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December, 2011 - Herbal and Health News

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Sincere recognition ups worker performance
upi.com - 12-31-11
Sincere, credible recognition is appreciated by employees and can enhance their motivation and performance, U.S. researchers say.
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Synthetic Marijuana Use On The Rise Among U.S. Troops
huffingtonpost.com - 12-31-11
U.S. troops are increasingly using an easy-to-get herbal mix called "Spice," which mimics a marijuana high, is hard to detect and can bring on hallucinations that last for days.
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States That Legalized Medical Marijuana Saw Fewer Traffic Deaths, Study Says
huffingtonpost.com - 12-31-11
A new study has revealed a link between states with legalized medical marijuana and a reduction in traffic-related fatalities. The study was conducted by D. Mark Anderson, a Montana State University economics professor, and Daniel Rees, a professor at the University of Colorado Denver.
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Coast Guard Passenger-Limit Rule Reflects Americans’ Weight Gain
abcnews.go.com - 12-31-11
The average U.S. adult weighs significantly more today than a few decades ago, prompting the U.S. Coast Guard to implement nationwide regulations that could restrict the number of passengers allowed on board a vessel.
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Anorexic at THREE: Hundreds of primary school children being treated for life-threatening eating disorders
dailymail.co.uk - 12-31-11
A child of three is among hundreds of youngsters receiving hospital treatment for eating disorders, a report has revealed.
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Senior moment - or just mulling a response?
msnbc.msn.com - 12-31-11
Seniors may be just as mentally agile as younger people. The reason their thinking appears sluggish is they mull things over longer, a new study shows.
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Double Check Dose Before Giving Acetaminophen To Infants, FDA
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-31-11
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is urging consumers to double check the label on liquid acetaminophen products marketed to infants and children before giving it to them. The popular pain reliever is marketed under various brands, including Tylenol, PediaCare, Triaminic and Little Fevers. There are also store versions and generic brands.
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Obesity-Induced Brain Changes May Be Reason Weight Control Is So Hard
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-31-11
The biggest obstacle to the successful treatment of obesity is the tendency to regain weight lost through diet and exercise, and evidence is increasing that this could be due to physiological causes. Recently, an Australian study reported that after large weight loss, appetite-regulating hormones appear to reset to levels that increase appetite.
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New Clues As To Why Some Older People May Be Losing Their Memory
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-31-11
New research links 'silent strokes,' or small spots of dead brain cells, found in about one out of four older adults to memory loss in the elderly. The study is published in the January 3, 2012, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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Alzheimer's: Diet Patterns May Keep Brain from Shrinking
sciencedaily.com - 12-31-11
People with diets high in several vitamins or in omega 3 fatty acids are less likely to have the brain shrinkage associated with Alzheimer's disease than people whose diets are not high in those nutrients, according to a new study published in the December 28, 2011, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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Chimpanzees seem to know what's on other chimps' minds
guardian.co.uk - 12-31-11
Chimpanzees moving through the forest take into account other chimps' ignorance or knowledge of a threat when they raise the alarm.
The apes were more likely to make warning calls when they spotted a venomous snake if others in their troop had not seen the danger, researchers found. As chimps in the know arrived at the scene, they passed the warning on to others who lagged behind but were still within earshot.
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Antidepressant use in England soars
guardian.co.uk - 12-31-11
The use of antidepressants has risen by more than a quarter in England in just three years, amid fears that more people are suffering from depression due to the economic crisis.
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The billion-dollar pest: U.S. beetle is developing resistance to one of the most widely used genetically modified crops, say scientists
dailymail.co.uk - 12-31-11
Crop pests appear to have developed resistance to an insect toxin inserted into GM corn plants.
As a result, these ‘superbugs’ are surviving efforts by farmers to kill them and so are damaging food crops on farms in the U.S.
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Government to government plan to seize control of all foods
ppjg.wordpress.com - 12-31-11
Shortly after “Dirty Harry” Reid passed the fake food safety bill in here in the US, with his one unanimous vote, C-36 passed two weeks later in Canada. Both bills were an outright attack on individual rights and property rights as both governments claim they now have the authority to unilaterally decide who can grow, process and sell foods and under what conditions. And, just as here in the US, those lawmakers responsible for this attack on liberty claimed they did so because that was what the public demanded and was begging for.
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Apes can gamble, just like humans - and they're actually good at it
dailymail.co.uk - 12-30-11
Apes can 'gamble', just like human beings, a new study suggests.
What's more, our evolutionary cousins are actually quite good at assessing the odds before taking the plunge.
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Survey: Americans want to live to be 90
upi.com - 12-30-11
Each generation appears to disagree on what exactly "old" is, but all want to live until age 90, a U.S. survey indicates.
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Colorado becomes third state to ask DEA to reclassify pot
msnbc.msn.com - 12-30-11
Colorado has become the third state to ask the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to reclassify marijuana in a way that allows doctors to prescribe it as a medical treatment.
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You Say ‘Durezol,’ I Say ‘Duresal’ — FDA Warns of Drug Mix-Ups
abcnews.go.com - 12-30-11
If you want the prescription eye drops called Durezol, make sure your pharmacist doesn’t hand you a bottle of the salicylic acid-containing wart remedy Duresal.
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Fungus found in sinks can cause serious infections
usatoday.com - 12-30-11
Disease-causing strains of the fungus Fusarium are present in bathroom sink drains, which may be a common source of infection in humans, according to a new study.
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Want to avoid mosquito bites? Smelly feet attract the blood-sucking insects to humans
dailymail.co.uk - 12-30-11
If you're travelling to a country affected by malaria be sure to keep your feet clean.
Mosquitoes that spread the deadly disease are attracted to people whose feet are heavily covered with certain kinds of bacteria, scientists have discovered.
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Why do mosquitoes love you? It's your microbes
msnbc.msn.com - 12-30-11
Mosquitoes like some people better than others, and differences in the microbes living on our skin may help explain the bloodsuckers' dining preferences.
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Columbus Brought Syphilis Back From The New World
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-30-11
According to an article published in the current Yearbook of Physical Anthropology, new research is showing that the origin of Syphilis can be traced definitively back to Columbus crew. It appears that European skeletons thought to show evidence of the disease prior to 1492, when Columbus set sail, are misleading and that the disease did not exist prior to the explorer's return.
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Pigeons Can "Count" As Well As Monkeys
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-30-11
Although many species, from bees to elephants can distinguish among stimuli of varying quantities, apart from humans, only primates such as lemurs and chimps, were thought to have the ability to employ abstract numerical rules and reason numerically. However, according to a short research report published online in the journal Science on 23 December, researchers have discovered that pigeons can count as well as monkeys, and they suggest the ability is more widespread in the animal kingdom than we might assume.
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Hand-Washing Key to Stopping Spread of Disease
healthday.com - 12-30-11
There are many ways to prevent spreading germs and disease, but experts say one of the easiest ways is also one of the most important: proper hand-washing.
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Are Global Market Forces Linked to Obesity Epidemic?
healthday.com - 12-30-11
Nations with open trade policies have greater densities of fast food restaurants and higher rates of obesity than those with more trade controls, a new study has found.
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Music May Help Ease Pain for Anxious People
healthday.com - 12-30-11
Concentrating on music can provide enough distraction to ease the pain of people with significant anxiety, according to a new study.
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Crowded ERs may leave kids in pain
upi.com - 12-30-11
Crowding in U.S. emergency rooms prevents some children with acute long bone fractures from being treated for pain in a timely way, researchers say.
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Hospitals refuse to see irradiated patients
fukushima-diary.com - 12-30-11
In Japan, some of the (most of the) hospitals refuse to see patients who are sick from radiation.
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Medical Journal Article: 14,000 U.S. Deaths Tied to Fukushima Reactor Disaster Fallout
theintelhub.com - 12-30-11
An estimated 14,000 excess deaths in the United States are linked to the radioactive fallout from the disaster at the Fukushima nuclear reactors in Japan, according to a major new article in the December 2011 edition of the International Journal of Health Services.
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Schizophrenic subjects' cells wound tight
upi.com - 12-30-11
A discovery that DNA stays too tightly wound in certain brain cells of schizophrenic subjects offers promise of more effective treatment, U.S. researchers said.
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'Silent strokes' linked to memory loss
upi.com - 12-30-11
About 1-in-4 older adults with memory loss has had a so-called silent stroke -- a small spot of dead brain cells, U.S. researchers said.
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Celiac ups depression risk for women
upi.com - 12-30-11
Women with celiac disease, a disorder linked to a reaction to eating gluten, have an elevated depression risk even on a gluten-free diet, U.S. researchers say.
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Study: Diabetes rarely sole health issue
upi.com - 12-29-11
Britons diagnosed with diabetes are more likely than those who do not have diabetes to report other chronic conditions, a survey indicates.
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Elderly brains stay sharp after low trans-fat life
msnbc.msn.com - 12-29-11
Older people with high levels of omega-3 fatty acids and vitamins B, C, D, and E in their blood do better on cognitive tests than those with lower levels, according to a new study.
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MRI Scans Better For Suspected Heart Disease Patients
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-29-11
In recent years, imaging techniques such as the most commonly used single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), have gradually replaced exercise treadmill tests for diagnosing heart disease. Now a five-year trial of over 750 heart disease patients conducted by the University of Leeds in the UK suggests that a more modern scanning method based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is better for diagnosing coronary heart disease than SPECT and should be more widely adopted.
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Regaining Weight Bad For The Health
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-29-11
Recent research has shown that even after dieting and losing weight, the body tends to try its best to regain the lost fat stores. Holiday times tend to be tough for those trying to stay trim, and New Year resolutions often don't stick.
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The risks of anti-aging medicine
cnn.com - 12-29-11
Hanneke Hops wasn't afraid of dying. What concerned her was growing old and not being able to run marathons, ride horses, or fly planes. So the 56-year-old Hayward, California, woman turned to Alan Mintz, M.D. -- a radiologist who founded the Cenegenics Medical Institute in Las Vegas, which specializes in "age management medicine."
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'Hair of the dog' makes hangover worse
upi.com - 12-29-11
The so-called hair of the dog -- the notion that having a drink can relieve a hangover -- only makes a hangover worse, a U.S. family physician advises.
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Cases of Tamiflu-Resistant Flu Concern Experts
healthday.com - 12-29-11
World Health Organization researchers are reporting an apparent spike in Australia in the number of seasonal influenza cases resistant to Tamiflu, the most commonly used antiviral drug.
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Vitamins, Omega-3s May Keep Brain From Shrinking: Study
healthday.com - 12-29-11
Older adults with high levels of omega-3 fatty acids and vitamins B, C, D and E in their blood performed better on certain measures of thinking abilities, and also tended to have larger brain volume, a new study finds.
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Know the Signs of Alzheimer's
healthday.com - 12-29-11
Knowing the warning signs of Alzheimer's disease is important because it may lead to an early diagnosis, experts say.
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Self-Regulation of the Immune System Suppresses Defense Against Cancer
sciencedaily.com - 12-29-11
Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which are part of the body's immune system, downregulate the activity of other immune cells, thus preventing the development of autoimmune diseases or allergies. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now found the activation steps that are blocked by Tregs in immune cells. Since Tregs can also suppress the body's immune defense against cancer, the findings obtained by the DKFZ researchers are important for developing more efficient cancer treatments.
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Childhood Hypersensitivity Linked to OCD
sciencedaily.com - 12-29-11
In childhood, rituals like regular schedules for meal, bath, and bed times are a healthy part of behavioral development. But combined with oral and tactile sensitivities, such as discomfort at the dentist or irritation caused by specific fabrics, these rituals could be an early warning sign of adult Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD).
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Turn Down the iPod to Save Your Hearing
sciencedaily.com - 12-29-11
Today's ubiquitous MP3 players permit users to listen to crystal-clear tunes at high volume for hours on end -- a marked improvement on the days of the Walkman. But according to Tel Aviv University research, these advances have also turned personal listening devices into a serious health hazard, with teenagers as the most at-risk group.
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Children recall memories back to age 2
upi.com - 12-29-11
Events experienced by children as young as age 2 can be recalled later, researchers in New Zealand found.
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Injected meth linked to suicide attempts
upi.com - 12-29-11
Drug users who inject methamphetamine had an 80 percent greater risk of attempting suicide than users of other drugs, U.S. and Canadian researchers say.
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Fish oil substance cures leukemia in mice
upi.com - 12-29-11
A compound produced from fish oil that appears to target leukemia stem cells could lead to a cure for the cancer, U.S. researchers say.
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All should prepare for cold, power outage
upi.com - 12-29-11
With colder temperatures approaching, U.S. health officials suggest everyone prepare their homes in case of severe cold temperatures or power outages.
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As gastric banding increases, so may complications
dailymail.co.uk - 12-28-11
Use of gastric bands as a weight-loss aid is increasing, and doctors need to be alert for potential complications years later, say the authors of a new case report.
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dailymail.co.uk - 12-28-11

dailymail.co.uk - 12-28-11
Could a popular anti-ageing supplement bought off the internet really be as good as HRT?
That was the suggestion last week after a study by the University of Pisa, Italy, found that DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone) is as effective as Hormone Replacement Therapy at managing menopausal symptoms, including hot flushes — while also increasing women’s enjoyment of sex.
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Cancer patients 'rely on charity hand-outs' as they struggle to pay for fuel bills
dailymail.co.uk - 12-28-11
Cancer patients are being forced to rely on charity handouts as they struggle to pay for rising fuel bills, says a report.
Findings highlighted that 70 per cent of those aged under 55 lose income after being diagnosed with the disease, often because they are too ill to work.
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Parental Smoking Causes Vascular Damage In Young Children
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-28-11
Another wave of evidence against tobacco use was released this week, with evidence from a Dutch research team showing parents smoking causing vascular damage in young children.
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New Cotton Fabric Cleans Itself When Exposed To Ordinary Sunlight
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-28-11
Imagine jeans, sweats or socks that clean and de-odorize themselves when hung on a clothesline in the sun or draped on a balcony railing. Scientists are reporting development of a new cotton fabric that does clean itself of stains and bacteria when exposed to ordinary sunlight. Their report appears in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.
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Experts: Allergy tests no 'magic bullet'
upi.com - 12-28-11
Allergy tests are not "magic bullets" and doctors should avoid making a diagnosis based solely on these type of test results, U.S. researchers say.
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New Blood Test May Rule Out Heart Attacks More Quickly
healthday.com - 12-28-11
A new test measuring levels of troponin I in the blood may help determine whether someone is really having a heart attack earlier than is currently possible.
