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October, 2011 - Herbal and Health News

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Concerns Are Raised About Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes
nytimes.com - 10-31-11
These mosquitoes are genetically engineered to kill — their own children.
Researchers on Sunday reported initial signs of success from the first release into the environment of mosquitoes engineered to pass a lethal gene to their offspring, killing them before they reach adulthood.
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Halloween haul: 3,500 to 7,000 calories
upi.com - 10-31-11
The average U.S. child collects between 3,500 and 7,000 calories from candy on Halloween night, a public heath expert estimates.
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Insight: Firms to charge smokers, obese more for healthcare
reuters.com - 10-31-11
Like a lot of companies, Veridian Credit Union wants its employees to be healthier. In January, the Waterloo, Iowa-company rolled out a wellness program and voluntary screenings.
It also gave workers a mandate - quit smoking, curb obesity, or you'll be paying higher healthcare costs in 2013. It doesn't yet know by how much, but one thing's for certain - the unhealthy will pay more.
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Head lice seek a real blood meal
upi.com - 10-31-11
Halloween may call for scary delight, but parents may be scared getting a note from school saying lice were detected, a U.S. infectious disease expert says.
"While the make-believe vampires are prowling for candy, head lice are looking for a real blood meal," Dr. Andrew Bonwit, a pediatric infectious disease expert at Loyola University Health System near Chicago, said in a statement. "Lice grip the hair shaft while biting into the scalp to feed on blood."
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Medical Marijuana Crackdown Should Stop, House Reps Say
huffingtonpost.com - 10-31-11
Members of Congress are calling on the Obama administration to end the federal crackdown on marijuana dispensaries in California, citing Attorney General Eric Holder's past promise to maintain a hands-off approach toward pot clinics operating in compliance with state law.
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Study: Asthma drugs raise risk of complications in children
usatoday.com - 10-31-11
When used alone, the asthma medications known as long-acting beta-agonists are associated with an increased risk of serious complications, new research indicates.
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Death by a thousand needles: The debilitating condition that leaves sensitive sufferers in excruciating pain
dailymail.co.uk - 10-31-11
It is a chronic condition that renders sufferers so sensitive that even the lightest touch triggers waves of excruciating pain. Fibromyalgia is thought to affect up to a million Britons, commonly women over 40, and experts have likened the debilitating sensations to ‘death by a thousand needles’.
Other symptoms include lack of concentration, memory loss, headaches and muscle stiffness. And for a long time there was little doctors could do to help quell the agony.
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Beyond blueberries: 8 unexpected antioxidants
msnbc.msn.com - 10-31-11
When scientists first discovered the power of antioxidants to destroy cell-damaging free radicals, the hunt was on.
They knew these preventers of cancer and heart disease were in colorful fruits and vegetables and nuts, but recently researchers have uncovered them in new, unexpected places. “The number and variety of these kamikaze substances we find in foods continue to grow,” says Christine Gerbstadt, MD, RD, of the American Dietetic Association.
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Research Could Pave The Way For Preventative Measures To Tackle Gum Disease
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-31-11
Normal bacteria which live in our mouths provide the catalyst for the development of gum disease, a debilitating condition which leads to painful gums and the loosening of teeth, new research from Queen Mary, University of London has found.
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Mortality gives life meaning
cnn.com - 10-31-11
Humans have a self-preservation instinct, a natural drive to survive. But we also have an awareness that there will come a day when all of those efforts will fail, and we will die.
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Pill 'lowers ovarian cancer risk'
bbc.co.uk - 10-31-11
Women who take the Pill for 10 years almost halve their risk of ovarian cancer, according to a study.
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'Fatty apron' fuels ovary cancer
bbc.co.uk - 10-31-11
A "fatty apron" in the abdomen helps fuel the spread of ovarian cancer, research suggests.
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Glaucoma Experts Eye Benefits of Exercise
healthday.com - 10-31-11
A physically active lifestyle may help protect your eyes from glaucoma, according to a new study.
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Fertility Chip Measures Concentration and Motility of Sperm
sciencedaily.com - 10-31-11
Loes Segerink, a researcher at the University of Twente has developed a "fertility chip" that can accurately count sperm and measure their motility. The chip can be inserted into a compact device for one-off use. A home test kit will soon make it possible for men to test their sperm in a familiar environment. As a result, there is a greater chance of obtaining a correct diagnosis, also the method is simple and inexpensive. Segerink's doctoral defence will take place on 4 November 2011.
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People willing to pay for pet health
upi.com - 10-31-11
America's millions of pet lovers apparently aren't too worried about the threat of a double-dip recession.
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Sexsomnia: It sounds absurd but growing numbers of men claim to suffer from a syndrome that makes them try to have sex while asleep - can it be genuine?
dailymail.co.uk - 10-30-11
Things tend to start with a gentle brushing of her leg then, within seconds, his hands are everywhere. It’s at this point Anita Sayer surfaces from her sleep with a groan.
‘Not again,’ she thinks, as she pushes her persistent husband forcefully to the other side of the bed. This scenario can happen up to three times a night leaving Anita feeling both annoyed and exhausted.
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Kellogg's adds vitamin D to fight rickets after alarming rise in the condition
dailymail.co.uk - 10-30-11
Kellogg’s is adding vitamin D to all of its children’s cereals in response to an alarming resurgence of rickets.
The food giant hopes the move will ‘help avoid’ the bone-softening condition, which can cause youngsters to develop bowed legs.
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Medical Marijuana Dispensary in Oakland Is Focus of Federal Government
nytimes.com - 10-30-11
Richard Lee, the leader of the marijuana legalization movement in California, does not appear to be intimidated by the federal government’s crackdown on medical marijuana dispensaries.
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A jolt to the penis may cure impotence, study says
msnbc.msn.com - 10-30-11
In case you had any doubts — and how could you after all those football-through-the-tire, middle-aged-men-channeling-Elvis, kitchens-turning-into-rainforests commercials — men value their erections.
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Experts Offer 'Lucky 13' Tips for Safe and Healthy Halloween
healthday.com - 10-30-11
From decorative contact lenses to face paint, experts warn that Halloween costumes may result in a wide array of potentially serious health issues from falls to allergic reactions.
