failure of the graft, investigators reported.
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Kids' brains may hold clues to future criminals
pagingdrgupta.blogs.cnn.com - 2-23-11
Who is going to grow up to become a criminal or psychopath?
Current research in genetics and neuroscience may point towards answers to this question, opening up a whole host of ethical questions about culpability, justice and treatment.
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Yes, oral sex is sex, and it can boost cancer risk
pagingdrgupta.blogs.cnn.com - 2-23-11
Here's a crucial message for teens: Oral sex carries many of the same risks as vaginal sex, including human papilloma virus, or HPV. And HPV may now be overtaking tobacco as the leading cause of oral cancers in America in people under age 50.
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Simple tests can tell who can drive after stroke, study finds
usatoday.com - 2-23-11
A new review of existing research contends that three brief tests could help doctors figure out whether recovering stroke patients are well enough to drive.
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Blood Test May Find Markers of Bladder Cancer Risk
sciencedaily.com - 2-23-11
Knowing that it is impossible to catalog all the carcinogenic exposures a person has had in life and then assess them, Brown University researcher Carmen Marsit is looking for a more precise way to predict individual susceptibility to cancer. In a paper published online Feb. 22, 2011, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Marsit leads a team of scientists in describing a blood test that can accurately detect biomolecular markers of bladder cancer that risky exposures may have left behind.
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Nitroglycerin Ointment Might Strengthen Bones
healthday.com - 2-23-11
Nitroglycerin ointment, usually prescribed to relieve chest pain, may also counter bone loss, a new study suggests.
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More Evidence Ties Moderate Drinking to Heart Health
healthday.com - 2-23-11
Moderate alcohol consumption may help protect against heart disease, according to two new papers by Canadian researchers.
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Cell Phones Affect Areas of the Brain, Study Shows
healthday.com - 2-23-11
A one-hour cell phone conversation stimulates the areas of your brain closest to the phone's antenna, but experts say they still have no idea whether these effects pose any long-term health risk.
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High-fiber diet may help you live longer, study says
seattletimes.nwsource.com - 2-22-11
Eating a diet rich in fiber has long been known to help keep your digestive tract working properly. It's also thought to lower the risk of heart disease, some cancers and diabetes. Now, a new study suggests it could reduce the risk of death from cardiovascular, infectious and respiratory diseases.
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Doc Groups Accused of Spinning Implant Message
everydayhealth.com - 2-22-11
Two plastic surgeon groups instructed doctors to downplay a link between breast implants and a rare cancer when talking to patients, a patient advocacy group says.
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For MS Patients, Memory Melts in Warm Weather
everydayhealth.com - 2-22-11
When it's warm outside, memory - as well as other aspects of cognition including processing speed - slows down for patients with multiple sclerosis, researchers say.
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Breakthrough that could help halt the spread of breast cancer
dailymail.co.uk - 2-22-11
Scientists have discovered how a key chemical is responsible for breast cancer tumours spreading to other organs in the body.
The breakthrough could lead to new treatments being developed to stop the killer disease at an earlier stage, saving tens of thousands of lives a year.
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Brain pacemakers aim to zap severe depression
msnbc.msn.com - 2-22-11
Call them brain pacemakers, tiny implants that hold promise for fighting tough psychiatric diseases - if scientists can figure out just where in all that gray matter to put them.
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Researchers aim to 'print' human skin
cnn.com - 2-22-11
Researchers are developing a specialized skin "printing" system that could be used in the future to treat soldiers wounded on the battlefield.
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NY Times asks: Why aren't GMO foods labeled?
naturalnews.com - 2-22-11
It is a question that more people should be asking, and one that even some in the mainstream media have begun to entertain: why are genetically-modified (GM) foods, which are patently (no pun intended) different from conventional and organic foods, not required to be properly labeled on food packaging? The answer, dictated directly from the public relations departments of Monsanto and friends via the U.S. government, is that GMOs are safe and identical to natural varieties, and do not require differentiation. But this notion is a flat out lie.
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Better Way to Diagnose Pneumonia
sciencedaily.com - 2-22-11
Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology have created a new sampling device that could prevent thousands of people worldwide from dying of pneumonia each year.
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Cholesterol 'does not predict stroke in women'
bbc.co.uk - 2-22-11
High levels of cholesterol do not predict the risk of stroke in women, according to researchers in Denmark.
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Surviving Melanoma May Take Different Toll on Women, Men
healthday.com - 2-22-11
The experience of surviving a melanoma may weigh more heavily on the emotional lives of women than men, a new study suggests.
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Hearing Loss Common Among Middle-Aged Adults: Study
healthday.com - 2-22-11
An estimated 21 percent of Americans aged 48 to 59 struggle with some kind of hearing loss, and the number rises to 90 percent of adults 80 and older, a new study says.
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Holistic Eating: How to Shop for Sustainable Foods
botanical.com - 2-21-11
Holistic eating is an approach to food that takes into account all the various issues that surround what we eat. Holistic eaters consider how a food is produced, how the various foods we eat interact with each other, and how we can balance nutrition with food enjoyment and our overall well-being. But while there are many factors to consider with regard to holistic eating, how and where we buy our foods is the most immediate in our lives. When shopping at the grocery store, you make decisions that can have profound effects on both on your life and on the world as a whole.
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Self-Injury Videos Popular With Teens
medpagetoday.com - 2-21-11
Videos posted online that feature self-injury are popular viewing among young adults and possibly teens -- and some researchers worry that this may encourage copycat behaviors.
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7 Germiest Public Places
abcnews.go.com - 2-21-11
An average adult can touch as many as 30 objects within a minute, including germ-harboring, high-traffic surfaces such as light switches, doorknobs, phone receivers, and remote controls. At home, you do all that you can to keep the germs at bay. But what happens when you step out the door to go to dinner, do some grocery shopping, or visit the doctor's office? Know where germs are most likely to lurk, as you'll find out here.
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Stuttering is in the genes not the head, say scientists
telegraph.co.uk - 2-21-11
Stuttering is not to do with nervousness or a traumatic childhood as portrayed in the award winning film The King's Speech but has its root cause in a genetic disorder, new research suggests.
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Jefferson researchers provide genetic evidence that antioxidants can help treat cancer
eurekalert.org - 2-21-11
Researchers from Jefferson's Kimmel Cancer Center have genetic evidence suggesting the antioxidant drugs currently used to treat lung disease, malaria and even the common cold can also help prevent and treat cancers because they fight against mitochondrial oxidative stress-a culprit in driving tumor growth.
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Tart cherries help speed muscle recovery
naturalnews.com - 2-21-11
A new study published in the American College of Sports Medicine journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise suggests that eating a small amount of tart cherries helps improve muscle recovery in athletes after an intense workout. The findings add to the growing body of evidence that illustrates the amazing healing power of tart cherries.
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Doctors engaged in widespread medical fraud at Madison protests with fake doctor's notes
naturalnews.com - 2-21-11
If you're an eighth grader and you show up to school with a fake doctor's note excusing your suspicious absence the day before, you would probably face detention or some other punishment, including a possible investigation for truancy. But if you're a teacher and you call in "sick" with a fake doctor's note handed to you at a protest in Madison, Wisconsin, then that's apparently okay... because that's what countless public school teachers have been doing the past week.