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Racial Disparities Seem to Persist in Depression Diagnosis
healthday.com - 12-28-11
Racial and cultural factors still affect the diagnosis and treatment of depression in elderly Americans, despite improvements to diagnostic tools and therapies in recent decades, according to a new study.
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The New Face of Pet Therapy
healthday.com - 12-28-11
No doubt about it. People have a deep and complex relationship with animals, which elicit a wide range of emotional responses by their very presence and interactions with human beings.
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Viagra Against Heart Failure: Researchers Throw Light On the Mechanism
sciencedaily.com - 12-28-11
How sildenafil, the active ingredient in Viagra, can alleviate heart problems is reported by Bochum's researchers in cooperation with colleagues from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester (Minnesota) in the journal Circulation. They studied dogs with diastolic heart failure, a condition in which the heart chamber does not sufficiently fill with blood. The scientists showed that sildenafil makes stiffened cardiac walls more elastic again. The drug activates an enzyme that causes the giant protein titin in the myocardial cells to relax.
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HIV therapy is named breakthrough of year
upi.com - 12-28-11
The journal Science has named the finding that treatment with anti-retroviral drugs prevents the spread of the AIDS virus its Breakthrough of the Year.
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Absenteeism linked to mental issues
upi.com - 12-28-11
Children who miss a lot of school are more likely than others to have psychiatric problems, a team of U.S. researchers found.
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Some climbers getting mountain sickness
upi.com - 12-28-11
More tourists are climbing mountains of more than 5,000 feet and the lack of acclimatization is causing acute mountain sickness, German researchers say.
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Yoav Medan: Ultrasound surgery -- healing without cuts - Video (16:13)
TED.com - 12-27-11
Imagine having a surgery with no knives involved. At TEDMED, Yoav Medan shares a technique that uses MRI to find trouble spots and focused ultrasound to treat such issues as brain lesions, uterine fibroids and several kinds of cancerous growths.
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Fish, oil relieve pancreatitis symptoms
upi.com - 12-27-11
Substances found in virgin olive oil and fish relieve the symptoms of pancreatitis, researchers in Spain said.
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Caffeine Mist Is a ‘Club Drug,’ Says Schumer
abcnews.go.com - 12-27-11
A caffeine mist marketed as “breathable energy” may become a health hazard for teens and young people, according to doctors and Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y. On Thursday, Schumer asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to review the product’s safety.
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Vaccine could halt autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and Chrohn's
dailymail.co.uk - 12-27-11
A simple vaccine could stop the onset of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and Chrohn's, say scientists.
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Traditional allergy tests can lead to misdiagnosis
dailymail.co.uk - 12-27-11
Doctors are being warned that blood tests and skin-prick testing are not reliable ways of detecting allergies.
Scientists discovered an over-reliance on traditional allergy tests can lead to a misdiagnosis and ill-advised cautionary measures.
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New powerful painkiller has abuse experts worried
msnbc.msn.com - 12-27-11
Drug companies are working to develop a pure, more powerful version of a highly abused medicine, which has addiction experts worried that it could spur a new wave of abuse.
The new pills contain the highly addictive painkiller hydrocodone, packing up to 10 times the amount of the drug as existing medications such as Vicodin. Four companies have begun patient testing, and one of them — Zogenix of San Diego — plans to apply early next year to begin marketing its product, Zohydro.
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Mentally ill flood ERs as states cut services
msnbc.msn.com - 12-27-11
On a recent shift at a Chicago emergency department, Dr. William Sullivan treated a newly homeless patient who was threatening to kill himself.
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The Ability To Love Takes Root In Earliest Infancy
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-27-11
The ability to trust, love, and resolve conflict with loved ones starts in childhood - way earlier than you may think. That is one message of a new review of the literature in Current Directions in Psychological Science, a journal published by the Association for Psychological Science. "Your interpersonal experiences with your mother during the first 12 to 18 months of life predict your behavior in romantic relationships 20 years later," says psychologist Jeffry A. Simpson, the author, with University of Minnesota colleagues W. Andrew Collins and Jessica E. Salvatore. "Before you can remember, before you have language to describe it, and in ways you aren't aware of, implicit attitudes get encoded into the mind," about how you'll be treated or how worthy you are of love and affection.
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Rheumatoid Joint Disease - Mindfulness Exercises Help Significantly
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-27-11
A small study published online in the Annals of Rheumatic Diseases reveals that "Mindfulness" exercises, irrespective of how difficult they are, that focus on experiencing the present moment can help to limit the stress and fatigue linked to painful rheumatoid joint disease.
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Terrorists Who Use Nerve Gas And Other Agents Could Be Tracked Down Using New Test
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-27-11
Scientists are reporting development of a first-of-its-kind technology that could help law enforcement officials trace the residues from terrorist attacks involving nerve gas and other chemical agents back to the companies or other sources where the perpetrators obtained ingredients for the agent. A report on the technique, which could eventually help track down perpetrators of chemical attacks, appears in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry.
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Orange Juice Squeezed In Bars And Restaurants Often Contaminated With Microbes
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-27-11
Scientists from the University of Valencia in Spain have analysed fresh orange juice squeezed by machines in catering establishments. They have confirmed that 43% of samples exceeded the acceptable enterobacteriaceae levels laid down by legislation. The researchers recommend that oranges are handled correctly, that juicers are washed properly and that the orange juice is served immediately rather than being stored in metal jugs.
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More Schooling Might Raise IQ
healthday.com - 12-27-11
Children who have more schooling may see their IQ improve, Norwegian researchers have found.
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Mother-Toddler Bond May Influence Teen Obesity
healthday.com - 12-27-11
Teens are more likely to be obese if they had a poor emotional relationship with their mother when they were toddlers, according to a new study.
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New Sensor to Detect Lung Cancer from Exhaled Breath
sciencedaily.com - 12-27-11
Tecnalia, through the Interreg project Medisen, is contributing to develop biosensors capable of detecting the presence of tumour markers of lung cancer in exhaled breath. This is possible because of the changes produced within the organism of an ill person, changes reflected in the exhaled breath of the patient and which enable determining the presence of this type of marker during the initial stages of the disease.
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'Rare' Brain Disorder May Be More Common Than Thought, Scientists Say
sciencedaily.com - 12-27-11
A global team of neuroscientists, led by researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida, has found the gene responsible for a brain disorder that may be much more common than once believed. In the Dec. 25 online issue of Nature Genetics, the researchers say they identified 14 different mutations in the gene CSF1R that lead to development of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS). This is a devastating disorder of the brain's white matter that leads to death between ages 40 and 60. People who inherit the abnormal gene always develop HDLS. Until now, a definite diagnosis of HDLS required examination of brain tissue at biopsy or autopsy.
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New Way to Assess Risk from Chemicals
sciencedaily.com - 12-27-11
Approximately 80,000 industrial chemicals are in use and about 700 new chemicals are introduced to commerce each year in the United States, according to the U.S. Government Accountability Office. To assess human health risks from exposure to harmful substances, James Englehardt, professor in the College of Engineering at the University of Miami, is proposing a new technique that is more efficient than current methods.
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U.S. veterans to be screened for obesity
upi.com - 12-27-11
The Veterans Health Administration issued a policy directing a weight-management program to help reduce obesity rates among veterans, officials say.
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Kids understand positive thinking benefits
upi.com - 12-27-11
Kindergartners -- or children as young as age 5 -- know thinking positively can make them feel better, U.S. researchers say.
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ERs fill with intoxicated at year's end
upi.com - 12-27-11
At the end of the year, U.S. hospital emergency rooms fill due to binge alcohol consumption of adults of all ages, a San Francisco physician says.
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Study: Some veterans reluctant to use VA
upi.com - 12-27-11
The Department of Veterans Affairs is the largest healthcare provider to U.S. veterans, but many are reluctant to use its services, researchers say.
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Jury Refuses to Convict Anyone for Marijuana Possession! - Video 3:45
freedomsphoenix.com - 12-27-11
What happens when a judge can't find any potential jurors willing to convict people on drug charges? We find out in Montana.
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Tips offered for using combustible heaters
upi.com - 12-26-11
With winter here, U.S. government officials remind those heating with wood stoves, fireplaces or space heaters to follow manufacturer's instructions.
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Survey: Germans eating less healthily
upi.com - 12-26-11
Germans are eating fewer servings of fruits and vegetables than they were last March, a survey indicates.
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Therapy dogs help Minn. girl to walk again
upi.com - 12-26-11
A U.S. girl with a rare neurological disease couldn't lift her head off her pillow, but a pet therapy dog got her on the road to recovery, therapists say.
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Interpol issues arrest warrant for boss of faulty breast implant company
telegraph.co.uk - 12-26-11
Interpol is seeking the arrest of the boss of a French company whose breast implants are at the centre of an international health scare.
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Coronary stenting: how does it work?
telegraph.co.uk - 12-26-11
The technique, a type of procedure known as angioplasty, is used to treat coronary heart disease or angina where the blockage or narrowing of arteries prevents enough blood from reaching the heart and risks damaging the muscle.
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Seafood 10,000 Times Over Safe Limit for Carcinogenic Contamination, FDA Says to Eat it Anyway
naturalsociety.com - 12-26-11
Despite seafood showing extremely high levels of contamination, the FDA still deems the food safe for consumption. The FDA not only falsely softened the risk of seafood consumption due to carcinogenic contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the seafood supply, but also ignored individual FDA staff members who called for higher levels of contamination protection.
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How Bacteria Build Homes Inside Healthy Cells
sciencedaily.com - 12-25-11
Bacteria are able to build camouflaged homes for themselves inside healthy cells -- and cause disease -- by manipulating a natural cellular process.
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Bracelets made from deadly seeds recalled
telegraph.co.uk - 12-25-11
The Eden Project in Cornwall is one of 36 retailers urging customers to return the red and black bracelets made from the Jequirity bean, the deadly seed of the plant abrus precatorious.
It contains the toxin abrin, a controlled substance under the Terrorism Act that if swallowed can kill in doses of just 3 micrograms. It is related to ricin, the chemical warfare agent.
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Twelve Swine Flu Cases Reported In Five States, Says CDC, USA
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-25-11
The CDC informs that it has received twelve reports of humans infected with swine flu - A(H3N2) virus. Reported cases have come in from West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maine, Iowa, and Indiana. Eleven of them were children. Half of all the cases had not been exposed to swine, the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) adds. All patients have made a full recovery; three had to be admitted to hospital.
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Gastric Band Complications
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-25-11
As more and more people opt for gastric band surgery to lose weight, the more people will experience complications linked to the procedure. In a case report published Online First in The Lancet, Dr. Adam Czapran at the Department of Respiratory Medicine and Coronary Care Unit at Russells Hall Hospital in Dudley, West Midlands, UK, and his team describe a 49-year old woman's ordeal several years after she had gastric band surgery.
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Arguments while driving can ruin Christmas
upi.com - 12-25-11
Forty-two percent of people in Britain say arguments inside automobiles have ruined their Christmas, a survey indicates.
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How to Survive the Holiday Eating Season
healthday.com - 12-25-11
Lots of folks don't think about what they eat over the holiday season until January, when they stare sadly at the number on the scale and then trudge off to hit the gym, join Weight Watchers or pick up the latest fad diet book.
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The Champion of Painkillers
commondreams.org - 12-25-11
The news about narcotic painkillers is increasingly dire: Overdoses now kill nearly 15,000 people a year -- more than heroin and cocaine combined. In some states, the painkiller death toll exceeds that of car crashes.
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Virgin Olive Oil & Fish Fatty Acids Help Prevent Acute Pancreatitis
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-24-11
Oleic acid and hydroxytyrosol present in a particularly high concentration in virgin olive oil and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids found in fish affect the cellular mechanisms involved in the development of acute pancreatitis, a disease of oxidative-inflammatory etiology. Therefore, oleic acid and hydroxytyrosol can be considered potential functional ingredients, as they may prevent or mitigate this disease.
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Botox Shows Lasting Effects On Distant Muscles
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-24-11
Botulinum neurotoxin type A better known as Botox has previously unsuspected 'systemic' effects on muscles other than the ones it's injected into, reports a study in the January issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, official journal of the International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS).
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Wal-Mart pulls infant formula after baby's death
usatoday.com - 12-24-11
After one Missouri baby died and another one in Illinois was stricken with a rare infection, officials in Missouri are testing infant formula to see if there might be a link between the cases.
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Surprise as scientists find Viagra makes heart relax
telegraph.co.uk - 12-24-11
Viagra helps ailing hearts to recover in a surprising way - by making them less stiff, scientists have learned.
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Binge Eating And Depression Often Linked In Teenage Girls
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-24-11
After carrying out a US-wide study, researchers report that depressed adolescent girls are two times more likely to begin binge eating as girls who are not depressed. In addition, girls who regularly binge-eat are twice as likely to develop symptoms of depression. The findings indicate that adolescent girls who show signs of either binge-eating or depression should be screened for both disorders. The study appears in the current issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health.
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Acid Reflux 50% More Common
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-24-11
A long-term Norwegian study reveals the number of people who experience acid reflux at least once a week has gone up by nearly 50% in the last 10 years, with women appearing to be more susceptible to the condition than men. The findings raise concerns that this will lead to an increase in cancer of the oesophagus, a once rare but now more common malignancy that is very difficult to treat. The researchers write about their findings in the online first issue of the journal Gut, published on 21 December.
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FDA Issues Warning On Infant Tylenol / Paracetamol
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-24-11
It's always advisable to read the medication label thoroughly before taking any drug and doubly so when administering a dose to a young child. With that in mind the FDA has issued a warning in regards to liquid acetaminophen marketed for children.
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Overweight 7-Year-Olds Face Higher Risk of Asthma
healthday.com - 12-24-11
Children who are overweight or obese during early childhood have a greater risk of having asthma at age 8 than normal-weight kids, a new study finds.
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Multiple Sclerosis Linked to Different Area of Brain
sciencedaily.com - 12-24-11
Radiology researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have found evidence that multiple sclerosis affects an area of the brain that controls cognitive, sensory and motor functioning apart from the disabling damage caused by the disease's visible lesions.
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Crucial Advances in 'Brain Reading' Demonstrated
sciencedaily.com - 12-24-11
At UCLA's Laboratory of Integrative Neuroimaging Technology, researchers use functional MRI brain scans to observe brain signal changes that take place during mental activity. They then employ computerized machine learning (ML) methods to study these patterns and identify the cognitive state -- or sometimes the thought process -- of human subjects. The technique is called "brain reading" or "brain decoding."
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Possible Cure for Leukemia Found in Fish Oil
sciencedaily.com - 12-24-11
A compound produced from fish oil that appears to target leukemia stem cells could lead to a cure for the disease, according to Penn State researchers.