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Practice Doesn't Always Make Perfect, Study Suggests
healthday.com - 10-30-11
Practice is an essential part of gaining excellence in a specific skill, but to become truly great other qualities must come into play, such as IQ or working memory, according to researchers who studied how practice affects the success of chess players.
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USDA revises meat temp recommendation
upi.com - 10-29-11
The U.S. Department of Agriculture has revised its recommended cooking temperature for pork and other red meat.
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Synthetic Marijuana Death: Double Lung Transplant Recipient, 13, Dies After Smoking Fake Pot
huffingtonpost.com - 10-29-11
A Pennsylvania eighth-grader who became ill after smoking synthetic marijuana and had a double lung transplant has died.
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Babies 'should sleep in mother's bed until age three'
telegraph.co.uk - 10-29-11
The suggestion, which goes against health warnings, suggests that babies' hearts are under more stress if they are left to sleep on their own.
It claims that sleeping on their mother's chest provides young babies with a better rest than being put in a cot for the night.
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Why you can't hear me now on your cell phone
msnbc.msn.com - 10-29-11
On a bus or in a bar, cell phone conversations can lead to major frustration. But it's not just volume or poor reception that makes it so hard to hear the person on the other end of the line, according to a new study.
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Most Strokes Preventable, 1 In 6 Of Us Will Have One
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-29-11
The "One in Six" motto of this year's World Stroke Day on October 29 is an apt reminder that one in six people will suffer a stroke at some point during their life and that someone dies from a stroke every 6 seconds. The World Stroke Organization (WSO) points out that the victims consist of ordinary people who live everyday lives, however, 85% of these people have risk factors that can prevent a stroke if identified.
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Friendly Gut Bacteria May Trigger MS
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-29-11
In an astonishing new study published in Nature today, researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried in Munich, Germany say they have found evidence that suggests multiple sclerosis (MS) is triggered by natural intestinal flora, the so-called friendly bacteria that reside in the gut. They found genetically engineered mice with normal gut bacteria developed brain inflammation similar to MS in humans. They say the bacteria first activated the immune T-cells, then the B-cells, which resulted in an attack on the myelin layer in the brain. The same could happen in humans with a corresponding genetic predisposition, they say.
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Obesity linked to surgery complications
upi.com - 10-29-11
Obese women who have elective breast surgery are at substantially higher risk than others of complications after the procedure, U.S. plastic surgeons say.
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Changing child diet helps adult health
upi.com - 10-29-11
Lowering fat and increasing dietary fiber consumption in childhood results in lower glucose levels and lower blood pressure in adulthood, U.S. researchers say.
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A U.S. adult has a stroke every 40 seconds
upi.com - 10-29-11
Someone in the world dies from stroke every 6 seconds, and someone has a stroke every 40 seconds in the United States, federal health officials say.
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Testosterone linked to muscle retention
upi.com - 10-29-11
Higher testosterone levels are associated with reduced loss of lean muscle mass in older men, especially those losing weight, U.S. researchers say.
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Watermelon may reduce atherosclerosis
upi.com - 10-29-11
A study using animals found watermelon reduced atherosclerosis -- hardening of the arteries, U.S. researchers say.
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Experts Design 'Toolkit' to Help Spot Teens With Mental Health Issues
healthday.com - 10-29-11
Because many adolescents with mental health problems are never diagnosed and treated, an expert team has come up with a "toolkit" aimed at identifying those kids and getting them the right help.
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Stress Linked to Higher Mortality Risk Among Men
healthday.com - 10-29-11
Men who consistently experience more than two stressful life events each year over an extended time period have a 50 percent higher mortality rate than their less-stressed peers, according to a new study.
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Ovarian tumors may develop years after fertility therapy
usatoday.com - 10-28-11
Women who undergo ovarian stimulation to produce extra eggs for in-vitro fertilization (IVF) are at increased risk for a type of growth known as "borderline ovarian tumors," new research suggests.
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Chemotherapy via the nipple most effective way to treat breast cancer says study
dailymail.co.uk - 10-28-11
Administering chemotherapy via the nipple is the most effective way of treating breast cancer according to scientists.
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British Breed Super Brocolli Beneforté
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-28-11
British experts on plant biology, nutrition and health have developed a super brocolli called Beneforté that contains higher levels of glucoraphanin, a natural nutrient that has been linked to lower rates of heart disease and some cancers and also boosts the body's supply of antioxidant enzymes.
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Study Confirms Suspected Fungus Causes Deadly Bat Disease
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-28-11
A new study carried out at the US Geological Survey (USGS) National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, provides the first direct evidence that the appropriately named fungus Geomyces destructans does cause white-nose syndrome (WNS), a deadly disease that is spreading fast and decimating bat populations in North America.
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Don't get hurt by an MRI
cnn.com - 10-28-11
MRI machines allow doctors to see inside your body and diagnose what’s wrong with you, but if mistakes are made, they can hurt or even kill you.
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More Evidence Shows Newer Forms of 'Pill' Raise Clot Risk, FDA Says
healthday.com - 10-28-11
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday said it "remains concerned" that a newer generation of birth control pills may raise the odds for serious blood clots more than older forms of the Pill.
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Daily Aspirin May Help Prevent Colon Cancer for Those at High Risk
healthday.com - 10-28-11
Two aspirin a day may cut the risk of colon cancer by more than half in people who are predisposed to these types of tumors, new research suggests.
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Dreams read by brain scanner for the first time
newscientist.com - 10-28-11
The secret world of dreams could soon be cracked open. Innovative neuroscientists have already begun to figure out the thoughts of awake people – now, a team reckon they can use similar methods to tap into dreams.
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Demand Public Officials End Smart Meters
ppjg.wordpress.com - 10-28-11
CPUC officials have violated their Oath of Office, endangered public health and violated federal wiretapping laws by failing to protect the public from Smart Meters. Therefore, the CPUC is vulnerable to a lawsuit. The individual Commissioners of the CPUC and Judge Wong may be held personally accountable in a lawsuit for damages caused by Smart Meters.
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Chicago may decriminalize marijuana
breitbart.com - 10-28-11
Chicago pot smokers may soon be able to light up without fear of jail time.
Several Windy City councilmen said Thursday they plan to introduce a local law that would decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana in order to cut costs and free up police to handle more serious crimes.