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New High-Resolution Method for Imaging Below the Skin Using a Liquid Lens
sciencedaily.com - 2-21-11
University of Rochester optics professor Jannick Rolland has developed an optical technology that provides unprecedented images under the skin's surface. The aim of the technology is to detect and examine skin lesions to determine whether they are benign or cancerous without having to cut the suspected tumor out of the skin and analyze it in the lab. Instead, the tip of a roughly one-foot-long cylindrical probe is placed in contact with the tissue, and within seconds a clear, high-resolution, 3D image of what lies below the surface emerges.
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Study Finds Too Many Surgical Breast Biopsies Performed
healthday.com - 2-21-11
Too often surgical breast biopsies, and not less invasive and safer needle biopsies, are being performed on women who have abnormal mammograms, a new study says.
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Can Prescription Amphetamine Use Raise Parkinson's Risk?
healthday.com - 2-21-11
Taking prescription amphetamines may raise your risk of developing Parkinson's disease later, new research suggests.
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Quit smoking and you can still save your skin
dailymail.co.uk - 2-20-11
The harm smoking inflicts on the skin seems superficial compared to heart disease or lung cancer, but it is usually the first - and most visible - damage caused by the habit.
At my clinics in London and Los Angeles I often see women and men - some as young as 30 - who want to rid themselves of the ravaged complexion that smoking has given them. My first message to them is simple: stop smoking.
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Testosterone may bump autism rates in males
msnbc.msn.com - 2-20-11
A new study offers some clues into the mystery of why autism is four times more common in males than in females.
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Why Love Is Good for Your Health
health.com - 2-20-11
Is marriage good for your health? In general, research suggests yes. Married people live longer, have better access to health care, enjoy a more satisfying sex life, experience less stress, live a healthier lifestyle, and have lower rates of heart disease, diabetes, and depression compared to their single counterparts.
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Delivery even a bit early may mean developmental delays
usatoday.com - 2-20-11
Bucking the notion that being born a few weeks early has no discernible impact on babies, a new study indicates that "late preterm" infants face more developmental delays than their full-term peers and those delays may affect their school performance.
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Medical 'experts' pushing HPV vaccines told what not to say about them, including their death toll
naturalnews.com - 2-20-11
Two British doctors recently wrote a piece in the BBC urging the U.K. National Health Service (NHS) to switch from Merck's Cervarix human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to GlaxoSmithKline's (GSK) Gardasil HPV vaccine, in its mass vaccination program for young girls. And the two "experts" admit that they only say publicly what helps the vaccine to be well received by the public.
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Asthma Tied to Bacterial Communities in the Airway
sciencedaily.com - 2-20-11
Asthma may have a surprising relationship with the composition of the species of bacteria that inhabit bronchial airways, a finding that could suggest new treatment or even potential cures for the common inflammatory disease, according to a new UCSF-led study.
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Mind Over Matter: EECoG May Finally Allow Enduring Control of a Prosthetic or a Paralyzed Arm by Thought Alone
sciencedaily.com - 2-20-11
Daniel Moran has dedicated his career to developing the best brain-computer interface, or BCI, he possibly can. His motivation is simple but compelling. "My sophomore year in high school," Moran says, "a good friend and I were on the varsity baseball team. I broke my arm and was out for the season. I was feeling sorry for myself when he slide into home plate head first and broke his neck.
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Key breast cancer 'driver' gene found
bbc.co.uk - 2-20-11
Cancer experts have identified a gene which can cause a particularly aggressive form of breast cancer to develop.
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Leg Discomfort Might Signal Heart Trouble
healthday.com - 2-20-11
A disease the affects your legs could warn you about potential heart trouble, new research suggests.
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Weight Loss Surgery May Cut Knee Osteoarthritis Pain
healthday.com - 2-20-11
Losing weight can help reduce the amount of pain experienced by obese people with knee osteoarthritis, researchers say.
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Speaking two languages may delay Alzheimer's
msnbc.msn.com - 2-19-11
Mastering a second language can pump up the brain in ways that seem to delay getting Alzheimer's disease later on, scientists said Friday.
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Taking short breaks alleviates back pain
usatoday.com - 2-19-11
Preventing back pain might be as easy as getting up from your chair and walking every couple hours, says physician Michael Schafer.
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Male Fertility Is in the Bones: First Evidence That Skeleton Plays a Role in Reproduction
sciencedaily.com - 2-19-11
Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have discovered that the skeleton acts as a regulator of fertility in male mice through a hormone released by bone, known as osteocalcin.
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Fountain of Youth from the Tap? Environmental Lithium Uptake Promotes Longevity, Scientists Demonstrate in Worms
sciencedaily.com - 2-19-11
A regular uptake of the trace element lithium can considerably promote longevity. This is the result of a new study by scientists of Friedrich Schiller University Jena.
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Brain and body training treats ME, UK study says
bbc.co.uk - 2-19-11
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, also known as ME, should be treated with a form of behavioural therapy or exercise, say British scientists.
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Peer Support Beats Usual Care for Depression, Analysis Finds
healthday.com - 2-19-11
A new analysis of existing research finds that peer support may do a better job of treating depression than standard care.
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TV Reporter's Severe Migraine Mimicked a Stroke
healthday.com - 2-19-11
Many people who watched Los Angeles TV reporter Serene Branson suffer what appeared to be a stroke while covering the Grammy awards last Sunday were no doubt relieved to hear her troubles were apparently caused by a severe migraine headache.
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Remedies: Clove Oil for Tooth Pain
nytimes.com - 2-18-11
More than a third of American adults use some form of complementary or alternative medicine, according to a government report. Natural remedies have an obvious appeal, but how do you know which ones to choose and whether the claims are backed by science?
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A.D.H.D.: To Medicate or Not to Medicate?
nytimes.com - 2-18-11
Do drugs for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder need to be taken for life? Are they dangerous? Are there alternatives to medications?
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Ecuadorean Villagers May Hold Secret to Longevity
nytimes.com - 2-18-11
People living in remote villages in Ecuador have a mutation that some biologists say may throw light on human longevity and ways to increase it.
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Zinc lozenges effectively prevent, reduce duration of common colds
naturalnews.com - 2-18-11
A comprehensive review of more than a dozen studies has shown that common zinc lozenges and supplements are effective at reducing the duration of the common cold, particularly when taken within the first 24 hours of visible symptoms. Published in The Cochrane Library, the review adds to the large body of evidence proving that zinc is a vital mineral for maintaining optimal health.
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Cancer causing chemicals found in cola coloring ingredient
naturalnews.com - 2-18-11
The "caramel coloring" used to color all the top cola brands isn't natural caramel coloring at all. Instead, it's made by reacting sugars with ammonia and sulfites at high temperatures. This reaction results in the formation of 2-methylimidazole and 4-methylimidazole, both of which are chemicals documented by the U.S. government to cause cancer in mammals.
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Promising Treatment for Heroin Dependency
sciencedaily.com - 2-18-11
A new treatment using naltrexone implants could lead to a significant reduction in heroin dependency. According to the researchers responsible for a recent Norwegian study, this should have major implications for the treatment options offered to heroin-dependent patients.
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New Testing Could Replace Colonoscopies in the Future
sciencedaily.com - 2-18-11
Nobody enjoys colonoscopies, including mice. University of Missouri researchers are excited about the potential of using genetic biomarkers to predict colon cancer caused by inflammation. A new method developed at the MU Research Animal Diagnostic Laboratory (RADIL) could eventually lead to a method that might eliminate colonoscopies altogether.
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Negative experiences can stop painkillers working
bbc.co.uk - 2-18-11
A patient's belief that a drug will not work can become a self fulfilling prophecy, according to researchers.