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Brain implants 'switch off' Tourette's
upi.com - 12-24-11
A British Tourette's syndrome sufferer has had her symptoms "switched off" in a revolutionary procedure involving brain implants, doctors said.
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Scared of the dentist? New painless cavity drill could be on the market in two years
dailymail.co.uk - 12-23-11
There could yet be hope for those who live in fear of getting a filling, as a new painless cavity drill is set to hit dentists' surgeries.
The hi-tech 'plasma brush' can hollow out rotten teeth in just 30 seconds, with only a slight cooling sensation for the patient.
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Hepatitis C transmitted via organs
upi.com - 12-23-11
The transmission of hepatitis C virus by transplanted organs and tissues indicates a different test should be used for screening organs, U.S. officials say.
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Overall happiness in U.S. on the decline
upi.com - 12-23-11
People in the United States, at least those who are on Twitter, appear to be growing unhappier, researchers say.
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Which Wheats Make the Best Whole-Grain Cookie Doughs?
sciencedaily.com - 12-23-11
Festive cookies, served at year-end holiday gatherings, may in the future be made with a larger proportion of whole-grain flour instead of familiar, highly refined white flour. That's a goal of ongoing studies by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists in Wooster, Ohio.
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Resting heart rate predictor of heart risk
upi.com - 12-23-11
A study of 30,000 men and women who had an increase in their resting heart rate over a 10-year period had an increased risk of death, researchers in Norway say.
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How to bring holiday to the hospitalized
upi.com - 12-23-11
It may not be a much of a holiday for those who are hospitalized, but a U.S. psychologist says friends and family can make a difference for the patient.
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Holiday blues may signal depression
usatoday.com - 12-23-11
The holidays can be a particularly difficult time for people suffering from depression.
Experts from Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, part of the Loyola University Health System, said they are bracing for an increase in self-destructive behavior. They noted however, there are ways to recognize when a person is depressed and intervene before they end up in the emergency room.
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Meet the extreme breast-feeders
dailymail.co.uk - 12-23-11
Sarah Hastings came across a problem familiar to many new mothers when her daughter was six months old. Desperate as she was to persuade her baby Zoe to take a bottle instead of being breast-fed so she could get back to work, the little girl refused to do so.
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Breakthrough of the year? AIDS discovery could put virus on the run, bioethicist says
msnbc.msn.com - 12-23-11
A clinical trial involving AIDS this year is rightly being called by Science magazine the most important scientific breakthrough of the year.
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New Approach To Nursing Education Gives Students The Chance To 'Live Like A Nurse'
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-23-11
Since they were pre-teens, Kathrine McKay and Kathryn Lito had aspirations of pursuing a nursing career. So when they applied to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) program at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Nursing, they decided to take an accelerated approach to their education with the new Pacesetters program.
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Rare Deletions Or Duplications Of DNA Tied To Bipolar Disorder
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-23-11
New research led by University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine, finds that rare copy number variants (CNVs) where sections of DNA are either duplicated or missing, seem to play a key role in the risk for early onset bipolar disorder, which appears in childhood or early adulthood. The researchers write about their findings in a paper published online on 22 December in the journal Neuron.
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Most Weight Regained by Older Women Is Fat, Study Finds
healthday.com - 12-23-11
Some weight regain is common after weight loss, but in older women many of those regained pounds return as fat mass rather than muscle mass, according to a new study.
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Chronic School Absenteeism Linked to Mental Health Problems
healthday.com - 12-23-11
Children who miss school often are more likely to have symptoms of mental health problems as teens, a new study finds.
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Brain Size May Predict Risk for Early Alzheimer's Disease
sciencedaily.com - 12-23-11
New research suggests that, in people who don't currently have memory problems, those with smaller regions of the brain's cortex may be more likely to develop symptoms consistent with very early Alzheimer's disease. The study is published in the December 21, 2011, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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U.S. recession: 9 million lost healthcare
upi.com - 12-23-11
Some 9.3 million U.S. adults lost health insurance coverage due to a lost job during the recession of 2007 to 2009, researchers estimate.
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Study: Any toy good if a parent plays too
upi.com - 12-23-11
Some parents prefer to buy educational toys, but children benefit from any toy if their parents play with them and engage them, a U.S. researcher advises.
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Breastfeeding children 'cuts risk of obesity and diabetes in later life'
dailymail.co.uk - 12-22-11
Breastfeeding could help to prevent children developing diabetes and becoming obese later in life, scientists believe.
New research shows that breastfed babies follow a different growth pattern to those who drink formula milk, which is likely to have future health benefits.
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Amy Winehouse and Kurt Cobain may have died aged 27 but its not a doom-laden age for musicians: research
telegraph.co.uk - 12-22-11
Despite a strong of famous musicians who have died at 27 - such as Jim Morrison, Jimi Hendrix, Amy Winehouse and Kurt Cobain - musicians are no more likely to pass away at that age than any other year, researchers found.
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Homeless women 'die by age 43' on average
telegraph.co.uk - 12-22-11
Researchers found people who live rough are likely to die more than 30 years earlier than the average British person.
According to new figures homeless people will die in their 40s - men on average at 47 while women have a life expectancy of 43.
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What makes someone an angry drunk?
msnbc.msn.com - 12-22-11
There are weepy drinkers, inappropriately affectionate drinkers, giggly and goofy drinkers. But there's one type of reveler you really want to avoid: the angry drinker. New research suggests how to spot one.
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Encouraging Loved One To Lose Weight Could Be Best Gift This Christmas
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-22-11
Encouraging an overweight partner or close friend to shed some pounds could be your best gift to them this Christmas. Yet a recent UK poll finds that while most people worry that an excessive waistline might be affecting their loved one's health, a considerable number shy away from raising the matter with them.
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What Are The Signs And Symptoms Of Neuropathy?
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-22-11
The majority of cases of neuropathy, often referred to as peripheral neuropathy, affects the motor and sensory nerves. Patients generally experience initial symptoms on their feet, hands, arms and legs. This is called Sensorimotor Polyneuropathy.
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Morning flu jabs 'work better for men'
bbc.co.uk - 12-22-11
Flu jabs can be made more effective by changing the time of day they are given - mornings for men and afternoons for women are best - scientists believe.
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Expert: Some foods can reduce stress
upi.com - 12-22-11
It's that frazzled time of year, but a U.S. food expert says one way to reduce stress and anxiety is to choose foods with natural calming effects.
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Holiday food can carry bacteria
upi.com - 12-22-11
Health officials in Canada say many foods at holiday parties can carry bacteria that cause illness so food safety precautions are a must.
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Trees that yield frankincense under threat
upi.com - 12-22-11
Frankincense, one of the three gifts of the Magi who visited the baby Jesus, is under threat and may disappear from where it grows in Ethiopia, researchers say.
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Study: Binge drinking is contagious
upi.com - 12-22-11
Binge drinking -- especially among couples -- is as contagious as the common cold, researchers in Canada suggest.
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Pancreatic cancer linked to minerals
upi.com - 12-22-11
People with high levels of the trace elements nickel and selenium may have a reduced risk of developing pancreatic cancer, U.S. and Spanish researchers say.
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As Obesity Rises, More Suffer From Acid Reflux
healthday.com - 12-22-11
As the obesity epidemic spreads around the world more people are suffering from acid reflux, likely increasing the number of those who will develop esophageal cancer, a new study suggests.
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Scientists Probe the Origins of Dyslexia
healthday.com - 12-22-11
Problems in how people with dyslexia process the sounds they hear may be at the heart of this learning disorder, new research suggests.
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Widowers Who Stay Single Might Face More Mental Health Woes
healthday.com - 12-22-11
Widowers who are still single a few years after their wife's death have a significantly increased chance of developing mental health disorders, according to a new study.
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Most Sick or Disabled Seniors Want Docs to Say How Long They Have
healthday.com - 12-22-11
Life expectancy is a topic many disabled seniors want to talk about with their doctors but very few have that discussion, a new study finds.
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Did Beethoven's Hearing Loss Shape His Compositions?
healthday.com - 12-22-11
Ludwig van Beethoven was arguably one of the most influential classical music composers of all time, yet he was deaf by the end of his career.
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The Biology Behind Severe PMS
sciencedaily.com - 12-22-11
Sensitivity to allopregnanolone, a hormone that occurs naturally in the body after ovulation and during pregnancy, changes during the course of the menstrual cycle and is different in women with severe pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) compared with women without PMS complaints.
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CA medical marijuana backers ready ballot measure
mercurynews.com - 12-21-11
Medical marijuana advocates want to create a statewide system for licensing, regulating and taxing the industry as a way of persuading federal officials to ease up on their crackdown of California's pot clubs and growers.
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Eating less 'can boost your brain and help you remember more'
dailymail.co.uk - 12-21-11
Eating less could help you remember more, researchers have found.
Skipping dessert and having an after-dinner coffee instead could also be good for your brain, as well as your waistline.
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Why a mushroom omelette could cut pancreatic cancer risk - selenium and nickel-rich diet has a protective effect
dailymail.co.uk - 12-21-11
High levels of the trace elements selenium and nickel may help cut the risk of deadly pancreatic cancer, according to new research.
The elements, which are found in certain foods, appear to offer a protective effect against the disease.
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Six in ten dementia sufferers not diagnosed
telegraph.co.uk - 12-21-11
The majority of people with the condition have not been diagnosed meaning they are missing out on vital support and treatment, MPs said.
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Knee Pain Common In Older Women
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-21-11
It appears that knee pain of some kind is a common complaint in middle-aged and mature women, with varying possible causes leading to varying types of pain. A new study on knee-pain patterns assessed periodically over 12 years in a representative UK population finds that nearly two-thirds (63%) of women aged 50 and over experience knee pain at least once, persistently, or intermittently over such a period.
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Low Back Pain - Practitioners Recommend Time Off Despite Guidelines
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-21-11
Even though guidelines for clinical management of patients with low back pain (LBP) encourage health care practitioners to advise patients to remain active and return to work, most practitioners feel that work factors can cause or aggravate LBP and often recommend a 'short break from work' to allow healing.
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Alzheimer's - Experimental Drug May Stop Progression
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-21-11
According to findings in a study published in PLoS One, a new drug candidate may be the first drug that is capable of halting the devastating mental decline of Alzheimer's disease. Researchers administered the drug, known as J147, to mice with Alzheimer's disease and observed an associated improvement in memory and prevention in brain damage. The new drug was developed by scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, led by David Schubert, and could be trialled as a treatment for Alzheimer's disease in humans in the near future.
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Early Food Choices Seem to Influence Taste for Salt Later
healthday.com - 12-21-11
The types of foods given to infants seems to affect their future taste for salt, a new study has found.
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Maggots Quickly Clean Up Wounds, Study Shows
healthday.com - 12-21-11
The surgeons' scalpel may have new (and wriggling) competition in cleaning troublesome wounds: maggots.
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Drug Overdoses Kill More Americans Than Car Accidents: CDC
healthday.com - 12-21-11
More Americans now die from drug overdoses than in car accidents, according to a new government report released Tuesday.
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The Role of Internet Pharmacies in Prescription Drug Abuse
sciencedaily.com - 12-21-11
Efforts to halt the growing abuse of prescription drugs must include addressing the availability of these drugs on the Internet and increasing physician awareness of the dangers posed by Internet pharmacies.
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Mediterranean Diet Gives Longer Life, Swedish Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 12-21-11
A Mediterranean diet with large amounts of vegetables and fish gives a longer life. This is the unanimous result of four studies to be published by the Sahlgrenska Academy.
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Scientists Identify an Innate Function of Vitamin E
sciencedaily.com - 12-21-11
It's rubbed on the skin to reduce signs of aging and consumed by athletes to improve endurance but scientists now have the first evidence of one of vitamin E's normal body functions.
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Middle-age BP a predictor of heart attack
upi.com - 12-21-11
A blood pressure increase during middle age greatly raises the risk of having a heart attack or stroke during a person's lifetime, U.S. researchers say.
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Gallup: U.S. diabetes rate up slightly
upi.com - 12-21-11
Eleven percent of Americans said in the third quarter of 2011 they had ever been diagnosed with diabetes, up from 10.6 in the second quarter, a survey says.
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U.S. asks journals to censor bird flu studies
reuters.com - 12-21-11
A U.S. scientific advisory board on Tuesday asked two scientific journals to leave out data from research studies on a lab-made version of bird flu that could spread more easily to humans, fearing it could be used as a potential weapon.
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An unjolly Christmas may be deadlyAn unjolly Christmas may be deadly
upi.com - 12-20-11
For those who have no support system, no friends, family, loved ones or even co-workers, the holidays can prove deadly, a U.S. emergency room physician says.
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Larger Waistlines Mean Smaller Capacity For Commercial Water Transit
cbslocal.com - 12-20-11
The United States Coast Guard has scaled back the maximum number of passengers allowed on a given ferry, resulting in a lower maximum capacity rate for commercial vessels such as the Savannah Belles Ferry.
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Blink patterns may be a window into autistic mind
usatoday.com - 12-20-11
Toddlers with autism show different blink patterns than other children, a finding that researchers say may provide a clue to the way people with autism process what they see.
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Has your child got Pathological Demand Avoidance Syndrome? New condition 'makes children unable to cope with ANY demand'
dailymail.co.uk - 12-20-11
All parents will be familiar with the frustration of trying to pacify a disobedient toddler from time to time.
However, doctors have discovered some children have a condition which means they are unable to cope with any sort of demand.
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Do you really want to know what your doc is writing about you?
msnbc.msn.com - 12-20-11
Have you ever been tempted to sneak a peek at those notes your doctor is scribbling about you? If you have, you’re like most patients, new Harvard research shows.
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Compulsive shopping: When spending is like substance abuse
cnn.com - 12-20-11
The purse was by designer Baby Phat, and it was only $5. But when Elizabeth Deiter bought it at the thrift store where she works, she immediately had to run over to the bank and deposit money to avoid running a negative balance.
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Cancer survivors have higher risk of melanoma
cnn.com - 12-20-11
Doctors have long known that people who survive one melanoma have a markedly higher risk of developing another of these aggressive skin cancers. Now, for the first time, a study has found that survivors of non-skin cancers also may have an increased risk of melanoma.
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Sun 'stops chickenpox spreading'
bbc.co.uk - 12-20-11
Exposure to sunlight may help impede the spread of chickenpox, claim researchers.
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Poll: Seniors happy with less social time
upi.com - 12-20-11
American seniors don't need as much social time with family and friends as younger people do to be happy, a U.S. survey indicates.