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Medical marijuana advocates sue prosecutors over crackdown
latimes.com - 10-28-11
A medical marijuana advocacy group has sued the U.S. attorney general and the top federal prosecutor in Northern California, asking a federal court to halt recent raids and threats of prosecution that have significantly stepped up the Obama administration’s assault on the state’s 15-year-old program.
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Diet, fish oil may slow prostate cancer
upi.com - 10-28-11
U.S. researchers suggest prostate cancer patients who change to a low-fat diet with fish oil supplements may slow prostate cancer cell growth.
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Men not exempt from binge eating
upi.com - 10-28-11
Binge eating is a disorder that affects both men and women, but men are underrepresented in research, U.S. researchers say.
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Colorado issues first medical-marijuana business licenses in U.S.
denverpost.com - 10-28-11
Colorado has begun issuing the first state medical-marijuana business licenses in the nation, the culmination of a more than year-long application process for dispensaries and marijuana- infused-products makers.
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Top Justice official who wrote medical marijuana memo is mum on feds’ cannabis crackdown
washingtonpost.com - 10-28-11
A high-ranking U.S. Justice Department official who wrote a memo saying state medical marijuana laws do not provide immunity from federal prosecution refused to say Wednesday whether a recent crackdown in California signals a shift in federal policy that may result in a crackdown in other states.
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Soda a day = eating 50 pounds of sugar/yr
upi.com - 10-27-11
Drinking just one 20-ounce soda a day translates to eating 50 pounds of sugar a year, a New York City health department public education campaign says.
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Party drug meow meow kills one young Briton a week
dailymail.co.uk - 10-27-11
At least one person a week dies after taking the dance drug mephedrone, it emerged last night.
Known as ‘meow meow’, it was legal until last April and has been linked to nearly 100 deaths in the past two years.
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Diabetes rises by 50% in five years fuelled by soaring levels of obesity
dailymail.co.uk - 10-27-11
The number of diabetes sufferers in Britain has risen by 50 per cent in just five years, fuelled by soaring levels of obesity, campaigners warn.
Some three million adults and children now have the condition, after an increase of more than 117,000 in the past 12 months alone.
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Private companies decide food safety, says report
msnbc.msn.com - 10-27-11
Thousands of ingredients that go into food have been classified as safe by private industry alone, without any U.S. government oversight, according to a new report published Wednesday.
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Obesity Pill Could Fool Brain To Eat Less
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-27-11
A new imaging study suggests if we were to take a pill based on two simple gut hormones we would eat less because it would fool the brain by signalling we're full even if we're not. The researchers scanned the brains of the same volunteers at two different times: just after they fasted and took a dose of the hormones, and just after they had eaten a meal. Both brain patterns showed reduced activity in the areas known to control appetite.
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How people die from drinking
cnn.com - 10-27-11
As the news that Amy Winehouse died from alcohol poisoning traveled around the world Wednesday, some were shocked to hear exactly how much alcohol the late singer had in her system at the time of her death. According to a pathologist who testified during the inquest, Winehouse's blood-alcohol level was .416 when she died, more than five times the legal limit for driving. In both the United States and Britain, the legal limit to drive is .08.
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'Hunger Hormones' May Drive Post-Dieting Weight Gain
healthday.com - 10-27-11
Overweight people who diet and successfully shed pounds only to gain the weight back again within a year can blame their hunger hormones, new research suggests.
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Science Probes How Probiotic Yogurts Affect Your Gut
healthday.com - 10-27-11
Researchers have put the health promises of popular probiotic yogurts to the test and found they may alter the way in which food is metabolized.
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Links to Mental Illness Seen in Fetal Brains: Study
healthday.com - 10-27-11
The genes suspected of causing autism, schizophrenia and other mental illnesses are activated in the developing brain before birth, according to a major genetic analysis.
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Autistic Brains Develop More Slowly Than Healthy Brains, Researchers Say
sciencedaily.com - 10-27-11
Researchers at UCLA have found a possible explanation for why autistic children act and think differently than their peers. For the first time, they've shown that the connections between brain regions that are important for language and social skills grow much more slowly in boys with autism than in non-autistic children.
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15 minutes of exercise burns one 'treat'
upi.com - 10-27-11
People who indulge in Halloween candy can burn off calories and have fun, or even be productive, at the same time, a U.S. non-profit fitness organization says.
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Study: Flu Shots Are Only About 59% Effective In Adults
philadelphia.cbslocal.com - 10-27-11
If you’re somebody who likes medicine to be perfect, you are not going to be happy by a report in the journal The Lancet. The report looked at flu vaccine and finds it’s only about 59-percent effective in adults who receive the shot.
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Exercise may reduce risk of glaucoma
upi.com - 10-27-11
Higher levels of physical exercise may have a long-term beneficial impact on low ocular perfusion pressure, a risk factor for glaucoma, British researchers say..
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Flu vaccine not as effective in obese
upi.com - 10-27-11
The influenza vaccine may not be as effective for those who are obese as it is for others, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers suggest..
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Medical Marijuana Advocates Protest Obama's San Francisco Visit
huffingtonpost.com - 10-27-11
Hundreds of marijuana advocates gathered in downtown San Francisco Tuesday to protest recent federal crackdowns on California's medical cannabis industry while President Obama attended a fundraising luncheon at the nearby W Hotel.
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Where The Marijuana Grows: Feds Target Landowners
npr.org - 10-27-11
Federal authorities are cracking down on medical marijuana in California.
In the Central Valley, the nation's most productive farm belt, pot is becoming a more lucrative crop than almonds and grapes. The feds say much of what's grown as "medical marijuana" is actually sold on the black market.
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Study: Corporal punishment leads to lying
upi.com - 10-26-11
Corporal punishment, or harsh discipline, results in children who are more effective liars to hide their misbehavior, researchers in Canada said.
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Could taking anti-depressants during pregnancy make your child autistic?
dailymail.co.uk - 10-26-11
Women who take a certain type of anti-depressant during pregnancy could be contributing to a dramatic rise in the number of children with autism, say scientists.
They found in a study of rats, that newborns given a drug known as an SSRI, which targets the 'happy hormone' serotonin, showed brain abnormalities and behaviour typical of the developmental disorder.