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Brain and body training treats ME, UK study says
bbc.co.uk - 2-18-11
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, also known as ME, should be treated with a form of behavioural therapy or exercise, say British scientists.
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Warm Weather May Cloud Thinking in MS Patients
healthday.com - 2-18-11
People with multiple sclerosis may have more problems remembering, learning and processing information in warm weather than in cooler months, a small study suggests.
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Pre-Run Stretching Doesn't Prevent Injuries, Study Finds
healthday.com - 2-18-11
Runners who stretched before running were no less likely to get injured than runners who didn't bother to stretch, new research finds.
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Herbal medicine to be regulated, says Andrew Lansley
telegraph.co.uk - 2-17-11
Herbal and Chinese medicine practitioners will be allowed to continue trading under Government plans to side-step a European ban on unlicensed treatments.
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Cases of rare superbug rise tenfold since 2005
telegraph.co.uk - 2-17-11
Only 224 people in England were infected with the potentially fatal toxin Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) in 2005, but by last year there were 2,227 cases.
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CDC report: Inactivity highest in Southern, Appalachian states
usatoday.com - 2-17-11
Colorado has one of the most active populations in the country and Kentucky has one of the least active, according to a new government study that looked at people's physical activity county by county.
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Jefferson researchers provide genetic evidence that antioxidants can help treat cancer
eurekalert.org - 2-17-11
Researchers from Jefferson's Kimmel Cancer Center have genetic evidence suggesting the antioxidant drugs currently used to treat lung disease, malaria and even the common cold can also help prevent and treat cancers because they fight against mitochondrial oxidative stress-a culprit in driving tumor growth.
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GM alfalfa cannot be contained, will spread everywhere, say experts
naturalnews.com - 2-17-11
Ever since Obama-appointed U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) head Tom Vilsack deregulated Monsanto's genetically-modified (GM) alfalfa, there has been a firestorm of controversy over the long-term negative consequences of this thoughtless decision. Various experts in the field of agriculture have since come forth and declared that, despite rhetoric to the contrary, it will be impossible to contain GM alfalfa and prevent it from eventually contaminating the entire food chain.
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Exposed: Fake Chinese organics try to slip into US market
naturalnews.com - 2-17-11
There seems to be no shortage of fraud coming out of China these days, with a recent report issued by the non-profit Cornucopia Institute (CI) stating that a certain Chinese agricultural supplier has attempted to export fake organic products into the U.S. The report states that the supplier forged fake organic certification documents in an effort to capitalize on the large and growing U.S. market for organic products.
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Regrowing Hair: Researchers May Have Accidentally Discovered a Solution
sciencedaily.com - 2-17-11
It has been long known that stress plays a part not just in the graying of hair but in hair loss as well. Over the years, numerous hair-restoration remedies have emerged, ranging from hucksters' "miracle solvents" to legitimate medications such as minoxidil. But even the best of these have shown limited effectiveness.
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Placebo Effect May Work in Reverse
healthday.com - 2-17-11
Everyone's heard of the placebo effect: when you take a sugar pill but believe it is medicine, it tends to work. Now a new study suggests that the opposite may also be true.
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New Eye Treatment May Save Preemies' Sight
healthday.com - 2-17-11
A new study holds potentially good news for preterm infants who develop an eye condition that may cause blindness: An inexpensive drug appears to do a better job of treating the condition than the existing therapy.
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Revealed at last: The secret recipe for Coca-Cola
news.com.au - 2-16-11
  * Website claims to have found secret
  * Merchandise 7X includes vanilla, lime
  * Recipe guarded 24 hours a day in vault
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Can Zinc Kill the Common Cold? Doctors Skeptical
abcnews.go.com - 2-16-11
The ongoing debate over the role of zinc in combating the common cold was reinvigorated today by a report that suggests the supplement might modestly reduce cold duration and severity -- or maybe even prevent it. But the report, published as a Cochrane Review, raised questions among doctors about the quality of the findings and whether people should start taking zinc for colds.
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Zinc can be an 'effective treatment' for common colds
bbc.co.uk - 2-16-11
Taking zinc syrup, tablets or lozenges can lessen the severity and duration of the common cold, experts believe.
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Could Hair Loss at 20 Signal Higher Prostate Cancer Risk?
healthday.com - 2-16-11
Men with prostate cancer may be twice as likely to have started showing signs of male pattern baldness at the age of 20 than those without prostate cancer, a new French study suggests.
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PSA Test Cut-off Could Signal Low-Risk Prostate Cancer
healthday.com - 2-16-11
Men who have a low prostate-specific antigen (PSA) score when they're first tested may not need to be screened annually and probably don't need to undergo a biopsy, a new study suggests.
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Yes, you CAN sleep like a baby: The surprising reasons for your snooze problems...and the secrets of successful sleeping
dailymail.co.uk - 2-15-11
Sleep problems are not just tiring and frustrating, they can also cause health problems, raising the risk of heart disease and stroke, according to a study recently published in the European Heart Journal.
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ADHD brains may have 'faulty brakes'
pagingdrgupta.blogs.cnn.com - 2-15-11
Much news about attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder has focused on learning and attention, but here's another important part of this condition: Impairment in motor function.
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Bad breath? Break free -- and how to tell a friend
cnn.com - 2-15-11
Ida Alvarez avoided close conversations. She was afraid of what someone might tell her. She was pretty sure she had really bad breath.
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Milkweed sap cures common skin cancers
naturalnews.com - 2-15-11
If you talk about herbs, plants and other totally natural substances having the potential to actually cure cancer, odds are you'll be greeted with eye-rolling and disbelief -- especially from the mainstream medical establishment. But research just published in the Journal of British Dermatology provides compelling evidence that the sap from a common weed known as milkweed or petty surge can literally cure certain types of cancers.
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Chinese companies mass producing fake rice out of plastic
naturalnews.com - 2-15-11
The Chinese food contamination freak show is back in full swing with new reports out of Singapore indicating that certain Chinese companies are now mass producing and selling fake rice to unwitting villagers. According to a report in the Korean-language Weekly Hong Kong, the manufacturers are blending potatoes, sweet potatoes, and plastic industrial resin to produce the imitation rice.
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Estrogen Reduces Breast Cancer Stem Cells and Aggression in Breast Cancer, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 2-15-11
A team of researchers at CIC bioGUNE has revealed that estrogen can reduce the risk of breast cancer. Their work shows that estrogen is capable of reducing the number of breast cancer stem cells, which may explain the lower aggression of the tumor and, as a consequence, the possibility of a better prognosis.
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Don't Blame the Pill for Estrogen in Drinking Water
sciencedaily.com - 2-15-11
Contrary to popular belief, birth control pills account for less than 1 percent of the estrogens found in the nation's drinking water supplies, scientists have concluded in an analysis of studies published on the topic. Their report suggests that most of the sex hormone -- source of concern as an endocrine disruptor with possible adverse effects on people and wildlife -- enters drinking water supplies from other sources. The report appears in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology.
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Women With Eating Disorders Draw a Different Picture of Themselves Than Women Without, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 2-15-11
Women suffering from anorexia or bulimia draw themselves with prominently different characteristics than women who do not have eating disorders and who are considered of normal weight. This has been revealed in a new joint study from the University of Haifa, Soroka University Medical Center and Achva Academic College, Israel, published in The Arts in Psychotherapy.
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Parasites' struggle for survival 'makes malaria deadly'
bbc.co.uk - 2-15-11
Edinburgh University scientists have claimed malaria is particularly deadly because the parasites which carry it battle other infections for survival.