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Vitamin D Helps Bone Health Only With Calcium: Report
healthday.com - 12-20-11
A new analysis on the effects of vitamin D on bone health shows that it cuts fracture risk in older adults, but only when taken with calcium supplements.
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Bottled Tan May Keep Women Out of the Sun
healthday.com - 12-20-11
Young women who get their tan out of a bottle may spend less time sunbathing or using tanning beds, two riskier behaviors, according to a new study.
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'Nerve Snip' Might Ease Dangerous Irregular Heartbeat
healthday.com - 12-20-11
Snipping certain nerves may help prevent dangerous heart rhythms caused by stress, a small, new study suggests.
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Nearly 1 in 3 Young U.S. Adults Have Arrest Records: Study
healthday.com - 12-20-11
By the time they're old enough to vote, roughly one in four Americans has had at least one criminal arrest.
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First Aid After Tick Bites
sciencedaily.com - 12-20-11
They come out in the spring, and each year they spread further -- the ticks. Thirty percent of them transmit borrelia pathogens, the causative agent of Lyme borreliosis that can damage joints and organs. The disease often goes undetected. In the future, a new type of gel is intended to prevent an infection -- if applied after a tick bite.
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Anti-bullying classes found ineffective
upi.com - 12-19-11
Generic, cookie-cutter, anti-bullying curriculums are an ineffective substitute for student-focused engagement strategies, U.S. officials say.
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'Ecstasy' may cause long-term changes in brain chemistry
usatoday.com - 12-19-11
Recreational use of the illegal drug known as ecstasy is associated with long-term changes in brain chemistry, a small, new study reveals.
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Half of Americans have mental illness in lifetime
upi.com - 12-19-11
Nearly half of all people in the United States will experience a mental illness during their lifetimes, but the stigma remains, researchers say.
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Study: Why couples avoid marriage
upi.com - 12-19-11
Many lower-income U.S. women consider marriage a "trap" -- hard to exit with more domestic responsibilities and few benefits, researchers say.
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Pet Parade: 'Happy Howlidays'
upi.com - 12-19-11
It's time for the annual advice for keeping pets safe and sound during the hectic holidays.
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Christmas Trees and Trappings Can Fan Fire Risk
healthday.com - 12-19-11
The risk of burns increases over the holiday season because people are cooking more, putting up potentially flammable decorations and using fireplaces and candles.
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Extra Help Enhances Holidays for Older Relatives
healthday.com - 12-19-11
The holiday season is a time for family gatherings and it's important to include grandparents and other elderly relatives, experts say.
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Researchers Urge Caution When Buying Noisy Toys
sciencedaily.com - 12-19-11
While Road Rippers Lightning Rods, Let's Rock Elmo and the I Am T-Pain musical microphone might be sought-after gifts this holiday season, parents should ensure that their children don't risk permanent hearing damage by misusing them.
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Scientists May Be Able to Double Efficacy of Radiation Therapy
sciencedaily.com - 12-19-11
Scientists may have a way to double the efficacy and reduce the side effects of radiation therapy.
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Tai chi 'can help prevent falls' by improving balance' in the elderly
dailymail.co.uk - 12-18-11
Elderly people whose eyesight is failing can improve their balance and avoid dangerous falls by practising tai chi, according to a study.
Experts say the gentle martial art builds strength and also improves balance control, reducing the chances of life-threatening falls among old people with poor eyesight.
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Many surgeons don't discuss end-of-life care
msnbc.msn.com - 12-18-11
Many U.S. surgeons fail to discuss their patients' wishes in case a risky operation goes awry, and even more would not operate if patients limited what could be done to keep them alive, a survey found.
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Government adopts strict limits on chimp research
msnbc.msn.com - 12-18-11
Chimps paved astronauts' way into space and were vital in creating some important medicines. But the government said Thursday that science has advanced enough that from now on, chimpanzees essentially should be a last resort in medical research — a move that puts the United States more in line with the rest of the world.
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Smoking Raises Risk Of Squamous Cell Carcinoma Of The Skin In Women
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-18-11
Regular female smokers have a threefold higher risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, researchers from Moffitt Cancer Center reported in Cancer Causes and Control. The authors said they found a slight increase in risk among regular male smokers, but a statistically insignificant one.
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Peanut Allergies, Breakthrough Could Improve Diagnoses
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-18-11
This product may contain nuts." It's an increasingly common warning on food labels of all kinds, given the recent heightened awareness of the dangers of nut allergies. Roughly three million Americans suffer from peanut allergies; yet current diagnostic methods don't detect every case. New findings by University of Virginia scientists, however, may allow for the development of more sensitive diagnostic tools and a better understanding of nut allergies.
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Child penicillin doses should be reviewed, say experts
bbc.co.uk - 12-18-11
Penicillin doses for children - which have stayed the same for 50 years - need to be reviewed because youngsters are getting heavier, experts have said.
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Elder abuse acute during holidays
upi.com - 12-18-11
A study of elder financial abuse and exploitation found family, friends and neighbors were the perpetrators in 45 percent of the cases, a U.S. researcher says.
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Pediatricians Offer Tips to Avoid Holiday Hazards
healthday.com - 12-18-11
From buying a Christmas tree to stringing up lights and wrapping gifts, there are a number of health and safety issues parents and guardians should consider during the holidays, according to child health experts.
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Exercise drops when teens enter college
upi.com - 12-17-11
The amount of regular exercise teens get drops off severely once they enter college, especially among males, researchers in Canada say.
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Youth Internet sexual encounters decline
upi.com - 12-17-11
There's been a decline in two kinds of unwanted youth Internet sexual encounters -- sexual solicitation and exposure to pornography, U.S. researchers say.
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Get a Medical Marijuana Card, Lose Your Second Amendment Rights
reason.com - 12-17-11
If you are a medical marijuana patient in one of the 16 states (plus the District of Columbia) that allow for it, you’ve got reason to believe lately that the government has it in for you.
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Netherlands Stops Tourists Buying Marijuana in Coffee Shops
businessweek.com - 12-17-11
Foreigners traveling to the Netherlands will be barred from buying marijuana in so-called coffee shops next year, a move that could hurt tourism to the capital, Amsterdam.
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NIH Puts Crimps on Research on Chimps
abcnews.go.com - 12-17-11
The National Institutes of Health will curb its use of chimpanzees in medical and behavioral research, NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins announced Thursday.
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Smoking linked to skin cancer in women
usatoday.com - 12-17-11
If you're a woman who smokes and you are looking for another reason to quit, consider this: A new study has found a link between tobacco use and skin cancer.
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Facebook plan raises question: What's a suicidal thought?
usatoday.com - 12-17-11
Suicide experts say most suicides are preventable – because they arise from depression and other treatable mental illnesses. Yet close to 100 people in the United States kill themselves each day (and no, it does not happen more often during the holidays).
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One can of cola = one hour's run: Exercise labels could be 'more effective than calorie counts'
dailymail.co.uk - 12-17-11
Warning labels that explain how much exercise is needed to run off the calories in junk food are far more effective than traditional counts, researchers say.
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Two deaths from brain-eating amoeba linked to sinus remedy for colds
dailymail.co.uk - 12-17-11
A sinus-flushing device used to relieve colds and allergies has been linked to a deadly brain-eating amoeba.
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Post-booze blackout, how people fill in the blanks
msnbc.msn.com - 12-17-11
Getting hammered to the point of not remembering much, if anything, about it is a pretty common experience for some people on college campuses or during a long holiday weekend. Reconstructing what happened during a bout of booze-fueled amnesia can either make for a hilarious movie plot like "The Hangover" or an interesting research project.
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Many surgeons don't discuss end-of-life care
msnbc.msn.com - 12-17-11
Many U.S. surgeons fail to discuss their patients' wishes in case a risky operation goes awry, and even more would not operate if patients limited what could be done to keep them alive, a survey found.
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Roche Melanoma Drug Gets European Green Light
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-17-11
The European Medicines Agency's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) announced today its recommendation that Zelboraf (vemurafenib), an innovative protein-kinase inhibitor, used to treat metastatic or unresectable melanoma (where it cannot be surgically removed or has spread to other parts of the body) with BRAF V600 mutations, be granted marketing authorization.
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Boosting Immunity Against Cancer
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-17-11
New approaches for treating cancer are emerging all the time, and one exciting field is finding ways to boost anti-cancer mechanisms already present in the immune system. Now researchers in the US have discovered a new way to dramatically boost the capacity of certain immune cells to fight cancer. They write about their findings in the 8 December online issue of the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.
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Drug shortages at all-time U.S. high
upi.com - 12-17-11
Drug shortages in the United States are at record highs, forcing some American to forgo needed treatments, the Government Accountability Office says.
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Horticulture helps mentally challenged
upi.com - 12-17-11
Participation in horticultural activities can reduce stress in patients who are mentally challenged, researchers in South Korea say.
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Targeted Radiation for Breast Cancer May Be Overused: Study
healthday.com - 12-17-11
The number of women with breast cancer who receive targeted radiation to the breast after a lumpectomy has jumped dramatically over the last decade.
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Spouse's Reaction May Affect Pain Management
healthday.com - 12-17-11
Chronic pain can hinder communication between spouses, which, in turn, can impair the affected partner's ability to cope with the pain, according to a new study.
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Lead Levels in Drinking Water Spike When Copper and Lead Pipes Joined: Levels Linked to Galvanic Corrosion, Disinfectants, pH
sciencedaily.com - 12-17-11
Lead pipes once used routinely in municipal water distribution systems are a well-recognized source of dangerous lead contamination, but new research from Washington University in St. Louis suggests that the partial replacement of these pipes can make the problem worse.
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Performance-enhancing drug hurts brain
upi.com - 12-16-11
Erythropoietin, considered a "performance enhancing" substance for athletes, may increase risk of vascular problems in the brain, Swiss researchers said.
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Second-guessing linked to unhappiness
upi.com - 12-16-11
Fretting over which coffee maker to buy or second-guessing oneself over a house one has bought may be a recipe for unhappiness, U.S. researchers say.
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New Study Shows Promise for Preventing Preterm Births
sciencedaily.com - 12-16-11
A new study co-authored by the University of Kentucky's Dr. John O'Brien found that applying vaginal progesterone to women who are at a high risk of preterm birth significantly decreased the odds of a premature delivery.
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Britons fail to battle the bulge as 26 per cent of men AND women classed as obese
dailymail.co.uk - 12-16-11
Britons are fighting a losing battle against the bulge with more than a quarter of men and women classed as clinically obese for the first time.
Today's report from the NHS Information Centre revealed that 26 per cent of men and women were obese in 2010. This has increased from 13 per cent of men and 16 per cent of women in 1993.
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Children whose father smoked at time of conception have 15% greater risk of developing leukaemia
dailymail.co.uk - 12-16-11
Children whose fathers smoke around the time of their conception have a 15 per cent higher risk of developing the most common form of childhood cancer, a type of leukemia, say researchers.
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Average man has 9 sexual partners in lifetime, women have 4
telegraph.co.uk - 12-16-11
The Health Survey for England found that men reported having 9.3 different partners on average, with a quarter of men boasting of more than 10 conquests.
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Liar, liar, pants on fire? Your baby will be the judge
msnbc.msn.com - 12-16-11
A new study has found that babies little more than a year old can tell whether we’re trustworthy enough to listen to, according to a report published in Infant Behavior and Development.
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New Drug That Improves Memory And Prevents Brain Damage In Mice May Prevent Alzheimer's Disease Progression
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-16-11
A new drug candidate may be the first capable of halting the devastating mental decline of Alzheimer's disease, based on the findings of a study published in PLoS one.
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Dietary Fibers From Algae Help Weight Loss
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-16-11
Researchers at the Faculty of Life Sciences (LIFE) at the University of Copenhagen have established that dietary fibers from brown algae boosts the body's sensation of satiety, so that people eat less and lose more weight.
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Epilepsy In Children - Adverse Events of Invasive EEG, Study
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-16-11
According to an investigation led by Dr. Thomas Blauwblomme and his team of Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, in the December issue of Operative Neurosurgery, a quarterly supplement to Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, almost half of all children suffering with severe epilepsy who receive invasive electroencephalography (EEG) recordings, experience some type of side effect.
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Magnetic Stimulation Of Brain For Stroke Recovery
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-16-11
In a fresh hope for those who have suffered a stroke, a new research has shown that magnetic stimulation of the nerve cells in the brain, can help speed the recovery.
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Survey: 1 in 3 women affected by partner's violent behavior
cnn.com - 12-16-11
More than one in three women have experienced sexual assault, physical violence or stalking by an intimate partner during their lifetime, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey.
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How many times a day do you think about sex?
cnn.com - 12-16-11
Gentlemen, lest you were alarmed you might be abnormal for not thinking about sex once every 7 seconds (more than 8,000 times a day), a new study in the Journal of Sex Research arrives to reassure you.
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Hairy limbs keep bed bugs at bay
bbc.co.uk - 12-16-11
Hairier skin may be the key to avoiding being bitten by bed bugs, claim Sheffield academics.
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U.S. teen pot smoking at all-time high
healthday.com - 12-16-11
Daily marijuana use is at a 30-year peak level among U.S. high-school seniors but alcohol use and tobacco smoking is down, a survey indicates.
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Recession Hurting Parent-Child Ties, Survey Finds
healthday.com - 12-16-11
The recent recession took a toll on parent-child ties, with parents who were under financial strain reporting that they felt less connected to their kids and kids saying they were less likely to act with generosity, a new study finds.
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Poor Lifestyles Harming U.S. Heart Health: Report
healthday.com - 12-16-11
Americans' heart health is in a woeful state, says this year's report card from the American Heart Association.
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Cancer from Fetal Exposure to Carcinogens Depends On Dose, Timing
sciencedaily.com - 12-16-11
The cancer-causing potential of fetal exposure to carcinogens can vary substantially, a recent study suggests, causing different types of problems much later in life depending on the stage of pregnancy when the fetus is exposed.
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Few foods are source of vitamin D
upi.com - 12-16-11
Vitamin D deficiency is common in winter, with earlier sunsets and weaker rays, and few foods are sources of vitamin D, a U.S. food expert says.
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Ideas of acceptable weight form early
upi.com - 12-16-11
An individual's concept of acceptable weight is formed during childhood and is not significantly influenced by later social networks, British researchers say.
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Men tend to overestimate women's desire
upi.com - 12-16-11
Men looking for a quick hookup are more likely to overestimate a woman's desire for them, U.S. researchers found.
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Teens Smoking Fewer Cigarettes, More Marijuana
webmd.com - 12-15-11
Fewer teens than ever are smoking cigarettes, but marijuana use has steadily increased over the past five years, according to a new nationwide survey.