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Blood Pressure Meds At Bedtime Rather Than The Morning Reduces Risks
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-26-11
Taking blood pressure medication at bedtime rather than first thing in the morning is not only better for keeping blood pressure under control but it also appears to reduce the risk of heart conditions such as strokes and heart attacks by a significant amount, say Spanish researchers who write about their findings in the 24 October online before print issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.
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Mediterranean diet tied to better fertility
msnbc.msn.com - 10-26-11
Women who eat a Mediterranean-style diet -- high in fruits, vegetables, fish and whole grains -- are less likely to have trouble getting pregnant, hints a new study from Spain.
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Gas Pump Handles, ATMs Among Dirtiest, Germ-Ridden Surfaces
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-26-11
What do gas pump handles, ATM buttons, mailbox handles and escalator rails have in common in the USA? As the flu season approaches, you may wish make a note of this: they are amongst the most germ-ridden and dirtiest surfaces that Americans touch every day, according to tests carried out in six US major cities recently. The results of the tests were announced to the press earlier today, Tuesday 25 October.
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Steve Jobs: A difficult patient
cnn.com - 10-26-11
All those vague statements about his health that Steve Jobs put out in the last few years caused endless speculation, as the world tried to read into what could really be going on.
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Pot Can Mimic Brain Changes Seen in Schizophrenia
healthday.com - 10-26-11
Marijuana causes disruptions in concentration and memory similar to those that occur in people with schizophrenia, according to a new study.
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U.S. Health Officials Back HPV Vaccine for Boys
healthday.com - 10-26-11
U.S. health authorities on Tuesday recommended that young males be vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted virus that causes most cervical cancers, as well as anal cancer and some cancers of the throat and mouth.
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'Junk DNA' Defines Differences Between Humans and Chimps
sciencedaily.com - 10-26-11
For years, scientists believed the vast phenotypic differences between humans and chimpanzees would be easily explained -- the two species must have significantly different genetic makeups. However, when their genomes were later sequenced, researchers were surprised to learn that the DNA sequences of human and chimpanzee genes are nearly identical. What then is responsible for the many morphological and behavioral differences between the two species?
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Unraveling the Mysteries of the Natural Killer Within Us
sciencedaily.com - 10-26-11
Scientists have discovered more about the intricacies of the immune system in a breakthrough that may help combat viral infections such as HIV.
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U.S. decides on anthrax vaccine for kids
upi.com - 10-26-11
The Obama administration is deciding whether U.S. children should be tested for an anthrax vaccine against a bioterrorism attack, officials say.
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Sex, intimacy often ignored after cancer
upi.com - 10-26-11
Sex and intimacy after cancer treatment are often ignored, a Florida certified sexuality counselor, healthcare educator and cancer survivor suggests.
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Motherhood changes brain function
upi.com - 10-26-11
Motherhood is associated with a host of new behaviors that are driven, at least in part, by alterations in brain function, researchers in Israel say.
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Silicone to boost buttocks can be deadly
upi.com - 10-25-11
Legitimate use of liquid silicone injections in plastic surgery is rare, and U.S. emergency room physicians say the illegal use of the substance can be deadly.
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Daily smoking linked to depression
upi.com - 10-25-11
Previous depression, smoking and a lack of control over life circumstances are risk factors for repeat episodes of depression, Canadian researchers say.
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Bath salt poisoning incidents soar
upi.com - 10-25-11
Bath salt poisoning incidents treated in hospitals increased from 302 for all of last year to 1,782 since January, U.S. researcher say.
Bath salts are not the salts people use to take a bath with, but a relatively new recreational drug that gets its name from its crystal form, similar to traditional bath salts. They are typically snorted, injected or smoked.
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Baby boomers worry about losing vision
upi.com - 10-25-11
Almost as many baby boomers say they worry about losing their vision as having heart disease or cancer, a U.S. survey indicates.
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Sunbathing 'in the morning can REDUCE the risk of skin cancer'
dailymail.co.uk - 10-25-11
Enjoying the sunshine before lunch could actually reduce the risk of skin cancer, according to scientists.
A team from North Carolina University have discovered that a protein which protects the body against harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays is strongest in the morning and declines throughout the day.
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Just one can of fizzy drink a day will make teenagers behave more aggressively
dailymail.co.uk - 10-25-11
Just one can of fizzy drink a day is linked to more aggressive behaviour by teenagers, claim researchers.
A new study found youngsters were significantly more likely to be violent and carry weapons if they regularly consumed fizzy soft drinks.
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Stuffed olives may hold key to beating heartburn misery
dailymail.co.uk - 10-25-11
A compound used to make stuffed olives could be a treatment for an extreme form of acid reflux.
Sodium alginate, which occurs naturally in brown algae, is commonly used to ‘glue’ pimento strips into olives.
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'Plump my ride': luxury car makers create bigger cars for fat drivers
telegraph.co.uk - 10-25-11
Typical family cars have become more than a foot wider and almost double the weight over the past 50 years as manufacturers struggle with the world’s obesity crisis.
Consequently some luxury manufacturers have begun road-testing the next generation of larger-sized vehicles.
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Drinking more could cut bladder cancer risk in men
telegraph.co.uk - 10-25-11
A survey of 48,000 men found that those who drank more than 2,531ml of fluids a day – equal to almost four and a half pints – had a 24 per cent lower risk or bladder cancer.
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Sounds gross, works great: Fecal transplants cure nasty C. diff infections
msnbc.msn.com - 10-25-11
After 52 years of marriage, Pat Shoop thought she'd shared every intimacy possible with her husband, Bob.
But that was before she became so ill with a Clostridium difficile infection last year that doctors suggested that a spousal stool transplant -- yes, a dose of Bob’s feces -- might be the only way to save her life.
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Children's Risk For Nearsightedness May Be Reduced By Spending More Time Outdoors
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-25-11
Children's risk for myopia or nearsightedness, where objects further away look blurred because light entering the eye focuses incorrectly, may be reduced by spending more time outdoors in natural light, according to a new review of research being presented at a conference this week.
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Fearing Stigmatizing The Patient - Doctors Will Cite Alcohol As Cause Of Death, But Not Smoking.