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Study Suggests Hearing Loss-Dementia Link
consumer.healthday.com - 2-15-11
Adults who experience hearing loss may face a higher risk of dementia and perhaps Alzheimer's disease than those who don't suffer hearing loss, new research suggests.
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Diet High in Fiber Might Lengthen Your Life
consumer.healthday.com - 2-15-11
Eating a diet rich in fiber may reduce your risk of dying from heart disease, respiratory disease or any other cause by 22 percent, researchers from the U.S. National Cancer Institute report.
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Obesity Alone Raises Risk of Fatal Heart Attack, Study Finds
consumer.healthday.com - 2-15-11
Obese men face a dramatically higher risk of dying from a heart attack, regardless of whether or not they have other known risk factors for cardiovascular disease, a new study reveals.
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UM Study Says Energy Drinks Pose Serious Risk to Kids
nbcmiami.com - 2-15-11
Energy drinks not only may make your kid hyper, but it turns out they might also make them seriously unhealthy.
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US study links pesticides to Parkinson's disease
news.yahoo.com - 2-14-11
US researchers said Friday they have found that people who used two specific varieties of pesticide were 2.5 times as likely to develop Parkinson's disease.
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Mothers-to-be will be taught to hypnotise themselves before giving birth in NHS trial
dailymail.co.uk - 2-14-11
Expectant mothers will be taught to hypnotise themselves before giving birth as an alternative to painkillers.
They will learn to put themselves in a trance-like state during labour in the hope that they will not need costly drug treatments such as epidurals, laughing gas or morphine.
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Laughing gas returning as option for laboring moms
msnbc.msn.com - 2-14-11
The use of nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, during childbirth fell out of favor in the United States decades ago, and just two hospitals - one in San Francisco and one in Seattle - still offer it. But interest in returning the dentist office staple to the delivery room is growing: respected hospitals including Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center plan to start offering it, the federal government is reviewing it, and after a long hiatus, the equipment needed to administer it is expected to hit the market soon.
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A dose of the cold could help weight loss and reduce heart disease
telegraph.co.uk - 2-14-11
Scientists have found that exposure to the cold can cause a little known type of fat tissue, called brown adipose tissue, to clear harmful fat molecules from the blood stream.
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A glass of wine a day helps prevent diabetes
naturalnews.com - 2-14-11
A single glass of red wine may be as effective at controlling blood sugar as standard diabetes drugs, according to a study conducted by researchers from the University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences in Vienna, Austria.
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Homeopathy for children's emotional health
naturalnews.com - 2-14-11
Most parents would never think of giving a child Valium or Prozac. We know their physical bodies are too delicate, but their emotional life is also very delicate. Yet they are subject to much of the same stresses as adults and need safe remedies to help support their nervous systems.
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Offspring of Female Rats Given Folic Acid Supplements Develop More Breast Cancer, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 2-14-11
The daughters of rats who took folic acid supplements before conception, during pregnancy and while breastfeeding have breast cancer rates twice as high as other rats, according to a new study.
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Mummy Remains Show False Toes Helped Ancient Egyptians Walk
sciencedaily.com - 2-14-11
Two artificial big toes -- one found attached to the foot of an ancient Egyptian mummy -- may have been the world's earliest functional prosthetic body parts, says the scientist who tested replicas on volunteers.
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Weight Guidelines May Be High for Severely Obese Moms-to-Be
consumer.healthday.com - 2-14-11
Current U.S. guidelines may overestimate the amount of weight that severely obese women need to gain during pregnancy, according to a new study.
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Berries May Offer Sweet Protection Against Parkinson's Disease
consumer.healthday.com - 2-14-11
People who eat foods rich in antioxidants called flavonoids, especially berries, may be protecting themselves from developing Parkinson's disease, a new study suggests.
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Montana House votes to repeal medical marijuana law
coloradoindependent.com - 2-13-11
The Montana House of Representatives voted 63-37 yesterday to overturn that state's medical marijuana law. The State Senate is expected to follow suit soon. Both houses are controlled by Republicans.
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Sweet potato makes a comeback as a popular food (it's healthier, too!)
naturalnews.com - 2-13-11
Once considered a fringe food by the U.S. culinary mainstream, sweet potatoes are fast becoming popular everywhere from fast food chains to gourmet restaurants and the White House table.
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Vitamin D helps prevent multiple sclerosis
naturalnews.com - 2-13-11
For the first time, researchers have observed that having high vitamin D levels is clearly linked to warding off multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic autoimmune disease that affects the brain and spinal cord. Published in the American Academy of Neurology journal Neurology, the study found that having high vitamin D levels helps prevent the development of MS in those who are beginning to observe symptoms of its onset.
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Breastfeeding prevents seizures, study finds
naturalnews.com - 2-13-11
The longer a mother breastfeeds her baby, the less likely the child is to have seizures later in life, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Pediatrics. Danish researchers observed that babies who are breastfed for at least the first nine months are nearly half as likely to experience seizures than babies breastfed for only the first three months.
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Compound Blocks Brain Cell Destruction in Parkinson's Disease; Findings May Open Door to First Protective Therapy
sciencedaily.com - 2-13-11
Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have produced the first known compound to show significant effectiveness in protecting brain cells directly affected by Parkinson's disease, a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disorder.
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Kids With ADHD Much More Likely to Develop Substance Abuse Problems as They Age, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 2-13-11
Children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder are two to three times more likely than children without the disorder to develop serious substance abuse problems in adolescence and adulthood, according to a study by UCLA psychologists and colleagues at the University of South Carolina.
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Acute Anemia Linked to Silent Strokes in Children
sciencedaily.com - 2-13-11
Silent strokes, which have no immediate symptoms but could cause long-term cognitive and learning deficits, occur in a significant number of severely anemic children, especially those with sickle cell disease, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2011.
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Diet soda tied to stroke risk, but reasons unclear
usatoday.com - 2-12-11
It's far from definitive proof, but new research raises concern about diet soda, finding higher risks for stroke and heart attack among people who drink it everyday versus those who drink no soda at all.
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Reduced Levels of an Important Neurotransmitter Found in Multiple Sclerosis Patients
sciencedaily.com - 2-12-11
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have shown for the first time that damage to a particular area of the brain and a consequent reduction in noradrenaline are associated with multiple sclerosis.
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Scientists Combine Targeted Agents to Kill Multiple Myeloma Cells
sciencedaily.com - 2-12-11
Scientists at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center have developed a novel treatment strategy for multiple myeloma that pairs two targeted agents to kill cancer cells. The study's findings, published in the journal Blood, are the first to demonstrate the synergistic, anti-myeloma effects of this combination regimen both in vitro and in vivo.
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Experts Urge Even Greater Caution in Use of X-Rays During Pregnancy and Infancy
sciencedaily.com - 2-12-11
Clinicians should be careful about using x-rays on pregnant women and infants because of the potential for a slight increase in the risk of children developing cancer, concludes a new study published on the British Medical Journal website.
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New Drug Treatment Possibilities for Alzheimer's
sciencedaily.com - 2-12-11
UC Santa Barbara scientists have made a discovery that has the potential for use in the early diagnosis and eventual treatment of plaque-related diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Type 2 diabetes.
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Overweight Kids Who Exercise Improve Thinking, Math Skills: Study
consumer.healthday.com - 2-12-11
When overweight, sedentary kids start to exercise regularly, their ability to think, to plan and even to do math improves, a new study suggests.