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Study sheds light on preemies' higher SIDS risk
usatoday.com - 12-15-11
Babies who are born prematurely are known to be at higher risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), and new research now suggests that's because their underdeveloped nervous systems can't control drops in blood pressure as needed during sleep.
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Woman's fake breast disappears during Pilates
msnbc.msn.com - 12-15-11
There's really no other way to put this: During a Pilates stretching exercise, a 59-year-old woman said her body "swallowed" one of her fake boobs. Sounds like something we just made up, but the woman's case is the subject of an unbelievable report, just published online in the latest New England Journal of Medicine.
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Just 51% Of US Adults Married Today, Compared To 72% Fifty
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-15-11
The proportion of American adults who are married today is the lowest ever, according to a new report published by Pew Research. Not only is marriage becoming progressively avoided, the authors added, but also people are waiting longer to tie the traditional knot. The average age for getting married is now 26.5 for females and 28.7 for males.
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Stroke Risk Driven By Diet Quality And Overeating, Rather Than Individual Nutrients
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-15-11
A review published in the special stroke issue of The Lancet Neurology says that many of the numerous studies on stroke prevention have been based on unreliable evidence. The same applies to headlines that have highlighted potential benefits of specific nutrients and foods. According to researchers, the risk of stroke is more likely to be predicted by dietary patterns and excess energy intake, i.e. overeating.
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Indoor Tanning Strong Risk Factor For Skin Cancer In Young People
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-15-11
Compared to those who have never used it, young people who use indoor tanning have a 69% higher risk of developing a type of skin cancer called basal cell carcinoma (BCC), according to a new study led by researchers from the Yale School of Public Health in the US that was published online on 12 December in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.
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1 in 9 high school seniors using synthetic marijuana
cnn.com - 12-15-11
Teenage drinking and cigarette smoking is at a historic low, but marijuana use and prescription drug abuse continue at high rates, according to a new report looking at trends among teens.
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24,000 diabetes deaths a year 'could be avoided'
bbc.co.uk - 12-15-11
Up to 24,000 diabetes-related deaths could be avoided in England each year, if patients and doctors better managed the condition, a report concludes.
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Study: Americans eat too much sugar
upi.com - 12-15-11
Experts recommend women consume no more than 6 teaspoons of sugar per day, and men eat no more than 9 teaspoons, but Americans eat much more, researchers say.
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Toddlers overdosing from prescriptions
upi.com - 12-15-11
One of every 150 U.S. 2-year-olds visits a hospital emergency room each year for an unintentional medication overdose, federal health officials say.
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Higher Hospital Admissions Equal Higher Readmissions: Study
healthday.com - 12-15-11
Efforts to reduce costly hospital readmissions have focused on improving patient care just after discharge. But much of the readmission problem may be due to an overuse of inpatient hospital services in the first place, a new study suggests.
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Headaches May Plague Many With HIV/AIDS
healthday.com - 12-15-11
Headache affects 50 percent of HIV/AIDS patients in the United States, and many of those headaches are severe, a new study says.
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Millions of Americans Are Victims of Sexual Violence: CDC
healthday.com - 12-15-11
Every minute in the United States, 24 people are victims of rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner, according to an estimate from a new federal report.
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Follow Your Nose: Compared to Neanderthals, Modern Humans Have a Better Sense of Smell
sciencedaily.com - 12-15-11
Differences in the temporal lobes and olfactory bulbs also suggest a combined use of brain functions related to cognition and olfaction. The increase of brain size is intimately linked to the evolution of humanity. Two different human species, Neanderthals and modern humans, have independently evolved brains of roughly the same size but with differing shapes. This could indicate a difference in the underlying brain organization.
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How the Bioweapon Ricin Kills: Scientists Solve Mystery Through Revolutionary New Technology
sciencedaily.com - 12-14-11
A key protein that controls how the deadly plant poison and bioweapon ricin kills, has finally been identified by researchers at the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology in Vienna, Austria. The discovery was made using a revolutionary technology that combines stem cell biology and modern screening methods, and reported on 2 December 2011 in the scientific journal Cell Stem Cell.
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Few Allergies in Unstressed Babies, Swedish Researchers Find
sciencedaily.com - 12-14-11
A new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows that infants with low concentrations of the stress-related hormone cortisol in their saliva develop fewer allergies than other infants. Hopefully this new knowledge will be useful in future allergy prevention.
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Medicare changes payment plan to fight drug fraud
usatoday.com - 12-14-11
Medicare will not pay prescription-drug bills if officials see evidence of fraud, which will let them avoid chasing down money after it has been paid out, Vice President Biden announced Tuesday.
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Holiday Decorating Injuries on the Rise
abcnews.go.com - 12-14-11
The Consumer Product Safety Commission said Tuesday that injuries involving falls from ladders while stringing lights, cuts from broken glass ornaments and other decorating activities are on the rise.
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Too much alcohol linked to unsafe sex, study confirms
usatoday.com - 12-14-11
Unsafe sex is the most common cause of HIV infection and finding ways to prevent unsafe sex is a major goal of public health efforts to prevent HIV/AIDS.
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Scientists say they're close to unlocking the secrets of immortality
msnbc.msn.com - 12-14-11
Until very recently, nobody really thought it would be possible to extend a person’s lifespan much beyond a century. Now some scientists are saying that immortality, or something very much like it, might be just around the corner. They say it might even be a possibility for people living today.
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Malaria Global Mortality Down 25% In Ten Years
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-14-11
Mortality rates for malaria have dropped by over 25% worldwide since the beginning of the millennium, according to World Malaria Report 2011, issued by WHO (World Health Organization). Progress in Africa has been especially impressive, where death rates have dropped by 33% since 2000. WHO says these encouraging figures are mainly due to a considerable scaling up of prevention and control measures over the last ten years. Examples include much wider usage of bed nets, improved diagnostics, and better access to effective malaria medications.
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FDA Committee Recommends Approval Of ADASUVE For Bipolar And Schizophrenia
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-14-11
The Psychopharmacologic Drugs Advisory Committee (PDAC) of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) voted to recommend that ADASUVE(TM) (Staccato® loxapine) be approved for use as a single dose in 24 hours. It should be used alongside the FDA recommended Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS), when patients with schizophrenia or bipolar mania are exhibiting symptoms of agitation.
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Age of criminal responsibility 'too low', experts say
bbc.co.uk - 12-14-11
Advances in neuroscience suggest the age of criminal responsibility - 10 in England, Wales and Northern Ireland - might be too low, according to a study.
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U.S. Safety Board Urges Nationwide Ban on Drivers' Use of Cellphones
healthday.com - 12-14-11
In the aftermath of a deadly crash in Missouri that killed two and injured 38, the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board is recommending a nationwide ban on drivers' use of cellphones and other personal electronic devices, except in emergencies.
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Some Causes of Stillbirth May Be Avoidable: Studies
healthday.com - 12-14-11
Stillbirth has long been a mysterious and devastating pregnancy complication. But two new studies are uncovering more about what causes stillbirth and the factors that may raise a woman's chances of having a stillbirth -- at least some of which are avoidable.
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'Ecstasy' May Cause Long-Term Changes in Brain Chemistry
healthday.com - 12-14-11
Recreational use of the illegal drug known as ecstasy is associated with long-term changes in brain chemistry, a small, new study reveals.
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Mothers' Weight Before and During Pregnancy Affects Baby's Weight
sciencedaily.com - 12-14-11
A new study published in the journal Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica (AOGS) reveals that both pre-pregnant weight (body mass index, BMI) and weight gain in pregnancy are important predictors of babies' birthweight. This is important since high birthweight may also predict adult overweight.
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Catch the Fever: It'll Help You Fight Off Infection, Evidence Shows
sciencedaily.com - 12-14-11
With cold and flu season almost here, the next time you're sick, you may want to think twice before taking something for your fever. That's because scientists have found more evidence that elevated body temperature helps certain types of immune cells to work better. This research is reported in the November 2011 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology.
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Sex tourism draws middle, upper-class men
upi.com - 12-14-11
Today's technology and ease of transportation have helped facilitate the growing global sex tourism industry, a U.S. researcher says.
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New way found to fend off hospital infections
upi.com - 12-14-11
Researchers in Canada say their new disinfection system may change the way hospital rooms, and perhaps hotel rooms, worldwide are cleaned.
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All pregnant women should take vitamin D, coroner says
telegraph.co.uk - 12-14-11
North London coroner Andrew Walker said action should be taken to reduce the risk to others after he held an inquest last week into the death of a three-month-old boy.
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Kids' CT scans raise fears of cancer risk as use soars
usatoday.com - 12-13-11
A child gets rushed into an emergency room and doctors order a CT scan -- one of the most reliable diagnostic tools to check for maladies from appendicitis to traumatic injuries.
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Sweet-toothed mothers risk having sugar addict babies and put their long-term health at risk
dailymail.co.uk - 12-13-11
Babies are being born addicted to sugar because their mothers eat too much during pregnancy.
The infants are being forced on to sugary drips just hours after birth to counter withdrawal symptoms.
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Parents claim link between flu vaccine and narcolepsy
telegraph.co.uk - 12-13-11
Caroline Hadfield claims her six-year-old son Josh developed the condition just three weeks after being given the jab.
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Birth control choices confuse many young adults
msnbc.msn.com - 12-13-11
Worried about birth control in light of headlines about side effects from Yaz and the patch? Women have a lot of options that are safe and effective, including some that are even more reliable.
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Nab-Paclitaxel Beats Docetaxel As First-Line Treatment For Metastatic Breast Cancer
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-13-11
Nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane for Injectable Suspension), at a dose of 150 mg/m2 weekly, improves overall survival (OS) to a much greater degree than conventional taxane monotherapy in women with previously untreated metastatic breast cancer (MBC), according to results of a phase II study released at the 34th Annual San Antonio Breast Cancer symposium (SABCS).
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No increase in heart attack, stroke risk seen with ADHD meds
cnn.com - 12-13-11
The million-plus U.S. adults who take medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) do not appear to be increasing their risk of heart attack or stroke, as some experts have feared, according to a new study published today on the website of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
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Depressed moms linked to child disorders
upi.com - 12-13-11
Children whose mothers were depressed throughout their first year of life have a higher risk of mental disorders themselves by age 6, researchers in Israel say.
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Listening to body signals aids weight loss
upi.com - 12-13-11
Mastering mindful eating -- awareness of eating -- and stress-reduction techniques help prevent weight gain even without dieting, U.S. researchers say.
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Hormone may ease social awkwardness
upi.com - 12-13-11
First dates or Christmas cocktail parties can be major stressors for some, but an oxytocin nasal spray may make a difference, Canadian researchers say.
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Birth Defects Seem Rare in Kids of Childhood Cancer Survivors
healthday.com - 12-13-11
Children of parents who survived childhood cancer are unlikely to suffer from birth defects, finds a new study that should allay some concerns about long-term effects of treatment.
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Blink Patterns May Be a Window Into Autistic Mind
healthday.com - 12-13-11
Toddlers with autism show different blink patterns than other children, a finding that researchers say may provide a clue to the way people with autism process what they see.
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Friends and Loved Ones Yawn Together
sciencedaily.com - 12-13-11
Everybody knows that yawning is contagious. When a person yawns, other people can respond by yawning. What wasn't known is that "yawn transmission" is more frequent, and faster, between people sharing an empathic bond: close friends, kin, and mates. The study carried out by Ivan Norscia and Elisabetta Palagi of the University of Pisa (Natural History Museum) and Cnr-Istc of Rome, provides the first behavioural evidence that yawn infectiveness can be a form of emotional contagion.
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Breast Cancer Survivors Struggle With Cognitive Problems Several Years After Treatment
sciencedaily.com - 12-13-11
A new analysis has found that breast cancer survivors may experience problems with certain mental abilities several years after treatment, regardless of whether they were treated with chemotherapy plus radiation or radiation only. Published early online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study indicates that there may be common and treatment-specific ways that cancer therapies negatively affect cancer survivors' mental abilities.
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Diabetes risk of two takeaways in a week (and women are more in danger)
dailymail.co.uk - 12-12-11
Two takeaways a week are enough to increase the risk of diabetes and heart disease, research shows.
Young adults were more likely to have hidden health problems if they treated themselves to fast food on a twice-weekly basis, the study found.
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The Ferrari of cancer treatments: New radiotherapy machine which can destroy brain tumours... and even restore sight
dailymail.co.uk - 12-12-11
The room is dark and silent. Out of the blackness, two vivid green laser lines converge across the masked face of a figure lying motionless on a bed. Above her, a steel arm whirrs into life, rotating in choreographed movements around her head.
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Keeping out of the sun 'is bringing rickets back' as cases increase fivefold in 14 years
dailymail.co.uk - 12-12-11
The number of British children suffering from rickets has increased fivefold since 1997, figures have revealed.
More than 760 were admitted to hospital last year with the condition, caused by a shortage of Vitamin D – the vital chemical which is boosted by sunlight.
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Indian tribe turns to tradition to fight diabetes
msnbc.msn.com - 12-12-11
The Tohono Indian Nation in south central Arizona is turning to old tribal ways to solve a modern health problem.
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The scent of a man? It could be an STD
msnbc.msn.com - 12-12-11
Would-be lovers wondering whether to go forward with a new relationship might heed the advice of Russian scientists: Take a deep whiff.
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Salmonella Tainted Cilantro - Over 6,000 Cartons Recalled, USA
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-12-11
The FDA (Food and Drug Administration) informs that 6,141 cartons of Cilantro are being recalled after some samples tested positive for Salmonella at distributor level. Pacific International Marketing has issued the recall and the FDA says they and Pacific are liaising closely.
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Research Raises New Questions About Animal Empathy
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-12-11
The emotions of rats and mice and the mental infrastructure behind them promise to illuminate the nature of human emotions, including empathy and nurturance, a Washington State University neuroscientist writes in this Friday's issue of the journal Science.
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Vaccine may prevent cruise ship virus
upi.com - 12-12-11
Researchers are working on a vaccine that might one day prevent norovirus, which has made many cruise ship passengers in the United States ill.
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Adult Sickle Cell Drug May Benefit Kids, Too
healthday.com - 12-12-11
A drug called hydroxyurea that's approved for use in adults with severe sickle cell anemia can also help young children with the disease, new research suggests.
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Drug for Acute Respiratory Distress May Do More Harm Than Good: Study
healthday.com - 12-12-11
A study assessing intravenous infusion of the drug salbutamol in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome was halted because the treatment did not improve patient outcomes and was associated with an increased risk of death, researchers say.
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Low-Dose Aspirin After Lung Clot Could Prevent Recurrence
healthday.com - 12-12-11
Giving low-dose aspirin to patients after they've received stronger blood thinners for dangerous clots in the lungs could cut their odds of redeveloping the clots, a new study finds.