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-25-11
Not wanting to stigmatize the deceased, UK doctors are not in general citing smoking as a cause of death on death certificates, although they will cite alcohol in cases where alcohol is a clear cause.
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Immune system defect may cause ME
bbc.co.uk - 10-25-11
Researchers in Norway believe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), also known as ME, may be caused by a wayward immune system attacking the body.
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Prenatal BPA exposure may affect behavior
upi.com - 10-25-11
Bisphenol A, in canned food linings, plastics, dental sealants and some thermal paper receipts, may affect behavior in girls, U.S. and Canadian researchers say.
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Insomnia Might Boost Heart Attack Risk
healthday.com - 10-25-11
People who have trouble getting a decent night's sleep may also face a higher risk of heart attack, Norwegian researchers report.
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Study Casts Doubt on Hot Dogs' Link to Colon Cancer
healthday.com - 10-25-11
A U.S. government requirement that vitamin C or one of its close relatives be added to hot dogs, to reduce the amount of nitrites found in this popular food, may not have lowered the rate of colon cancer cases after all, a new study suggests.
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Daily Coffee May Lower Your Skin Cancer Risk
healthday.com - 10-25-11
Your morning coffee might do more than jump-start your day. Researchers say that daily caffeine jolt might also reduce your risk of developing a type of skin cancer.
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Yoga Eases Back Pain in Largest U.S. Yoga Study to Date
sciencedaily.com - 10-25-11
Yoga classes were linked to better back-related function and diminished symptoms from chronic low back pain in the largest U.S. randomized controlled trial of yoga to date, published by the Archives of Internal Medicine as an "Online First" article on October 24. But so were intensive stretching classes.
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Did Dropping Acid Make Steve Jobs More Creative?
slate.com - 10-24-11
Apple founder and tech visionary Steve Jobs died on Wednesday. Jobs was heavily influenced by 1960s counterculture, and once told a reporter that taking LSD was “one of the two or three most important things” he did in his life. Can LSD really make you more creative?
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Gallup: Four ways to emotional health
upi.com - 10-24-11
Gallup Poll officials say after studying well-being and aging in America, they have discovered four keys to better emotional health in old age.
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Survey: Trouble walking hardest part of MS
upi.com - 10-24-11
Most people with multiple sclerosis who have difficulty walking say it is the most challenging part of the debilitating disease, U.S. researchers say.
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Obese children as young as 11 to get a gastric implant on the NHS
dailymail.co.uk - 10-24-11
Obese children as young as 11 whose size is endangering their health are to be given gastric balloons on the NHS in a drastic attempt to make them lose weight.
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How to spot psychopaths: Speech patterns give them away
msnbc.msn.com - 10-24-11
Psychopaths are known to be wily and manipulative, but even so, they unconsciously betray themselves, according to scientists who have looked for patterns in convicted murderers' speech as they described their crimes.
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New Instrument Helps Researchers See How Diseases Start and Develop in Minute Detail
sciencedaily.com - 10-24-11
Researchers at Lund University can now study molecules which are normally only found in very small concentrations, directly in organs and tissue. After several years of work, researchers in Lund have managed to construct an instrument that 'hyperpolarises' the molecules and thus makes it possible to track them using MRI. The technology opens up new possibilities to study what really happens on molecular level in organs such as the brain.
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U.S. Atty Defends Marijuana Crackdown
nbclosangeles.com - 10-24-11
Two years after the Department of Justice said it would respect state laws, U.S. attorneys based in California announced a crackdown on medical marijuana dispensaries.
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People willing to pay for pet health
upi.com - 10-24-11
America's millions of pet lovers apparently aren't too worried about the threat of a double-dip recession.
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Healthy Halloween Advice for Children With Diabetes
healthday.com - 10-24-11
While there are challenges, Halloween can still be fun for children with diabetes, an expert says.
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Men funnier by a hair than women
upi.com - 10-23-11
Men are funnier than women, but not by as much as they think -- they're only funnier by a hair and mostly to other men, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Bay Area Pols Slam Feds’ Medical Marijuana Crackdown
hawaiinewsdaily.com - 10-23-11
A pair of Northern California elected officials Wednesday urged the federal government to back off on its "senseless assault" on medical marijuana dispensaries. At the same time, they said they want to meet with federal officials to see what's behind the crackdown.
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'Bath salts' chemical banned in U.S.
msnbc.msn.com - 10-23-11
U.S. authorities on Friday issued a temporary ban on chemicals used in a new type of street drug known as "bath salts" that is increasingly popular among teens.
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Dimethyl Fumarate Considerably Reduces MS Relapses And Disability Progression
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-23-11
240 mg of Dimethyl Fumarate (BG-12) taken orally two or three times a day showed reduced relapses by about half in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (PRMS) compared to those on placebo, Biogen Idec announced after publishing results from a Phase 3 DEFINE clinical trial. Relapse reduction was 49% for those taking the medication twice a day (BID) and 50% for those on three doses per day (TID) two years after treatment began.
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Surgeon Removes Eight Pound Liver Tumor
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-23-11
The cancerous tumor in Marcus Muhich's liver weighed 8 pounds and was nearly a foot across.
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Doctors say avoid alcohol 3 days a week
upi.com - 10-23-11
British doctors say drinkers should avoid alcohol three days a week to avoid binge drinking cycles and liver disease.
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Study: Music links alcohol, degrading sex
upi.com - 10-23-11
A U.S. adolescent who listens to 2.5 hours of popular music per day is heavily exposed to alcohol brands associated to degrading sex, researchers say.
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Tapping to music enhances hearing
upi.com - 10-23-11
Tapping to the beat of music measurably enriches the listening experience, researchers in Canada found.
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West Nile Virus Transmission Linked to Land Use Patterns and 'Super-Spreaders'
sciencedaily.com - 10-23-11
After its initial appearance in New York in 1999, West Nile virus spread across the United States in just a few years and is now well established throughout North and South America. Both the mosquitoes that transmit it and the birds that are important hosts for the virus are abundant in areas that have been modified by human activities. As a result, transmission of West Nile virus is highest in urbanized and agricultural habitats.
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First Ebola-Like Virus Native to Europe Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 10-23-11
A team of international researchers has discovered a new Ebola-like virus -- Lloviu virus -- in bats from northern Spain. Lloviu virus is the first known filovirus native to Europe, they report in a study published in the journal PLOS Pathogens.