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FDA Approves First 3D Mammogram Device
consumer.healthday.com - 2-12-11
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved on Friday the first X-ray mammography device that provides three-dimensional images of the breast for cancer screening and diagnosis.
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Stroke Hospitalizations Up in Teens, Young Adults
consumer.healthday.com - 2-11-11
Older Americans are suffering fewer strokes, but new government research shows that stroke hospitalizations are sharply rising among children and younger adults, especially for men under 35.
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Virus, Parasite May Combine to Increase Harm to Humans
sciencedaily.com - 2-11-11
A parasite and a virus may be teaming up in a way that increases the parasite's ability to harm humans, scientists at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis recently reported in Science.
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New Hybrid Drug, Derived from Common Spice, May Protect, Rebuild Brain Cells After Stroke
sciencedaily.com - 2-11-11
Whether or not you're fond of Indian, Southeast Asian and Middle Eastern food, stroke researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center think you may become a fan of one of their key spices.
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Natural Toxin Implicated as Triggering Parkinson's Disease
sciencedaily.com - 2-11-11
Research from Saint Louis University, investigators have found evidence that a toxin produced by the brain is responsible for the series of cellular events that lead to Parkinson's disease. The study, published in PLoS One, found that the brain toxin DOPAL plays a key role in killing the dopamine neurons which trigger the illness.
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Experimental Agent Better Than Aspirin at Preventing Stroke, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 2-11-11
A new anti-clotting agent is vastly superior to aspirin at reducing stroke risk (1.6 percent per year versus 3.6 percent per year) in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients unable to take stronger drugs, according to final data reported February 10 at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2011. Researchers found the drug also works better in people with a history of stroke or a warning stroke.
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Two cancer drugs keep rare pancreatic tumors in check
usatoday.com - 2-11-11
Two new drugs offer promise in treating the rare type of pancreatic tumor afflicting a small number of Americans - including Apple CEO Steve Jobs.
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Eating solids too early can pave the path to obesity for formula-fed infants, a new study shows
nydailynews.com - 2-11-11
Formula-fed babies are more likely to become fat kids if they start noshing solid foods too soon, a new study says.
Doctors followed the eating habits of 847 children, looking to see if there was a link between obesity and when babies were first fed solid foods such as rice cereal, biscuits or fruit. They found that tykes who drink formula, rather than breast milk, are six times more likely to be obese by the time they are 3.
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New Drug May Help Patients With Irregular Heartbeat Avoid Stroke
healthday.com - 2-11-11
A new anti-clotting drug works better than aspirin for stroke prevention in some patients with the common, sometimes lethal, heart rhythm problem known as atrial fibrillation, according to research presented Thursday.
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Few Stroke Patients Given Clot-Buster Quickly Enough: Study
healthday.com - 2-11-11
Few eligible stroke patients get an injectable clot-busting drug within the recommended 60-minute window after their hospital arrival, new research finds.
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Male sex hormone testosterone 'interferes with empathy'
bbc.co.uk - 2-11-11
Giving women a small dose of the male sex hormone testosterone makes them less able to empathise with others, say UK and Dutch researchers.
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Spice drug fights stroke damage
bbc.co.uk - 2-11-11
A drug derived from the curry spice turmeric may be able to help the body repair some of the damage caused in the immediate aftermath of a stroke.
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Roasting coffee beans a dark brown creates powerful antioxidants
naturalnews.com - 2-11-11
Drink too much coffee and you can suffer from anxiety, heart palpitations and insomnia. But in moderate quantities, coffee can offer health benefits -- including slashing the risk of certain cancers. It may even lower the chance of developing dementia(http://www.naturalnews.com/025737_c...).
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Mexico rejects Monsanto's GMO corn
naturalnews.com - 2-11-11
Mexican officials seem to have more common sense than American officials, with their continued denouncement of Monsanto's genetically-modified (GM) corn. Mexico has kept in effect a moratorium on Monsanto's GM corn since 2005, citing a lack of safety studies and evidence showing the "Frankencorn" is safe, and that it will not cross-contaminate non-GM crops. The Mexican government recently denied Monsanto's request to expand a pilot program for its crops in Northern Mexico as well.
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Organic giants Whole Foods, Organic Valley, and Stonyfield accused of compromising on GMOs
naturalnews.com - 2-11-11
Some of the nation's largest and most widely known producers and retailers of natural and organic products have decided to push for a compromise with the Monsanto-influenced U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) on the issue of genetically-modified organisms (GMO). In the wake of the recent decision by the Obama administration to carelessly deregulate genetically-modified (GM) alfalfa, Whole Foods Market and several other companies, including Organic Valley and Stonyfield, have expressed support for what they call "coexistence" between organics and GMOs.
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Mexican-American stroke cases to soar
upi.com/Health_News - 2-11-11
The number of Mexican-American stroke victims is expected to soar 350 percent in the next 40 years, U.S. researchers forecast.
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Half a pint a day keeps the doctor away: School milk cuts risk of bowel cancer by 40%
dailymail.co.uk - 2-11-11
Children who drink school milk are up to 40 per cent less likely to suffer bowel cancer as adults, a study shows.
A half-pint a day had a strong protective effect against the disease, which kills more than 16,000 a year in the UK.
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It's in the genes: Scientists solve the mystery of sleepwalking
dailymail.co.uk - 2-9-11
It's a disorder that can be embarrassing and even dangerous, but scientists now believe they have discovered one of the secrets behind sleepwalking.
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Too many late nights causes health 'ticking time bomb'
telegraph.co.uk - 2-9-11
The growing trend for burning the candle at both ends and sleeping too little at night is causing a "ticking time bomb" of health problems, heart doctors have warned.
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Iron, folic acid supplements during pregnancy make kids smarter
naturalnews.com - 2-9-11
Giving pregnant women folic acid and iron supplements may increase the intelligence of their children later in life, according to a study conduced by researchers from Johns Hopkins University and published in the "Journal of the American Medical Association."
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Sun exposure and vitamin D may prevent multiple sclerosis
naturalnews.com - 2-9-11
For decades, scientists have noticed something odd about the condition known as multiple sclerosis (MS). This chronic disease of the brain and spinal cord is less likely to occur in people who live in warmer climates than those dwelling in colder places. Now a study published in the February 8, 2011, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, provides a compelling reason why this is true. People who spend more time outside in the sun and those with higher vitamin D levels are far less likely to ever develop MS than those with inadequate sun exposure and low levels of vitamin D.
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Conceptualizing Cancer Cells as Ancient 'Toolkit'
sciencedaily.com - 2-9-11
Despite decades of research and billions of dollars, cancer remains a major killer, with an uncanny ability to evade both the body's defenses and medical intervention. Now an Arizona State University scientist believes he has an explanation.
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Swine flu narcolepsy 'link' probed by WHO
bbc.co.uk - 2-9-11
At least 12 countries have reported a possible link between a swine flu jab and a rare sleeping disorder, the World Health Organization has confirmed.
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Heavy Drinking in Teen Years May Continue Into Adulthood
healthday.com - 2-9-11
Heavy drinking in the late teen years often continues into adulthood and is associated with long-term alcohol-related problems, researchers warn.
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Warming Injections May Take Out the Sting
healthday.com - 2-9-11
An injection of local anesthetic can be made much less painful if it is warmed beforehand, Canadian researchers report.
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Removing Many Lymph Nodes in Early Breast Cancer Not Always Needed: Study
healthday.com - 2-9-11
Removing many lymph nodes may not be necessary in women with early breast cancer who also undergo a lumpectomy to remove the mass, followed by radiation.