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'Downloading' new skills into our brains like characters on The Matrix set to become a reality, say scientists
dailymail.co.uk - 12-11-11
Learning a martial art, how to fly a plane or how to speak a new language without even being awake is set to become a reality, say researchers.
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Rape in the US military: America's dirty little secret
guardian.co.uk - 12-11-11
"It was eight years before I was able to say the word that describes what happened to me," says Maricella Guzman. "I hadn't even been in the Navy a month. I was so young. I tried to report it. But instead of being taken seriously, I was forced to do push-ups."
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Nasty Side Effects Make Breast Cancer Patients Quit Drugs Early
abcnews.go.com - 12-11-11
More than one third of women taking a certain class of breast cancer drugs are so bothered by side effects that they stop taking the pills before their treatment is complete, according to a new study.
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Study: Best antidepressant may depend on patient
usatoday.com - 12-11-11
This suggests that the choice of which drug is appropriate for which patient should be made on the basis of such considerations as side effects, cost and patient preference.
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Barefoot running: bad or beneficial?
msnbc.msn.com - 12-11-11
Despite the cold and many other potential hazards, naked from the ankle down is the way Anna Toombs likes it, and she gets plenty of catcalls in the street as a result.
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Hemophilia B - Single Gene Therapy Treatment Offers Significant Improvement
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-11-11
Patients with hemophilia B experienced considerable improvements and fewer injections with clotting factor to reduce bleeding after receiving just one treatment with gene therapy, researchers from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, USA, and University College London (UCL), England, reported in NEJM (New England Journal of Medicine).
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Breast Cancer Prevention - Part Time Low Carb Diet Better Than Standard Full Time Diets
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-11-11
Women who go on a low carb diet just two days per week have a lower risk of developing breast cancer compared to those who follow a standard calorie-restricted diet every day of the week, in order to lose weight and lower their insulin blood levels. Long-term high blood insulin levels are known to raise cancer risk. These findings were presented by scientists from Genesis Prevention Center at University Hospital in South Manchester, England, at the 2011 CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.
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Elekta's Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion Earns Nearly Perfect Score In 2011 KLAS Radiation Therapy Report
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-11-11
With a score of 94.4 out of 100, Elekta's Leksell Gamma Knife® Perfexion™ is "practically perfect in every way," ranking at the top among six advanced radiation therapy systems, according to KLAS research firm's recently released customer survey, Radiation Therapy 2011: A Dose of New Technology. The Elekta Infinity™ radiation treatment system garnered the #2 ranking with a score of 84.4, improving its score over the 2010 report.
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Abortion 'does not raise' mental health risk
bbc.co.uk - 12-11-11
Abortion does not raise the risk of a woman suffering mental health problems, a major review by experts concludes.
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Gene Therapy a Boon for 6 Hemophilia Patients
healthday.com - 12-11-11
A single treatment of gene therapy dramatically improved symptoms and quality of life in a small group of men with hemophilia B, an uncommon form of the bleeding disorder, a new study suggests.
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Low-Dose Aspirin After Lung Clot Could Prevent Recurrence
healthday.com - 12-11-11
Giving low-dose aspirin to patients after they've received stronger blood thinners for dangerous clots in the lungs could cut their odds of redeveloping the clots, a new study finds.
More...


Broadway Strikes an Autism-Friendly Chord
healthday.com - 12-11-11
For most Americans, attending the theater is just one more form of entertainment. But for Katie Sweeney and her family, a recent trip to Broadway was true cause for celebration.
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Bust supplement may increase cancer risk
upi.com - 12-11-11
Women who take supplements containing mycoestrogen zearalenone, or ZEN, a naturally occurring toxin may increase breast cancer risk, British researchers say.
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In the U.S., sex occurs spontaneously
upi.com - 12-11-11
For most U.S. adults, sex is not something one makes an appointment for -- rather, it occurs spontaneously for the vast majority, a survey indicates.
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Tart cherry juice may enhance sleep
upi.com - 12-10-11
People who have trouble sleeping may find help by drinking two glasses of tart cherry juice a day, researchers in Britain say.
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Hospital urinary tract infections common
upi.com - 12-10-11
U.S. hospitals attempt to prevent hospital-acquired infections, but a survey shows few are aggressively combating catheter-associated urinary tract infections.
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Eating white bread and pasta could increase risk of breast cancer returning in patients
dailymail.co.uk - 12-10-11
Eating plenty of cereal, bread and potatoes may boost the risk of breast cancer recurring in survivors, say scientists.
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Stress during second and third month of pregnancy raises risk of premature birth and losing baby boys
dailymail.co.uk - 12-10-11
Mothers-to-be who are highly stressed during the second and third month of pregnancy are more at risk of giving birth prematurely and losing boy babies, say researchers.
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Diet craze leaves Norwegians begging for butter
msnbc.msn.com - 12-10-11
Norwegians have eaten up the country's entire stockpile of butter, partly as the result of a "low-carb" diet sweeping the Nordic nation which emphasizes a higher intake of fats.
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Indian tribe turns to tradition to fight diabetes
msnbc.msn.com - 12-10-11
Over the past several decades, Type 2 diabetes has exploded on the Tohono O’odham reservation, striking half of the adults living there. That’s compared to an 8.3 percent rate among adults in the U.S. overall, according to government estimates.
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Animal Study Offers Insights Into Possible Drug Targets To Improve Memory As We Age
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-10-11
Drugs that affect the levels of an important brain protein involved in learning and memory reverse cellular changes in the brain seen during aging, according to an animal study in The Journal of Neuroscience. The findings could one day aid in the development of new drugs that enhance cognitive function in older adults.
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Oxytocin Makes You Feel More Extroverted
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-10-11
Dutch courage takes on a new meaning with research showing that oxytocin makes people feel more extroverted. You can put down the tequila shots and pick up a hangover free nasal spray instead.
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Brains Of Taxi Drivers Change As They Learn To Navigate The Streets
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-10-11
The process of learning to navigate and locate thousands of city streets and places of interest causes structural changes in the brains of London taxi drivers, according to a new study published in Current Biology on 8 December. The findings should encourage those interested in life-long learning and undergoing rehabilitation after brain injury, as they show the adult brain is more "plastic" than we thought when faced with new challenges, said the authors.
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When is a woman more likely to fake it?
cnn.com - 12-10-11
Ladies, how many of you have ever faked it? If so, why? Did you fake it because your orgasm just wasn’t going to happen? Or did you do it because his orgasm happened all too quickly? In that case, perhaps you faked your own orgasm to spare his feelings, or maybe to avoid having to talk about it.
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British Study Suggests Mammograms Do More Harm Than Good
healthday.com - 12-10-11
Women aged 40 and older who follow recommendations to have annual mammograms may do themselves more harm than good, British researchers report.
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Obese Patients May Benefit the Most From Surgery for Irregular Heartbeat
healthday.com - 12-10-11
Overweight or obese individuals who undergo a procedure to treat an irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation may see greater improvements in their quality of life after the treatment than their thinner counterparts.
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Behavior Problems May Surface in Preemies by Preschool
healthday.com - 12-10-11
Preschool children who were born just a few weeks too early are at increased risk for behavioral and emotional problems, new research suggests.
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'Love Hormone' May Buffer Kids From Mom's Depression
healthday.com - 12-10-11
Children born to mothers with postpartum depression are at increased risk for mental health problems, but a hormone called oxytocin may reduce the risk, according to a new study.
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Research Could Help People With Declining Sense of Smell
sciencedaily.com - 12-10-11
University of California, Berkeley, neuroscientists have discovered a genetic trigger that makes the nose renew its smell sensors, providing hope for new therapies for people who have lost their sense of smell due to trauma or old age.
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Romaine Lettuce Blamed for E. Coli Outbreak
foxnews.com - 12-10-11
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has determined that romaine lettuce from a single farm is likely to blame for an E. coli outbreak in Georgia, Missouri and eight other states.
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Woman caught making meth inside S. Tulsa Walmart
fox23.com - 12-10-11
Tulsa police arrest a woman for mixing chemicals to make meth inside a south Tulsa Walmart on Thursday.
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Marijuana Prices Rising After Federal Crackdown
kqed.org - 12-10-11
A crackdown by federal prosecutors is casting a long shadow over the state’s marijuana industry, but there is one bright spot, at least for some Northern California growers willing to risk prison time: Wholesale prices appear to be on the rise.
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Money worries hurt parent-child connection
upi.com - 12-10-11
Middle- to upper-middle-class parents with financial problems and depression are less likely than others to connect to their children, U.S. researchers say.
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Hair Is An Extension Of The Nervous System
Why Indians Keep Their Hair Long

rense.com - 12-10-11
Our culture leads people to believe that hair style is a matter of personal preference, that hair style is a matter of fashion and/or convenience, and that how people wear their hair is simply a cosmetic issue. Back in the Viet Nam war however, an entirely different picture emerged, one that has been carefully covered up and hidden from public view.
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Zumba injuries on the rise
upi.com - 12-9-11
U.S. doctors say they are seeing a growing number of patients for injuries related to Zumba fitness classes.
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Heart risk begins early in overweight kids
upi.com - 12-9-11
Negative heart-health implications can be observed as early as age 3 for overweight children, U.S. researchers say.
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Just three MINUTES of exercise a week could prevent diabetes, say scientists
dailymail.co.uk - 12-9-11
Just one minute of exercise a day could prevent diabetes, researchers claimed today.
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Frequent cuddles from mum could help children 'resist taking drugs later in life '
dailymail.co.uk - 12-9-11
An attentive, nurturing mother may be the key to helping her children resist the temptations of drug use as adults, a study has found.
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Sexy guppies shed light on human singles scene
msnbc.msn.com - 12-9-11
If you are looking for romance, is it better to have a hot or homely wingman (or wingwoman)?
We got to wondering because a study of guppies – yes, little fish -- out this week in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, showed that when females don’t want attention from males, they hang out with especially sexy females (in guppies, sexy means “willing to have sex”).
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Steps Women Can Take To Lower Breast Cancer Risk, Report
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-9-11
A new Institute of Medicine (IOM) report released on Wednesday concludes there are some evidence-based steps women can take to reduce their risk of developing breast cancer associated with environmental factors. These include avoiding unnecessary medical radiation (such as unessential X-rays and CT-scans), not smoking, avoiding use of estrogen-progestin menopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) if possible, limiting alcohol intake, keeping to a healthy weight (especially after the menopause), and exercising regularly.
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Genetic clue to MS identified
upi.com - 12-9-11
A rare genetic variant which causes reduced levels of vitamin D appears to be directly linked to multiple sclerosis, British and Canadian researchers say.
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Early Ovary Removal May Raise Arthritis, Osteoporosis Risk
healthday.com - 12-9-11
Women under the age of 45 who have their ovaries removed are more likely to be diagnosed with arthritis and have lower bone mineral density, a predictor of osteoporosis, a new study finds.
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Rats Can Lend a Helping Paw to Others, Study Finds
healthday.com - 12-9-11
Rats may have gotten a bum rap. Far from being self-centered scroungers, a new study found that the rodents showed what looks like real empathy -- repeatedly freeing trapped companions, even when they're given the opportunity to eat chocolate instead.
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Digging Up Clues: Research On Buried Blow Flies to Help Crime Scene Investigators
sciencedaily.com - 12-9-11
When investigating a murder, every clue helps. New research from North Carolina State University sheds light on how -- and whether -- blow flies survive when buried underground during their development. It's an advance that will help forensic investigators understand how long a body may have been left above ground before being buried -- or possibly whether remains were moved from one grave to another.
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Stinky Frogs Are a Treasure Trove of Antibiotic Substances
sciencedaily.com - 12-9-11
Some of the nastiest smelling creatures on Earth have skin that produces the greatest known variety of anti-bacterial substances that hold promise for becoming new weapons in the battle against antibiotic-resistant infections, scientists are reporting. Their research on amphibians so smelly (like rotten fish, for instance) that scientists term them "odorous frogs" appears in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research.
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Binge drinking linked to sex assault
upi.com - 12-9-11
The degree to which women college students consume alcohol is linked to their chance of being sexually victimized, U.S. researchers said.
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Study: Many who cohabit eventually marry
upi.com - 12-8-11
hree-fifths of young U.S. adults who cohabit eventually get married, researchers say.
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Flexible workplace = improved health
upi.com - 12-8-11
Judging an employee not on hours spent in the office, but on output, increases the health of the employee, U.S. researchers found.
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Yawns More Contagious Between Loved Ones
abcnews.go.com - 12-8-11
Yawns are more contagious between family members and friends than strangers, a new study found.
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Some reject retirement, keep working even into 90s
usatoday.com - 12-8-11
At 91, Maxine Bennett still works six days a week at her jewelry store: keeping the books, helping customers and occasionally going on buying trips.
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Women who mix day and night shifts 'have a greater risk of type 2 diabetes'
dailymail.co.uk - 12-8-11
Women who mix day and night shifts are at greater risk of type 2 diabetes a study has found.
People who rotate through shifts for just a few years are more to susceptible because they are more likely to suffer from disrupted eating patterns and sleep deprivation, which in turn leads to weight gain.
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Running marathons 'could permanently damage the heart'
dailymail.co.uk - 12-8-11
Running marathons could cause permanent heart damage, say scientists.
A study found that high-endurance activities can lead to scarring of the right ventricle, increasing the risk of health complications.
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Child abuse changes the brain, study finds
msnbc.msn.com - 12-8-11
Children exposed to family violence show the same pattern of activity in their brains as soldiers exposed to combat, scientists said on Monday.
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A Key Trick to Bed Bugs' Persistence: Inbreeding
time.com - 12-8-11
If bed bugs seem to be everywhere, it's probably because they are. Some bug watchers have estimated that populations of the tiny, blood-sucking mattress-dwellers have jumped by as much as 500% in recent years, and a 2010 survey found that 95% of exterminators in the U.S. had reported taking care of at least one bed bug infestation in the past year.
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U.S. Health Secretary Says 'No' to Morning-After Pill for Younger Teens
healthday.com - 12-8-11
The emergency contraceptive called Plan B will not be made available without a prescription to young women under the age of 17, U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced Wednesday.
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MS May Take a Different Pathway Than Previously Thought
healthday.com - 12-8-11
Multiple sclerosis may begin in the outer layer of the brain and work its way into the deep interior, according to a new study that upends long-held beliefs about the nervous system disease.