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Can women control when they give birth? Study finds drop in births on Halloween but spike on Valentine's Day
dailymail.co.uk - 10-22-11
Scientists found that births decreased on Halloween compared to a week before and after but increased on Valentine's Day.
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Forget holidays, too much time off is stressful, claim scientists
dailymail.co.uk - 10-22-11
Between family commitments and the pressures of work, few of us feel we get enough 'me' time. But according to researchers, there is one thing that matches the stress of not having enough free time: having too much. Experts from the University of Cincinnati in Ohio and Baylor University in Texas asked 1,329 teenagers how much spare time they had, and how happy they were.
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90pc could reach 90 years with simple steps to health
telegraph.co.uk - 10-22-11
Dr Clyde Yancy, a past president of the American Heart Association (AHA), will say even those already in middle age have an extremely good chance of reaching 90 - or even 100 - if they follow the guidelines.
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'No evidence' mobiles cause cancer - but others beg to differ
telegraph.co.uk - 10-22-11
A large study of mobile phone users has found no evidence that longer-term users are at an increased risk of developing brain tumours.
However, the Danish study, published in the journal BMJ Open, has been criticised as being "worthless" by fellow academics who say its methods are "seriously flawed".
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GM pigs could provide human organs 'by 2013'
telegraph.co.uk - 10-22-11
A persistent shortage of human organs has led experts to investigate methods of using pigs created with human genes, so that body parts grown in them can be harvested for use in patients without their immune systems rejecting them.
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Unrelenting sex drive may signal deadly rabies
msnbc.msn.com - 10-22-11
A 28-year-old woman in India came to her doctor with an unusual complaint: a sudden and persistent increase in her sex drive. She felt constantly aroused, often with no stimulation at all.
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Signalling Protein VEGF Helps Renew Stem Cells In Common Skin Cancer
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-22-11
New research from Belgium, published in Nature this week, reveals that VEGF, a signalling protein that is known to regulate the formation of new blood vessels, has a dual role in helping cancer cells grow and form tumors in skin squamous cell carcinoma, a common cancer in humans. The study finds that VEGF helps grow a blood supply for the tumor, and it also helps replenish and renew the stem cancer cells that differentiate to become skin cancer cells.
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CDC Tracks Thoughts of Suicide in Adults, State by State
healthland.time.com - 10-22-11
More than 8 million Americans thought seriously about suicide in the previous year, according to a new government survey. More adults who considered suicide lived in the Midwest and West than in other parts of the country.
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Stressful life linked to earlier death
upi.com - 10-22-11
Men with persistently moderate or high levels of stressful events over several years have a 50 percent higher mortality rate than others, U.S. researchers say.
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Study: U.S. healthcare better, still fails
upi.com - 10-22-11
Even though U.S. healthcare has improved in some areas, the country is failing to match the improvement made in other countries, a non-profit group says.
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Exercise helps increase cancer survival
upi.com - 10-22-11
Energy balance -- calories consumed, offset by the number burned -- is gaining attention by U.S. researchers as a way to reduce cancer rates, a surgeon says.
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Lying to oneself may lead to depression
upi.com - 10-22-11
Those who boost self-esteem by telling themselves they've done a great job even when they haven't may end up feeling dejected, U.S. and Asian researchers say.
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Some Kids Respond Better to ADHD Drug Than Others
healthday.com - 10-22-11
Children with specific gene variants respond better to the drug methylphenidate (Ritalin, Concerta), which is widely used to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a new study says.
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Older Drivers More Cautious Than Younger Ones After Surgery
healthday.com - 10-22-11
Older patients drive more safely than younger patients after having outpatient surgery and receiving a short-acting anesthetic, according to a new study.
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Breast Cancer Risk May Rise With High Hormone Levels
healthday.com - 10-22-11
Elevated levels of hormones increase breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women, and as the number of different elevated hormones rises, so does the risk, a new study has found.
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To the Brain, Seeing a Caress Is as Good as Getting One
healthday.com - 10-22-11
Seeing someone else being caressed causes your brain to react as strongly as if you were being caressed, researchers have found.
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Blood-Pressure-Lowering Drug After Stroke Aids Recovery, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 10-22-11
A commonly prescribed blood pressure-lowering medication appears to kick start recovery in the unaffected brain hemisphere after a stroke by boosting blood vessel growth, a new University of Georgia study has found.
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Can Aromatherapy Produce Harmful Indoor Air Pollutants?
sciencedaily.com - 10-22-11
Spas that offer massage therapy using fragrant essential oils, called aromatherapy, may have elevated levels of potentially harmful indoor air pollutants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and ultrafine particles, according to an article in Environmental Engineering Science, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
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Autistic Facial Characteristics Identified
sciencedaily.com - 10-22-11
The face and brain develop in coordination, with each influencing the other, beginning in the embryo and continuing through adolescence. Now, University of Missouri researchers have found distinct differences between the facial characteristics of children with autism compared to those of typically developing children.This knowledge could help researchers understand the origins of autism.
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Alternating Training Improves Motor Learning: Study Suggests Varying Practice Sessions May Benefit People With Motor Disorders
sciencedaily.com - 10-22-11
Learning from one's mistakes may be better than practicing to perfection, according to a study in the Oct. 19 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. The study found that forcing people to switch from a normal walking pattern to an unusual one -- and back again -- made them better able to adjust to the unusual pattern the following day. The findings may help improve therapy for people relearning how to walk following stroke or other injury.
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U.S.: Every hour, 4 people kill themselves
upi.com - 10-21-11
Someone in the United States dies by suicide every 15 minutes, while those in Utah have thoughts of suicide the most, federal health officials said.
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Obama Must Explain His Broken Promise on Medical Marijuana, and Soon
huffingtonpost.com - 10-21-11
This week's news that support for the legalization of marijuana has reached a record high of 50% ought to bother Obama's re-election team a little bit. No, not because pot's more popular than the president, although that really says a lot. The problem, rather, is that Obama's heavily publicized and widely praised promise to respect state medical marijuana laws has recently been shattered into more pieces than the campaign can count.