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New Heart Failure Therapy Proves Most Effective in Women
healthday.com - 2-8-11
A therapy to prevent heart failure is twice as effective in women as in men, a new study finds.
It's the first time that a heart treatment has been shown to offer greater benefit to women, the researchers added.
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Forget the Fifth Grader, Are You Smarter Than a Chimp?
abcnews.go.com - 2-8-11
We cooperate more than other primates, right? With our extensive systems of governance and such global cooperative networks as the United Nations and the World Health Organization, humans are expert cooperators when compared with other animals or even relative primates, such as chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys.
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Cancer on the Rise in Developing Countries: Report
businessweek.com - 2-8-11
To mark World Cancer Day, the American Cancer Society issued a new report Friday warning that changing lifestyles linked to economic growth in developing countries are driving up the global incidence of several cancers.
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Mindfulness meditation benefits and changes brain structures in 8 weeks
naturalnews.com - 2-8-11
Meditation is just a way to relax and maybe calm you down for the moment, right? Wrong. Not only will most regular meditators tell you that meditation makes them feel better emotionally and physically, but now there is also scientific evidence that regular meditation literally changes the body -- specifically, it changes the brain in ways that appear to be beneficial.
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Drug companies panic as thirteen 'blockbuster' drugs about to lose patent protection
naturalnews.com - 2-8-11
Reports indicate that the drug industry is in a panic over the patent losses of 13 big-money drugs, and many others, within the next few years. Everyone knows that the drug industry thrives on developing "blockbuster" drugs that reap huge profits during their initial patent period, after which generic competitors can come in and begin producing the same drugs for less. But Big Pharma is having trouble developing new blockbusters to take the places the old blockbusters, which could hit industry profits.
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Feds blame US health care system, not poor diet and lack of exercise, for widespread heart disease
naturalnews.com - 2-8-11
Political agendas often make the government say some pretty strange and illogical statements at times, including a recent announcement from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that the U.S. health care system, not a poor diet and lack of exercise, is responsible for causing heart disease. The announcement was conveniently made as the U.S. Congress and numerous U.S. states are challenging the constitutionality of Obamacare.
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Exposure to pesticides in womb linked to learning disabilities
usatoday.com - 2-8-11
Babies exposed to high levels of pesticides while in the womb may suffer from learning problems, a new study suggests.
The study focused on a chemical called permethrin, one of the pyrethroid pesticides, commonly used in agriculture and to kill termites, fleas and household bugs, says lead author Megan Horton of the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health. Most of the pregnant women in this New York-based study were exposed by spraying for cockroaches.
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Dark chocolate may be healthier than fruit juices for a healthy heart: study
nydailynews.com - 2-8-11
Forget fruit juice - chocolate could be an even better way to boost your health, new research shows.
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Feeding babies with solid food early raises obesity risk later: study
xinhuanet.com - 2-8-11
U.S. researchers have found that feeding babies with solid foods too early was associated with increased odds of obesity later.
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Pot Use Might Speed Onset of Psychosis: Study
healthday.com - 2-8-11
Smoking marijuana might trigger an earlier onset of psychosis, a new analysis of previously published research suggests.
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Junk food diet linked to lower IQ - study
france24.com - 2-8-11
Toddlers who have a diet high in processed foods may have a slightly lower IQ in later life, according to a British study described as the biggest research of its kind.
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New Heart Failure Therapy Proves Most Effective in Women
healthday.com - 2-8-11
A therapy to prevent heart failure is twice as effective in women as in men, a new study finds.
It's the first time that a heart treatment has been shown to offer greater benefit to women, the researchers added.
More...


Forget the Fifth Grader, Are You Smarter Than a Chimp?
abcnews.go.com - 2-8-11
We cooperate more than other primates, right? With our extensive systems of governance and such global cooperative networks as the United Nations and the World Health Organization, humans are expert cooperators when compared with other animals or even relative primates, such as chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys.
More...


Cancer on the Rise in Developing Countries: Report
businessweek.com - 2-8-11
To mark World Cancer Day, the American Cancer Society issued a new report Friday warning that changing lifestyles linked to economic growth in developing countries are driving up the global incidence of several cancers.
More...


Mindfulness meditation benefits and changes brain structures in 8 weeks
naturalnews.com - 2-8-11
Meditation is just a way to relax and maybe calm you down for the moment, right? Wrong. Not only will most regular meditators tell you that meditation makes them feel better emotionally and physically, but now there is also scientific evidence that regular meditation literally changes the body -- specifically, it changes the brain in ways that appear to be beneficial.
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Drug companies panic as thirteen 'blockbuster' drugs about to lose patent protection
naturalnews.com - 2-8-11
Reports indicate that the drug industry is in a panic over the patent losses of 13 big-money drugs, and many others, within the next few years. Everyone knows that the drug industry thrives on developing "blockbuster" drugs that reap huge profits during their initial patent period, after which generic competitors can come in and begin producing the same drugs for less. But Big Pharma is having trouble developing new blockbusters to take the places the old blockbusters, which could hit industry profits.
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Feds blame US health care system, not poor diet and lack of exercise, for widespread heart disease
naturalnews.com - 2-8-11
Political agendas often make the government say some pretty strange and illogical statements at times, including a recent announcement from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that the U.S. health care system, not a poor diet and lack of exercise, is responsible for causing heart disease. The announcement was conveniently made as the U.S. Congress and numerous U.S. states are challenging the constitutionality of Obamacare.
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Exposure to pesticides in womb linked to learning disabilities
usatoday.com - 2-8-11
Babies exposed to high levels of pesticides while in the womb may suffer from learning problems, a new study suggests.
The study focused on a chemical called permethrin, one of the pyrethroid pesticides, commonly used in agriculture and to kill termites, fleas and household bugs, says lead author Megan Horton of the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health. Most of the pregnant women in this New York-based study were exposed by spraying for cockroaches.
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Dark chocolate may be healthier than fruit juices for a healthy heart: study
nydailynews.com - 2-8-11
Forget fruit juice - chocolate could be an even better way to boost your health, new research shows.
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Feeding babies with solid food early raises obesity risk later: study
xinhuanet.com - 2-8-11
U.S. researchers have found that feeding babies with solid foods too early was associated with increased odds of obesity later.
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Pot Use Might Speed Onset of Psychosis: Study
healthday.com - 2-8-11
Smoking marijuana might trigger an earlier onset of psychosis, a new analysis of previously published research suggests.
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Junk food diet linked to lower IQ - study
france24.com - 2-8-11
Toddlers who have a diet high in processed foods may have a slightly lower IQ in later life, according to a British study described as the biggest research of its kind.
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The bedbug summit - banishing the itchy insects
bbc.co.uk - 2-7-11
More than 300 people have gathered at the National Bedbug Summit in Washington DC to try to find ways to deal with the growing problem of infestations. Experts say bedbugs are now the "toughest pests to control", and that the insects are becoming more resistant to chemical treatments.
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Yoga's Stress Relief: An Aid for Infertility?
nytimes.com - 2-7-11
KIMBERLY SORANNO, a 39-year-old Brooklynite undergoing an in vitro fertilization cycle as part of her quest to become pregnant, had gone to her share of yoga classes, but never one like that held on a recent Tuesday night in a reception area of the New York University Fertility Center. There were no deep twists or headstands; just easy "restorative" poses as the teacher, Tracy Toon Spencer, guided the participants - most of them women struggling to conceive - to let go of their worries.