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Short Walk Cuts Chocolate Consumption in Half
sciencedaily.com - 12-8-11
A 15-minute walk can cut snacking on chocolate at work by half, according to research by the University of Exeter. The study showed that, even in stressful situations, workers eat only half as much chocolate as they normally would after this short burst of physical activity.
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Rape, abuse linked to PTSD in women
upi.com - 12-8-11
Women with post-traumatic stress disorder who report a history of rape or child physical abuse are more likely to suffer chronic PTSD, U.S. researchers say.
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Bad lifestyle choices up cancer risks
upi.com - 12-8-11
Nearly half of cancers diagnosed in Britain each year are caused by avoidable life choices including smoking, drinking and bad diet, a review found.
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Sugar levels still high in kids' cereals
upi.com - 12-8-11
Some popular children's cereals are still packed with sugar, with three brands having more in a one-cup serving than a Hostess Twinkie, a U.S. study says.
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Computer program can help spot child abuse
upi.com - 12-7-11
U.S. researchers say a new computer program can help paramedics and pediatricians determine whether an injured child was abused.
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Obama FDA Considers Putting Morning-After Pill on Supermarket Shelves
weeklystandard.com - 12-7-11
The Washington Post reports that, under President Obama and his Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, the Food and Drug Administration is considering letting “anyone of any age buy the controversial morning-after pill Plan B directly off drugstore and supermarket shelves without a prescription.”
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Sex education has opposition in Indonesia
upi.com - 12-7-11
Efforts to introduce sex education into Indonesian schools have been hampered by conservatives who believe it encourages premarital sex, officials said.
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Marijuana use among young adults at highest levels
rgj.com - 12-7-11
Growing up in Greeley, Colo., Justin Luke Riley heard lots of anti-drug messages at home, school and church. But he ignored them to escape his insecurities and fit in better with his high school tennis team; at age 15, he got hooked.
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UCSF Study Finds Medical Marijuana Could Help Patients Reduce Pain with Opiates
ucsf.edu - 12-7-11
A UCSF study suggests patients with chronic pain may experience greater relief if their doctors add cannabinoids – the main ingredient in cannabis or medical marijuana – to an opiates-only treatment. The findings, from a small-scale study, also suggest that a combined therapy could result in reduced opiate dosages.
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Curse of the black bags! Winter ages a woman's eyes by nearly FIVE YEARS as vitamin D and happy hormone levels drop
dailymail.co.uk - 12-7-11
Winter ages a woman's eyes by four years and eight months, a team of beauty scientists have claimed.
The anti-ageing experts studied the eyes of 5,000 women throughout the seasons for a clinical study.
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Sick'nd by Chik'n? Food police take the fun out of fungus meat
msnbc.msn.com - 12-7-11
Matt Ernst started worrying when his face swelled up and turned deep red. Panic hit when his throat began to feel tighter and tighter, till he was gasping for air.
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Breast Cancer, Chemotherapy And Prolonged Fatigue
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-7-11
In a follow-up study, researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center and colleagues have found that patients who receive chemotherapy for breast cancer might experience prolonged fatigue years after their therapy. The new study, published in the American Cancer Society's current issue of CANCER, is a follow-up to a study on fatigue and chemotherapy and radiotherapy for breast cancer Moffitt researchers published in CANCER in 2007.
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Cyberchondria could save your life
cnn.com - 12-7-11
After traveling seven hours in the Chevy Impala he drives for work, Cliff Roberts wasn't overly concerned when he started feeling as if his legs were asleep -- stinging and vaguely numb.
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Japan's Meiji recalls baby milk after caesium find
bbc.co.uk - 12-7-11
Japanese milk powder maker Meiji has recalled its baby formula after discovering radioactive caesium in the product.
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Rotating Shift Work May Boost Women's Diabetes Risk
healthday.com - 12-7-11
Working rotating night shifts may do more than leave you tired; it may also increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, new research finds.
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Steroids May Boost Survival for Very Preemie Babies
healthday.com - 12-7-11
Giving steroids to pregnant women at risk for preterm birth as early as 23 weeks during their pregnancy may boost an infant's overall chance of survival and reduce the baby's risk of serious developmental issues, including brain injury, a new study says.
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Very Low Birth Weight May Affect Adult Memory, IQ
healthday.com - 12-7-11
Adults who had a very low birth weight are more likely to have memory and attention problems than those who had a low to normal birth weight, a new study says.
It included 103 adults who had a very low birth weight (less than 3.3 pounds) and 105 adults who weighed more than that at birth. The participants, aged 21 to 30, completed tests that assessed their thinking skills, including vocabulary, ability to understand words, memory and IQ.
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Vermont is the healthiest state; Miss. the least
upi.com - 12-7-11
For the fifth year in a row, Vermont is the nation's healthiest state and for the 10th year Mississippi is the least healthy, a ranking of all states shows.
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Doctor: Heed post-menopausal bleeding
upi.com - 12-7-11
Recognizing possible symptoms of gynecologic cancers can lead to diagnosis and timely treatment, a U.S. gynecologic oncologist says.
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Obesity stigma tied to hefty pay cut
upi.com - 12-7-11
Wages were $8,666 lower for women and $4,772 lower for men in 2004, compared to those of normal weight, U.S. researchers found.
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Rare US bumblebee last seen in 1956 'rediscovered'
msnbc.msn.com - 12-7-11
An elusive bumblebee, which was last seen in 1956, was recently found living in the White Mountains of south-central New Mexico, scientists announced Monday.
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Vaccine developed against Ebola
bbc.co.uk - 12-7-11
Scientists have developed a vaccine that protects mice against a deadly form of the Ebola virus.
First identified in 1976, Ebola fever kills more than 90% of the people it infects.
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Feds crack down on homeopathic weight loss remedy
usatoday.com - 12-7-11
The government is cracking down on companies that sell popular over-the-counter weight-loss products containing the hormone HCG.
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Teen sexting less prevalent than thought
upi.com - 12-6-11
Far fewer U.S. minors send sexually suggestive cellphone images than school officials, police and lawmakers feared, a study published Monday indicated.
One in 10 children ages 10 to 17 say they've used a cellphone to send or receive sexually suggestive images, but only 1 in 100 has sent images considered graphic enough to violate child pornography laws, the Crimes Against Children Research Center at the University of New Hampshire study found.
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Some California medical marijuana stores forced out of business by crackdowns
sacbee.com - 12-6-11
Eight marijuana stores – from as many as 99 dispensaries that opened – are left. Dozens have closed in recent weeks amid fears of federal prosecution and aggressive actions by the county that include litigation and fines for building code violations.
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Few parents recall doctor saying their child was overweight
usatoday.com - 12-6-11
Pediatricians are supposed to track if youngsters are putting on too many pounds — but a new study found less than a quarter of parents of overweight children recall the doctor ever saying there was a problem.
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Study finds surge in young nurses over past decade
usatoday.com - 12-6-11
A surge in young nurses may ease forecasts of coming shortages as their baby-boomer coworkers retire.
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Too promiscuous to donate an organ? Maybe, CDC says
msnbc.msn.com - 12-6-11
If you've had sex with two or more partners in the past year, you may be considered a risky organ donor, at least according to proposed new federal health guidelines that have drawn sharp protests from transplant experts who say they're far too broad.
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Childhood Mistreatment Causes Reduced Brain Volume
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-6-11
An article released this week in the December issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals, outlines evidence for poor upbringing in children leading to reduced brain volume. Specifically, researchers have found that cerebral gray matter changes due to bad treatment, and "early life stress" seems to inhibit the development of the brain.
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Sound And Vision Linked In Perception Of Moving Objects
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-6-11
"Imagine you are playing ping-pong with a friend. Your friend makes a serve. Information about where and when the ball hit the table is provided by both vision and hearing. Scientists have believed that each of the senses produces an estimate relevant for the task (in this example, about the location or time of the ball's impact) and then these votes get combined subconsciously according to rules that take into account which sense is more reliable. And this is how the senses interact in how we perceive the world.
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Weighing Up Fat Tax
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-6-11
A 'sin tax' applied to sweetened goods on store shelves is not the most efficient, effective method of lowering caloric intake from sweet food and would be more disruptive to consumers than necessary, according to Iowa State University research.
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Can positive thinking make you well?
cnn.com - 12-6-11
Observers may have noticed recently that mainstream medicine is taking a harder line against positive thinking.
Surveys of the leading research in the field conclude that recovery rates from cancer, for example, are not higher among patients who take a positive attitude about fighting their disease. Studies that show the reverse have been small and, according to their critics, flawed in serious ways.
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Smoking can make your nipples fall off
cnn.com - 12-6-11
I cringe every time I see a patient for a breast lift who is a smoker. I’m deathly afraid that despite my warnings, she will smoke before or after surgery and cause her nipples to turn black and fall off.
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Study Sees Rice as Source of Arsenic Exposure
healthday.com - 12-6-11
New research finds that pregnant women in New Hampshire, which has high levels of arsenic in drinking water in some wells, may also be ingesting arsenic through rice.
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Best Antidepressant May Depend on Patient: Study
healthday.com - 12-6-11
Newer antidepressants seem to be about as effective as one another, a new analysis indicates.
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How Muscle Fatigue Originates in the Head
sciencedaily.com - 12-6-11
Researchers from the University of Zurich have now studied in detail what sportsmen and women know from experience: The head plays a key role in tiring endurance performances. They have discovered a mechanism in the brain that triggers a reduction in muscle performance during tiring activities and ensures that one's own physiological limits are not exceeded. For the first time, the study demonstrates empirically that muscle fatigue and changes in the interaction between neuronal structures are linked.
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Senate vote to defund EPA Corps Wetlands Regulations
goldprospectors.org - 12-6-11
The EPA and Corps have published new regulations expanding the term “Navigable” so it could cover a bird feeder in your back yard. Don’t let the EPA and Corps get away with expanding their own jurisdiction and undermining the limits Congress placed on them by limiting their Jurisdiction to “Navigable Waters” in the Clean Water Act.
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Put down that Diet Coke! Low calorie substitutes might actually fool your body into GAINING weight
dailymail.co.uk - 12-6-11
Low-calorie substitutes in food and drink may actually make dieters pile on the pounds, scientists claim.
Researchers discovered that the taste of fat and sugar gears the body up to expect a high-calorie hit.
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Most kids sensitive to bitterness
upi.com - 12-6-11
Adding a small amount of dip to a serving of vegetables helped some children eat more vegetables, U.S. researchers found.
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Disabled kids marginalized, experts say
upi.com - 12-6-11
Many disabled British children fail to reach their full potential because they continue to be marginalized in schools, health and social care, researchers say.
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Holiday decorations can cause pet injuries
upi.com - 12-5-11
A decorated tree with shiny ornaments and wrapped gifts with shiny ribbons can result in a trip to the veterinarian for Fido or Fluffy, a U.S. expert says.
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Snipping the bud: Prep work is a payday in the marijuana business
bostonherald.com - 12-5-11
In an old, shingled house not far from the center of town, the trim crew hunkered over trays in the living room, snipping away at the strain of the day, Blue Dream. Its pungency knifed the air, like a medley of French roasted coffee beans and roadkill skunk.
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Infant vaccines may work better if given in afternoon
usatoday.com - 12-5-11
As many parents can attest, a rough night may follow when their baby has been to the doctor for their first shots, due to increased fussiness or fever from the immunizations. But a new study suggests that the time of day that the shots are given may make a difference in both sleep and immune response.
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A little-known drug-free treatment can have an amazing effect on Alzheimer's sufferers. So why does a top charity refuse to endorse it?
dailymail.co.uk - 12-5-11
The mortgage was paid off and their children were grown up with families of their own. Retirement held the promise of a new beginning for Ann and Peter Curtis. With the time to finally savour life, there were plans for travel and to enjoy a few rounds of golf.
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Plasma could cure the common cold
telegraph.co.uk - 12-5-11
Scientists have discovered that a stream of matter known as cold plasma can deactivate viruses similar to those that cause the common cold.
When exposed the plasma – a stream of ionised gas – for just a couple of minutes, the viruses were no longer able to replicate, meaning they could not spread or cause disease.
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People can smell your neuroticism
msnbc.msn.com - 12-5-11
Getting to know someone usually requires at least a little conversation. But a new study suggests you can get a hint of an individual's personality through his or her scent alone.
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Boost your 'good fats' to help fend off diabetes
msnbc.msn.com - 12-5-11
What can I eat? If that's not the first question you ask after a diabetes diagnosis, it's probably a close second.
You figure fruits and vegetables are at the top of the list (they are); lean meats, some fish, and healthy whole grains make the cut too. Those you expect; these you may not: oils, olives, nuts and seeds, avocados, and dark chocolate. These five foods are packed with monounsaturated fatty acids, or MUFAs (moo-fahs) for short.
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Check the mirror: Sickness shows in your face
msnbc.msn.com - 12-5-11
"Our skin can reflect what's going on inside our body," says dermatologist Anne Chapas, M.D., of Union Square Laser Dermatology in New York City. "As part of the immune system, the skin defends against environmental factors. But when your body is fighting an ailment, it can get overwhelmed and things like acne and redness can show up." Here, how to read the signs in the mirror.
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Chicken liver food poisoning link
bbc.co.uk - 12-5-11
Over 90% of cases of a common form of food poisoning seen this year were due to people eating undercooked chicken liver pate, often at weddings, infection experts have said.
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Survey: Some of the riskiest sex in U.S.
upi.com - 12-5-11
U.S. men and women practice some of the riskiest sexual behavior in the world, the Durex Sexual Well Being global survey indicates.
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Spoiling pets can hike vet bills
upi.com - 12-5-11
Putting a fat pet on a diet can do more than save the pet's life -- it can save big money.
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3-D TV Doesn't Raise Seizure Risk for Kids With Epilepsy: Study
healthday.com - 12-5-11
Children with epilepsy do not appear to face an increased risk for seizures while watching 3-D TV, a new German-Austrian study suggests.
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More Evidence Links Specific Genes to ADHD
healthday.com - 12-5-11
Variations in genes involved in brain signaling pathways appear to be linked to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a new study.
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Rare Seizure Disorder Gives Clues About Brain's Laughter Center
healthday.com - 12-5-11
A region of the brain known as the hypothalamus may be responsible for laughter, new research suggests.
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‘Waste' cited in health spending
mysanantonio.com - 12-4-11
The official in charge of Medicare and Medicaid for the last 17 months says 20 to 30 percent of health spending is “waste” that yields no benefit to patients, and that some of the needless spending is a result of onerous, archaic regulations enforced by his agency.
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Clogged arteries pose different dangers for men, women
usatoday.com - 12-4-11
Not all clogged arteries are created equal, with women and men facing different heart risks even when they have the same amount of coronary plaque, a new study suggests.