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Cancer groups release cervical cancer screening guidelines
usatoday.com - 10-21-11
Three leading U.S. cancer groups have proposed new guidelines for cervical cancer testing for women, including when to start screening for sexually active young women, extending intervals between screenings and in some cases, supplementing the traditional Pap test with human papilloma virus (HPV) testing.
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Don't touch! Study confirms your worst fears about public potties
msn.com - 10-21-11
A new study on the germ orgies going down in America’s public restrooms truly puts the “P” in repulsive, repugnant and “Hey, how awesome are my Depends?”
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If you want more sex, be nice!
cnn.com - 10-21-11
Earlier this year, eminent marriage therapist John Gottman released a new book titled "The Science of Trust: Emotional Attunement for Couples." While you may not recognize Gottman by name, you may be aware of his work via Malcolm Gladwell’s book "Blink."
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Cattle truck, hygiene linked to Listeria
upi.com - 10-21-11
A cattle operation truck and hygiene deficiencies at a packing house may account for listeria infection via cantaloupes that killed 25, U.S. officials say.
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Radiation reduces cancer recurrence
upi.com - 10-21-11
A meta-analysis of 10,000 women found radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery reduced the rate of recurrence by half, British researchers say.
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Foreclosure Crisis Threatening Americans' Health: Study
healthday.com - 10-21-11
A new study finds that falling behind on your mortgage payments hurts more than just your finances, as the stress and financial strain that come with the struggle can also harm your physical and psychological health.
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Suicide Rates Vary by Region: CDC
healthday.com - 10-21-11
There's a suicide every 15 minutes in the United States, and for every person who takes his or her own life there are many more who think about, plan or attempt suicide, according to a federal report released Thursday.
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Afraid to Do the Math?
healthday.com - 10-21-11
The key to easing math anxiety may be less about improving calculation skills and more about controlling negative emotions that make it difficult to focus on doing the work, new research suggests.
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Music Aimed at Teens Often Promotes Drinking: Study
healthday.com - 10-21-11
American teens hear a lot of references to alcohol brand names in popular music, a new study finds.
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Age a Big Factor in Prostate Cancer Deaths, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 10-21-11
Contrary to common belief, men age 75 and older are diagnosed with late-stage and more aggressive prostate cancer and thus die from the disease more often than younger men, according to a University of Rochester analysis published online this week in the journal Cancer.
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Low Birthweight Infants Five Times More Likely to Have Autism, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 10-21-11
Autism researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing have found a link between low birthweight and children diagnosed with autism, reporting premature infants are five times more likely to have autism than children born at normal weight.
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Can Breastfeeding Reduce Pain in Preterm Infants?
sciencedaily.com - 10-21-11
Poorly managed pain in the neonatal intensive care unit has serious short- and long-term consequences, causing physiological and behavioral instability in preterm infants and long-term changes in their pain sensitivity, stress arousal systems, and developing brains. In a study published in the November issue of PAIN®, researchers report that breastfeeding during minor procedures mitigated pain in preterm neonates with mature breastfeeding behaviors.
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Marijuana genetics revealed
cbc.ca - 10-20-11
The genetic make-up of marijuana has been mapped out by a group of researchers who hope the information can help both the hemp industry and those who are developing medicines from marijuana.
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What TWO glasses of wine a day can do to your face in ten years
dailymail.co.uk - 10-20-11
Despite the warnings, I never used to worry too much that my lifestyle might one day show on my face. After all, there was always make-up, moisturiser, even a touch of Botox as the years advanced. Surely my guilty habits couldn’t make that much difference to my looks, could they?
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Psychotic rage, despair, low sex drive... how the Pill messes with women's minds
dailymail.co.uk - 10-20-11
Bizarre as it sounds, it was an almost-empty carton of orange juice that nearly put an end to my relationship.
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Men have a ticking biological clock too, says study
telegraph.co.uk - 10-20-11
Analysis of patients at an infertility clinic found that the chances of a man getting his wife pregnant dropped by 7 per cent each year between the ages of 41 and 45, reducing even more sharply among older men.
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Couple married 72 years die holding hands
msnbc.msn.com - 10-20-11
An Iowa couple married for 72 years died holding hands in a Des Moines hospital within 70 minutes of each other last week after a car accident that also injured another couple.
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Dirty equipment blamed for deadly outbreak in cantaloupe
msnbc.msn.com - 10-20-11
Potentially contaminated processing equipment and problems with packing and storage of whole cantaloupes at a Colorado farm likely led to the deadliest listeria outbreak in the United States in 25 years, which has so far claimed 25 lives in a dozen states, federal health regulators said Wednesday.
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5 'bad' foods you should be eating
msnbc.msn.com - 10-20-11
Heidi's Klum's catchphrase -- "One day you're in, and the next day you're out" -- applies as much to food as it does fashion. Over the years, we've all had favorite eats hit the healthy-food blacklist, but thankfully, some of them are making a return. In fact, recent research has not only redeemed once-taboo foods such as steak, eggs (yolks included), and peanut butter but also found that when eaten in moderation, some of them may actually help you conquer the scale.
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Fit 50-Year-Olds As Fit As 20-Year-Olds Who Don't Exercise
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-20-11
It may not be possible to have the body of a 20-year-old at 50, but it is possible for fit 50-year-olds to be as fit as 20-year-olds who don't exercise, according to researchers at the K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim.
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Study finds link between swine flu and stillbirth
bbc.co.uk - 10-20-11
Babies born to mothers who contracted the swine flu virus faced a much greater risk of being stillborn, according to a new study.
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U.S. drivers: More alcohol-related crashes
upi.com - 10-20-11
Alcohol-related fatal motor vehicle U.S. crashes involve fewer drivers with Canadian licenses than drivers with U.S. or Mexican licenses, researchers say.
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Teens' IQ May Fluctuate Over Time: Study

healthday.com - 10-20-11
- 10-20-11
Parents, you may be onto something: A small new study suggests that teens' intelligence, as measured by the IQ test, may fluctuate throughout adolescence.
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U.S. Man Diagnosed With HIV Develops Leprosy
healthday.com - 10-20-11
Ohio doctors report they got a diagnostic surprise when an HIV patient tested positive for the bacterium that causes leprosy.