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Chemical from tropical flower latest weapon against wrinkles
telegraph.co.uk - 2-7-11
Rhamnose, from the Uncaria flower, nicknamed cat claw, is said to actively regenerate skin, making it feel plumper and more elastic.
The chemical - which is being incorporated in a cream - is thought to stimulate cells into producing collagen, the main component of connective tissues such as skin.
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Adult ADHD Significantly Increases Risk of Common Form of Dementia, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 2-7-11
Adults who suffer from attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more than three times as likely to develop a common form of degenerative dementia than those without, according to research in the January issue of the European Journal of Neurology.
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Incidence of Skin Cancer Rising at Alarming Rate
sciencedaily.com - 2-7-11
For many young adults, the serious health consequences of tanning have been shown to have little impact on their behavior when it comes to sun exposure. But with spring break around the corner, dermatologists are urging people -- particularly young adults -- to practice proper sun protection and understand the importance of early detection of skin cancer, the most common type of cancer.
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http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110205141314.htm
sciencedaily.com - 2-7-11
An unexpected immune protein exacerbates cancer due to sun exposure, report researchers in the January 27th issue of Nature. The study suggests that drugs blocking the protein might halt tumor growth in skin cancer patients.
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Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Key Mechanism in Geographic Atrophy Identified, 2 Possible Therapies
sciencedaily.com - 2-7-11
A team of researchers, led by University of Kentucky ophthalmologist Dr. Jayakrishna Ambati, has discovered a molecular mechanism implicated in geographic atrophy, the major cause of untreatable blindness in the industrialized world.
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Age related macular degeneration clue discovered
bbc.co.uk - 2-7-11
An international team of researchers have found a clue to one of the leading causes of blindness, which they hope could eventually lead to a cure.
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Mechanism Involved in Breast Cancer's Spread to Bone Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 2-6-11
In a discovery that may lead to a new treatment for breast cancer that has spread to the bone, a Princeton University research team has unraveled a mystery about how these tumors take root.
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Low energy lightbulbs 'could harm 40,000'
telegraph.co.uk - 2-6-11
Low energy light bulbs could exacerbate the health conditions of up to 40,000 people across Britain, a minister has said.
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EU Commission tries to destroy zero tolerance policy for GMO food contamination
naturalnews.com - 2-6-11
The European Union (E.U.) Commission, at the behest of lobbyists from the biotechnology, food, and animal feed industries, is proposing to undo a long-held "zero-tolerance" policy that protects the European food supply from contamination by unapproved genetically-modified organisms (GMO). If successful, the Commission's efforts will open wide the floodgates for imported GMO foodstuffs to further contaminate its food supply.
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'King's Speech' earns praise from kids who stutter
usatoday.com - 2-6-11
A movie about a stuttering monarch, without sex, car chases or sinewy super heroes, hardly sounds like blockbuster box-office fare.
But in a less flashy way, "The King's Speech" is about a hero, one who battles an invisible enemy that torments nearly 70 million people around the world. In demystifying the little-understood speech impediment, the award-winning film reveals myths and fascinating truths about stuttering, and has won praise from stutterers of all ages.
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FDA Approves First Drug to Prevent Premature Births
healthday.com - 2-6-11
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first drug to help prevent premature birth in women who have had at least one previous preterm delivery.
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UPDATE 3-USDA partially deregulating biotech sugar beets
reuters.com - 2-5-11
U.S. agricultural regulators on Friday said despite a court ban, they would allow commercial planting of genetically modified sugar beets under closely controlled conditions while they complete a full environmental impact statement.
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Bone drug 'could give you another five years of life'
dailymail.co.uk - 2-5-11
A drug taken by hundreds of thousands of women for osteoporosis could extend life by up to five years, scientists claim.
Bisphosphonates - the most commonly prescribed treatments for the bone-thinning disease - have been shown to reduce death rates by as much as 80 per cent among those over 75.
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Talk like your sweetie? What that says about your relationship
msnbc.msn.com - 2-5-11
It was around the time when Emily Taffel-Schaper accidentally called her mom "dude" when she realized: She was starting to talk exactly like her now-husband, Fritz Schaper.
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'Star Trek' skin gun heals burns wounds in days
telegraph.co.uk - 2-5-11
The spray-gun which fires stem cells on to the damaged skin has already been used successfully on a dozen patients.
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EPA to regulate rocket fuel chemical in drinking water for causing the same problems as fluoride
naturalnews.com - 2-5-11
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified the need to set a limit on the amount of perchlorate, a toxic chemical found in rocket fuel, that is permissible in water supplies. The agency says perchlorates negatively affects the body's ability to uptake iodine, which in turn alters proper thyroid function and causes disease. Interestingly, this is exactly what toxic fluoride, which is added to most U.S. drinking water supplies, does, yet the EPA has remained silent on this issue.
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Popular infant juices loaded with toxic fluoride
naturalnews.com - 2-5-11
A study to be presented at the March 17, 2011, annual meeting of the International Association for Dental Research in San Diego reveals that infant fruit juices of all types contain toxic fluoride, and many contain levels that far exceed federal guidelines. Infants and children that drink such juices are also exposed to high levels of fluoride in drinking water, food products, toothpaste, and various other sources, which is triggering dental fluorosis, hormone disruption, thyroid problems, brain degradation, and other illnesses. Consequently, many experts are urging an immediate end to artificial fluoridation.
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Boosting Body's Immune Response May Hold Key to HIV Cure
sciencedaily.com - 2-5-11
Australian scientists have successfully cleared a HIV-like infection from mice by boosting the function of cells vital to the immune response.
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Hallucinogens Legally Sold as 'Bath Salts' a New Threat
healthday.com - 2-5-11
An influx of highly hallucinogenic, potentially lethal but -- in most states -- fully legal drugs sold as "bath salts" has law enforcement and drug abuse experts very concerned.
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Obesity Has Nearly Doubled Worldwide Since 1980: Report
healthday.com - 2-5-11
New research shows that obesity is on the rise worldwide -- it's doubled since 1980 -- but people in the wealthiest nations are managing to reduce their blood pressure and cholesterol levels.
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FDA Approves First Drug to Prevent Premature Births
healthday.com - 2-5-11
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first drug to help prevent premature birth in women who have had at least one previous preterm delivery.
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Ayurvedic meds face EU ban
indiatimes.com - 2-4-11
A ban on the sale of Ayurvedic and other herbal medicines will take effect across Europe from May 1 following a European Union directive introduced as a response to concern over adverse effects of such alternative medicines.
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Feds to Oakland: Pot farms would break US law
ajc.com - 2-4-11
The top federal prosecutor in Northern California has warned Oakland officials that large-scale marijuana farms licensed by the city would violate U.S. law and could lead to a crackdown on growers and their backers.
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Coffee, Energy Drinkers Beware: Many Mega-Sized Drinks Loaded With Sugar, Nutrition Expert Says
sciencedaily.com - 2-4-11
Starbucks recently announced a new-sized 31-ounce drink, the "Trenta," which will be in stores this spring. The mega-sized coffee joins the ranks of other energy drinks that can pack plenty of caffeine and calories. Ellen Schuster, a University of Missouri nutrition expert, says that Americans should be wary of extra calories and sugar in the quest for bigger, bolder drinks.
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Will there be a chocolate drought? World's supply of sustainable cocoa could run out by 2014
dailymail.co.uk - 2-4-11
The world faces a chocolate 'drought' over the next few years, an expert warned yesterday.