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Men's thoughts about sex may not be as frequent as we think
latimes.com - 12-4-11
Men think about sex, but not nearly as often as most people may believe, a study finds. They also think a lot about food and sleep, too.
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Prozac Might Ease Repetitive Behaviors in Some Adults With Autism
healthday.com - 12-4-11
The antidepressant Prozac may help ease repetitive behaviors in some adults with autism, a new study indicates.
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Study: Women are the ultimate multitaskers
upi.com - 12-4-11
Women are the ultimate multitaskers, Israeli and U.S. researchers say, and the emotional experience of multitasking is very different for mothers and fathers.
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Cancer fears over 50,000 women in Britain who have had breast implant surgery
dailymail.co.uk - 12-4-11
Tens of thousands of women with breast implants are being urged to have medical check-ups amid fears they are at heightened risk of cancer.
The safety alert follows the death of a French woman who had implants filled with silicone gel believed to have been made for mattresses.
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Epileptic Seizures May Worsen During Menstrual Cycle
healthday.com - 12-4-11
Seizures among women of childbearing age with epilepsy may worsen during menstruation or ovulation, researchers have found.
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Violent video games alter brain function
upi.com - 12-4-11
The brains of young men changed in brain areas associated with cognitive function after one week of violent video game play, U.S. researchers say.
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Vegetables, fruits, reduce stroke risk
upi.com - 12-4-11
Women who ate an antioxidant-rich diet, even those with a previous history of cardiovascular disease, had fewer strokes than others, researchers in Sweden say.
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Dye from lichen may treat Alzheimer's
upi.com - 12-3-11
A red dye from lichens may reduce the abundance of small toxic protein aggregates associated with Alzheimer's disease, researchers in Germany suggest.
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Probiotics help with brain injury outcome
upi.com - 12-3-11
Probiotics, added to nutrients supplied through a feeding tube to a patient with a traumatic brain injury, may improve outcomes, Chinese researchers suggest.
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18 U.S. veterans a day commit suicide
upi.com - 12-3-11
Eighteen U.S. veterans, almost one-third of whom receive care from the Department of Veterans Affairs, commit suicide each day, a member of Congress says.
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Care of British terminally ill questioned
upi.com - 12-3-11
Many families in Britain aren't told their terminally ill loved ones are on a "death pathway" with fluids and drugs withheld in their final days, experts said.
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Stress hormone acts differently in babies
upi.com - 12-3-11
The stress hormone cortisol is stable for 30 minutes from the time an infant wakes while adults experience an immediate increase, U.S. researchers say.
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Driving Stoned: Safer Than Driving Drunk?
abcnews.go.com - 12-3-11
Drivers who get behind the wheel stoned instead of drunk may actually be making the roads safer in states that allow medical marijuana, according to new research.
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Leading doctors warn of liver failure epidemic in young adults as cases soar
dailymail.co.uk - 12-3-11
Consultants have called on the Government to introduce new curbs on alcohol advertising to protect young people.
In an open letter they warned Britain is facing an epidemic of liver disease caused by a binge drinking culture and cheap booze.
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4 natural food cures: Eat your way to good health
msnbc.msn.com - 12-3-11
Alternative medicine is not so alternative these days, as four out of 10 adults are now turning to natural remedies to help with certain health problems. TODAY nutritionist Joy Bauer lets us in on her favorite natural cures. The best part: They're all things you get to eat!
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Exercise Benefits Breast Cancer Survivors, Patients With Lymphedema, Say Researchers
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-3-11
After reviewing published evidence, University of Missouri researchers conclude the benefits of exercise outweigh the risks for breast cancer survivors, including those who develop lymphedema, a chronic swelling that commonly occurs after breast cancer treatment. Co-author Jane Armer, professor in the University's Sinclair School of Nursing, and colleagues, write about their findings in the December 2011 issue of the Journal of Cancer Survivorship.
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Substantial Health Disparities Among Young US Adults
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-3-11
Health disparities among young American adults born after 1980 have grown substantially, according to a new study led by Hui Zheng, assistant professor of sociology at Ohio State University, that is published in the December issue of the American Sociological Review.
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Lung Cancer's Hidden Victims: Those Who Never Smoked
healthday.com - 12-3-11
Opera legend Beverly Sills never smoked. Neither did actress and health advocate Dana Reeve, wife of the late actor Christopher Reeve.
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Colon Cancer Prognosis Worse for the Obese, Type 2 Diabetics
healthday.com - 12-3-11
People who have been diagnosed with colon cancer have a poorer prognosis if they're obese or have type 2 diabetes, new research suggests.
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Age-Old Remedies Using White Tea, Witch Hazel and Rose May Be Beneficial, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 12-3-11
Age-old remedies could hold the key to treating a wide range of serious medical problems, as well as keeping skin firmer and less wrinkled, according to scientists from London's Kingston University. A collaboration between the university and British beauty brand Neal's Yard Remedies has seen experts discover that white tea, witch hazel and the simple rose hold potential health and beauty properties which could be simply too good to ignore.
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First-grade readiness key to later success
upi.com - 12-3-11
The level of school readiness as first-graders begin school helps predict their educational outcomes as they approach middle school, U.S. researchers say.
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High blood sugar 'speeds up ageing'
telegraph.co.uk - 12-3-11
People whose blood sugar levels are higher than average look older than those with low levels, experts said.
Blood sugar, which can rise as a result of an unhealthy diet or lack of exercise, was already known to cause ill health but the study is believed to be the first to link high levels to appearance.
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Canadians back away from free MD care
upi.com - 12-3-11
Despite no-cost medical checkups, fewer Canadians are going for annual physicals, a poll published in Toronto showed Thursday.
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2M Californians need mental health help
upi.com - 12-3-11
One-in-12 Californians report symptoms consistent with serious psychological distress and experience difficulty functioning at work or at home, researchers say.
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Grape tomatoes in salmonella recall
upi.com - 12-3-11
A St. Louis company says it is voluntarily recalling grape tomatoes supplied by a Texas grower because of possible contamination with salmonella.
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Paper wasps can recognize each other’s faces at a glance
io9.com - 12-2-11
In terms of popularity, wasps sit somewhere between house centipedes and mosquitos in regards to universal desire for their demise — so the prospect that they can identify faces is pretty horrifying. According to new research, certain species of wasp can tell one another apart based on faces, which only convinces me further that they can recognize me at a distance, and plan their attacks on me personally.
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Legalizing marijuana could reduce traffic fatalities
io9.com - 12-2-11
On the fence about legalizing marijuana? If so, consider this: legalizing weed could save your life. In the most comprehensive study of its kind ever conducted, the Institute for the Study of Labor has revealed in a provisional discussion paper that the legalization of medical marijuana in the United States is linked to a dramatic decrease in traffic fatalities.
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Beyond chickens and bees: Urban farmers try goats
usatoday.com - 12-2-11
Urban goat farming is part of a nationwide movement to eat food produced locally — sometimes as locally as our backyards. Successful efforts to legalize chickens in cities such as Chicago and New York paved the way, with ducks and bees gaining ground in many places too.
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The cryptic solution: A puzzle a day really can keep dementia away
dailymail.co.uk - 12-2-11
Just two hours a day spent keeping the mind and body busy is as effective at warding off dementia as drug treatment, research reveals.
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Why mothers-to-be should avoid a high street coffee to protect their unborn baby
dailymail.co.uk - 12-2-11
Pregnant women could unwittingly be putting the health of their unborn baby at risk by drinking coffee from high street cafes, researchers warn.
An analysis of espressos from 20 coffee shops uncovered huge variations in the amount of caffeine they contain – with the strongest having more than six times as much as the weakest.
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Why some see the face of Jesus in their toast
msnbc.msn.com - 12-2-11
You might have scratched your head in wonderment when a 10-year-old cheese sandwich sold at auction for a cool $28,000 simply because people thought they saw the face of the Virgin Mary in the folds of the stale food.
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Cursing Relieves Pain, But Not If Over-Used
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-2-11
Cursing can provide effective, short-term pain relief say researchers, but not if over-used: the effect is much greater for people who do not make a habit of it. Richard Stephens and Claudia Umland from the School of Psychology at the University of Keele in the UK, report findings that shed new light on the use of swearing as a response to pain in the 14 November online issue of The Journal of Pain.
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China elderly facing HIV/AIDS crisis
cnn.com - 12-2-11
When an old widower from the central Chinese city of Wuhan went into hospital last summer because of a persistent high fever, he was diagnosed with the AIDS virus -- and made national news.
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Circle of Friends Key to Adopting Healthy Habits: Study
healthday.com - 12-2-11
Interested in adopting healthier habits? You have a better chance of success if you find a friend with similar traits to share the experience, a new study suggests.
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Ravens Gesture With Beaks Just Like Humans Use Hands
healthday.com - 12-2-11
A new study says ravens use their beaks to point out and hold up objects to attract the attention of other ravens, a behavior so far observed only in humans and great apes.
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Eating Fish Reduces Risk of Alzheimer's Disease, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 12-2-11
People who eat baked or broiled fish on a weekly basis may be improving their brain health and reducing their risk of developing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease, according to a study presented November 30 at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).
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Group says Quorn fake meat may cause illness
upi.com - 12-2-11
The Quorn line of meat substitutes causes gastrointestinal distress and may even cause a life-threatening allergic reaction, a U.S. non-profit group says.
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Contact wearers ignore care guidelines
upi.com - 12-2-11
Most people who wear contact lenses perceive themselves as following standard guidelines but very few actually do, U.S. researchers say.
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Annie Murphy Paul: What we learn before we're born - TED Talk video (16:46)
ted.com - 12-2-11
Pop quiz: When does learning begin? Answer: Before we are born. Science writer Annie Murphy Paul talks through new research that shows how much we learn in the womb -- from the lilt of our native language to our soon-to-be-favorite foods.
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Study: Apple a day may keep colitis at bay
upi.com - 12-1-11
U.S. researchers say anti-inflammatory polyphenols in apple peels could lead to treatments for disorders related to bowel inflammation, such as colitis.
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St. Petersburg, Fla., is saddest U.S. city
upi.com - 12-1-11
St. Petersburg, Fla., once soaked up a record 768 straight days of sun, but Men's Health magazine ranks it as America's Saddest City.
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Stress hormone may help predict PTSD
upi.com - 12-1-11
Cadets whose stress hormone cortisol increased the most at waking were more likely to show stress symptoms later as police officers, U.S. researchers say.
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2 Governors Asking U.S. to Ease Rules on Marijuana to Allow for Its Medical Use
nytimes.com - 12-1-11
The governors of Washington and Rhode Island petitioned the federal government on Wednesday to reclassify marijuana as a drug with accepted medical uses, saying the change is needed so states like theirs, which have decriminalized marijuana for medical purposes, can regulate the safe distribution of the drug without risking federal prosecution.
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Horses could soon be slaughtered for meat in U.S.
usatoday.com - 12-1-11
Congress has lifted a de facto ban on the slaughter of horses, a move hailed by Missouri farmers and state political leaders who say the prohibition had inadvertently caused more harm to the animals than good.
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One man and his shed: Why the humble garden retreat could help men live longer
dailymail.co.uk - 12-1-11
It's long been cherished by men as a refuge to get on with some DIY, tackle a crossword, or even just for some peace and quiet away from the family.
But now it would seem the humble garden shed has an even more valuable role - it could actually help men live longer, according to a health expert.
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Blood Test Detects Parkinson's Long Before Symptoms
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-1-11
A study led by the School of Health and Medicine at the University of Lancaster in the UK suggests it may be possible to detect Parkinson's disease in the early stages, long before external symptoms emerge, with a simple blood test that looks for a marker called phosphorylated alpha-synuclein. A report on the study appears in the December issue of the FASEB Journal.
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Creative Thinkers Can Be Less Honest, Study
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-1-11
New research from the US suggests that creative or original thinkers can be less honest and may be more likely to cheat than less creative people, perhaps because they are better able to invent excuses to "explain" their actions. Lead researcher Dr Francesca Gino of Harvard University, and co-author Dr Dan Ariely, of Duke University, write about their findings in the 28 November online issue of Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, a publication of the American Psychological Association.
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HIV/AIDS Rising Rapidly In China's General Population
medicalnewstoday.com - 12-1-11
Rates of HIV/AIDS are rising rapidly in China's general population, according to new figures released on Wednesday by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which reveals the largest increases in recent years to be among older people and college students, due to unsafe sexual intercourse.
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Youth attempt suicide sooner than thought
upi.com - 12-1-11
About one in nine people attempt suicide by the time they graduate from high school, U.S. researchers say.
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Health insurance passes cost to consumers
upi.com - 12-1-11
Protecting the status quo of U.S. healthcare results in costs increasing unless innovative solutions are applied to federal health programs, an expert says.
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Self-Monitoring of Blood Thinner May Halve Clot Risk
healthday.com - 12-1-11
People taking the blood-thinning drug warfarin who monitor their own blood and adjust their dosage can reduce the risk of blood clots by half, British researchers report.
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Arsenic Detected in Apple, Grape Juice Samples
healthday.com - 12-1-11
The debate over the safety of fruit juice consumed by Americans escalated Wednesday with the release of a Consumer Reports study that found many apple and grape juice samples tainted with arsenic.
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Most U.S. Drivers Engage in 'Distracting' Behaviors: Poll
healthday.com - 12-1-11
Whether it's talking on cellphones, fiddling with food and drink or doing some last-minute grooming, a large majority of adult drivers in the United States admit to being dangerously distracted while behind the wheel, a new poll shows.
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Non-Fried Fish Might Help Ward Off Alzheimer's: Study
healthday.com - 12-1-11
Eating baked or broiled fish as little as once a week may boost brain health and lower the risk for mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, new brain scan research suggests.
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Psychopaths' Brains Show Differences in Structure and Function
sciencedaily.com - 12-1-11
Images of prisoners' brains show important differences between those who are diagnosed as psychopaths and those who aren't, according to a new study led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers. This study found reduced connectivity between an area of prefrontal cortex (PFC, red) and the amygdala (blue). The white matter pathway connecting the two structures (the uncinate fasciculus) is shown in green.
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Sugar-Sweetened Beverages May Increase Cardiovascular Risk in Women, Research Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 12-1-11
Drinking two or more sugar-sweetened beverages a day may expand a woman's waistline and increase her risk of heart disease and diabetes, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011.
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New Study Shows U.S. Government Fails to Oversee Treatment of Foster Children With Mind-Altering Drugs
abcnews.go.com - 12-1-11
The federal government has not done enough to oversee the treatment of America's foster children with powerful mind-altering drugs, according to a Government Accountability Office (GAO) report to be released Thursday.
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