Political unrest in the Ivory Coast, where 40 per cent of the world's cocoa beans are grown, has 'significantly' depleted the number of certified fair trade cocoa farmers.
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Oysters disappearing worldwide: study
breitbart.com - 2-4-11
A survey of oyster habitats around the world has found that the succulent mollusks are disappearing fast and 85 percent of their reefs have been lost due to disease and over-harvesting.
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Sick Brains in Teens - Is There A Root Cause?
naturalnews.com - 2-4-11
It's been nearly a month since the nation's attention was focused on Tucson, where five were killed and 13 injured , including Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, several other shootings missed the mainstream news. Violence seems to be erupting among youths everywhere, from Los Angeles(1) to Omaha(2) to Brooklyn(3) - indicating something is seriously going wrong in the minds of young persons in this country.
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Avastin increases fatal side effects in cancer patients, study shows
usatoday.com - 2-4-11
Avastin, a blockbuster drug with more than $5.5 billion in global sales, increases the rate of fatal side effects by almost 50% when added to traditional chemotherapy, compared with chemo alone.
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Obesity affects one in 10 adults around the world
bbc.co.uk - 2-4-11
One in 10 of the world's adults is obese, according to a joint UK-US study published in The Lancet.
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Healthier Lifestyles May Prevent 340,000 U.S. Cancers a Year: Study
healthday.com - 2-4-11
About 340,000 cancer cases in the United States could be prevented each year if more Americans ate a healthy diet, got regular exercise and limited their alcohol intake, according to the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF).
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Restrictive Diet May Reduce ADHD Symptoms
healthday.com - 2-4-11
A special restrictive diet may significantly reduce symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in young children, a new study suggests.
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Cold Viruses Appear Linked to Type 1 Diabetes
healthday.com - 2-4-11
While the causes of type 1 diabetes aren't known for certain, a new analysis backs the possibility that cold-like viruses might trigger the disease.
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Parkinson's Disease Genes Found
healthrelatedinfos.com - 2-3-11
A break through in Parkinson's disease has been made by scientists according to a study that was published this Wednesday in the medical journal Lancet.
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Do you need 'Blackberry Botox'? How squinting at smartphones causes premature wrinkles
dailymail.co.uk - 2-3-11
Women heading into middle-age may find themselves self-consciously checking their faces for signs of frown lines and crows feet.
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'Holy grail' of burn surgery: Damaged skin could be healed 'within days' using revolutionary stem cell gun
dailymail.co.uk - 2-3-11
A revolutionary spray gun which uses stem cells to heal severe burns in a matter of days has been developed.
Doctor Jörg Gerlach, of the University of Pittsburgh's McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, has created a method which regenerates healthy skin stem cells from the victim and sprays it on the burned skin.
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Human blood vessels grown in the laboratory
telegraph.co.uk - 2-3-11
Researchers have come up with a way of growing new human veins in the laboratory that can be stored for up to a year and safely transplanted into any patient.
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How hugs can make you feel better
telegraph.co.uk - 2-3-11
Stroking, hugging and touching have been associated with many health giving properties from reducing stress, to pain relief, to maintaining relationships.
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Are MMR vaccines dangerous for children? Dr Suzanne Humphries urges parents to get informed
naturalnews.com - 2-3-11
Are routine vaccines dangerous for children? Dr Suzanne Humphries, a practicing nephrologist (kidney physician) says the vaccine industry isn't giving people both sides of the story, and parents need to get informed before subjecting their children to vaccines that can potentially cause serious harm or even death.
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High blood pressure, obesity linked to memory loss in elderly
usatoday.com - 2-3-11
Older people who have larger waistlines, high blood pressure and other risk factors associated with a condition doctors call "metabolic syndrome" may be at higher risk of memory problems, a new study suggests.
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Cell Reprogramming Leaves a 'Footprint' Behind
sciencedaily.com - 2-3-11
Reprogramming adult cells to recapture their youthful "can-do-it-all" attitude appears to leave an indelible mark, found researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. When the team, led by Joseph Ecker, PhD., a professor in the Genomic Analysis Laboratory, scoured the epigenomes of so-called induced pluripotent stem cells base by base, they found a consistent pattern of reprogramming errors.
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Electrical Stimulation of the Brain May Spark Insight
healthday.com - 2-3-11
Electrical stimulation of the brain can bring a flash of insight that can help people solve new, difficult problems, research suggests.
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Gardasil Vaccine Guards Against HPV in Boys
healthday.com - 2-3-11
A large international trial finds that the Gardasil vaccine shields young men from human papillomavirus (HPV) as well as it protects young women.
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Bedbug crisis not abating, specialists warn
cnn.com - 2-3-11
The average female bedbug can produce up to 400,000 offspring in her lifetime.
And most bedbugs can survive up to a year between feedings.
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Bacteria in the Gut May Influence Brain Development
sciencedaily.com - 2-3-11
A team of scientists from around the globe have found that gut bacteria may influence mammalian brain development and adult behavior. The study is published in the scientific journal PNAS, and is the result of an ongoing collaboration between scientists at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the Genome Institute of Singapore.
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Look-and-Sound-Alike Names Account for Many Painkiller Prescription Errors
healthday.com - 2-3-11
Confusion caused by look-alike and sound-alike names contributes to a large number of the painkiller prescription errors that occur in hospitals, U.S. researchers report.
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Half of Adults Have Hypertension or High Cholesterol: CDC
healthday.com - 2-3-11
Despite some improvements, far too many Americans have out-of-control blood pressure and cholesterol levels -- both primary risk factors for heart disease, federal health officials warn.
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Understanding Bronchitis
botanical.com - 2-2-11
Bronchitis is a condition in which the tubes that carry air to the lungs become inflamed and irritated. Closely following the inflammation and irritation, the tubes become swollen and start to produce mucus, which makes people cough.
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School Lunches Weigh Heavily in Childhood Obesity
medpagetoday.com - 2-1-11
Obese sixth graders pack on the pounds in much the same manner as their adult counterparts -- too much TV, poor dietary habits, and too little physical activity.
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Alzheimer cluster sparks dream of cure
cnn.com - 2-1-11
It's a cruel disease that strips away a person's identity until they can no longer remember their loved ones or feed themselves. But normally, Alzheimer's does not attack until old age.
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Boys pass flu on to boys and girls to girls
telegraph.co.uk - 2-1-11
Research into how the virus was passed around a primary school showed transmission rates from boy-to-boy and from girl-to-girl were three times higher than between the sexes.
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Brisk Walks May Boost Memory in Older Adults
healthday.com - 2-1-11
Older adults who took a brisk walk three times a week did better on memory tests and increased the size of their hippocampus, a portion of the brain involved with memory formation, researchers report.
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Most X-Rays, Scans Unnecessary for Acute Low Back Pain
healthday.com - 2-1-11
X-rays, CT scans and MRIs may be routinely ordered for people with low back pain, but often these tests are unnecessary, suggests new guidance from the American College of Physicians.
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Fla. Federal Judge: Health Reform Law Is Unconstitutional
healthday.com - 2-1-11
A federal judge in Florida ruled Monday that the controversial health-care reform law passed by Congress last spring is unconstitutional because it requires people to purchase health insurance or pay a penalty.
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Trained Labrador Can Sniff Out Colon Cancer, Researchers Say
healthday.com - 2-1-11
With powers of smell far superior to those of humans, dogs can sniff out buried earthquake victims. They can unearth hidden bombs or drugs. They can also apparently detect colorectal cancer, Japanese researchers suggest.
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