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Breast Radiation After Lumpectomy Saves Lives: Study
healthday.com - 10-20-11
Women with breast cancer who undergo radiation after a lumpectomy have significantly fewer recurrences and, consequently, greater odds of survival than women who forgo radiation, new research says.
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Pollutants Linked to 450 Percent Increase in Risk of Birth Defects in Rural China
sciencedaily.com - 10-20-11
Pesticides and pollutants are related to a 450 percent increase in the risk of spina bifida and anencephaly in rural China, according to scientists at The University of Texas at Austin and Peking University.
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Clue to Birth Defects in Babies of Mothers With Diabetes
sciencedaily.com - 10-20-11
In a paper published in Diabetologia, a team at Joslin Diabetes Center, headed by Mary R. Loeken, PhD, has identified the enzyme AMP kinase (AMPK) as key to the molecular mechanism that significantly increases the risk of neural tube defects such as spina bifida and some heart defects among babies born to women with diabetes.
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Antibiotics: Killing Off Beneficial Bacteria … for Good?
wired.com - 10-20-11
It’s an accepted concept by now that taking antibiotics in order to quell an infection disrupts the personal microbiome, the population of microorganisms that we all carry around in our guts, and which vastly outnumbers the cells that make up our bodies. That recognition supports our understanding of Clostridium difficile disease — killing the beneficial bacteria allows C. diff room to surge and produce an overload of toxins — as well as the intense interest in establishing a research program that could demonstrate experimentally whether the vast industry producing probiotic products is doing what it purports to do.
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CDC: Antidepressant use skyrocketed in past 20 years
usatoday.com - 10-20-11
The rate of antidepressant use among Americans of all ages increased nearly 400 percent over the last two decades, and 11 percent of Americans aged 12 and older now take antidepressant drugs, according to a federal government report released Wednesday.
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Young women skip meals so they can save calories for drinking
dailymail.co.uk - 10-19-11
Young women are skipping meals so that they can consume more alcohol, according to scientists. The phenomenon dubbed 'drunkorexia' is affecting thousands of female students who are desperate to stay slim, say researchers.
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A glass of wine a day strengthens the bones (but bad news for the boys as beer has no effect)
dailymail.co.uk - 10-19-11
According to a study looking at the relationship between diet and bone density, moderate amounts of the alcoholic beverage can reduce the risk of osteoporosis.
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Liquorice extract could reduce hot flushes in menopausal women
telegraph.co.uk - 10-19-11
For years it has been best known as a sweet treat enjoyed by young children, but liquorice may also help older women cope with the symptoms of the menopause.
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Ginger Root Worth Investigating As Potential Colon Cancer Preventer
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-19-11
Ginger root supplement is worth investigating as a potential strategy for colon cancer prevention, according to a phase II study published in the 11 October issue of Cancer Prevention Research. Researchers from the University of Michigan Medical School and colleagues, found that ginger root supplement reduced levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and other biomarkers of colon inflammation in a select group of patients.
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7 Natural Libido-Boosters (that Are Healthy, Too)
botanical.com - 10-19-11
Everyone knows that the modern lifestyle can wear out the body in numerous ways. But because our culture tends toward prudishness around the topics of sex and reproduction, we often overlook the negative effects our lifestyles have on our sex lives. It should go without saying that a fast-paced lifestyle with bad food, minimal exercise, and persistent stress can be harmful to this aspect of life. And though we like to sweep these problems under the rug, it is important to realize that one’s sex life is interconnected with one’s mental, physical, and spiritual health. A health plan that does not take sex and libido into account is incomplete.
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Yoga: the zooming business of Zen
cnn.com - 10-19-11
For millions of Americans, yoga and Pilates keep the body toned and the mind on an even keel. For some, yoga and Pilates are also great business.
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'Educational TV' for Babies? It Doesn't Exist
time.com - 10-19-11
If there was any doubt that television is not a good use of toddlers' time, consider the findings of one study that drilled down into babies' understanding of what they were watching on TV. When groups of 6-, 12- and 18-month-olds watched cartoons played both forward and backward, so that the characters were doing everything in reverse, only the oldest babies showed a preference for the correct order.
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Green vegetables boost immunity
upi.com - 10-19-11
Green vegetables are the source of a chemical signal that is important to boost immunity, British researchers say.
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Substance abuse therapies compared
upi.com - 10-19-11
African-American women are more likely than men to seek counseling to treat substance abuse, but their substance-abuse issues persisted, U.S. researchers say.
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U.S.: Annual hangover cost is $224 billion
upi.com - 10-19-11
The cost of excessive U.S. alcohol consumption -- mostly binge drinking -- in 2006 reached $223.5 billion, or $746 per citizen, officials calculated.
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Hypertension drugs may aid Alzheimer's
upi.com - 10-19-11
A preliminary study finds drugs already used to treat hypertension may help delay Alzheimer's, researchers at the University of Bristol suggest.
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Fewer Patients Hospitalized for Heart Failure, U.S. Study Finds
healthday.com - 10-19-11
In the past decade, the number of Medicare patients hospitalized for heart failure has dropped significantly, researchers report.
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Parents, Doctors Often Differ on Chemo for Incurable Kids
healthday.com - 10-19-11
Parents of children with incurable cancer tend to prefer to continue aggressive chemotherapy rather than pursue supportive end-of-life care, researchers have found.
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Premature Babies at Risk of Ill Health in Later Life, Research Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 10-19-11
Young adults who were born prematurely show multiple biological signs of risks to future health, research from Imperial College London has found. The scientists, reporting their findings October 19 in the journal Pediatric Research, say that the research indicates that urgent work is now needed to monitor preterm babies into adulthood to improve the detection of early signs of disease.
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National Health Care Scorecard: United States Scores 64 out of 100
sciencedaily.com - 10-19-11
The U.S. health care system scored 64 out of 100 on key measures of performance, according to the third national scorecard report from the Commonwealth Fund Commission on a High Performance Health System, released October 18. The scorecard finds that -- despite pockets of improvement -- the U.S as a whole failed to improve when compared to best performers in this country, and among other nations. The report also finds significant erosion in access to care and affordability of care, as health care costs rose far faster than family incomes.
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Omega-3 Fatty Acids Shown to Prevent or Slow Progression of Osteoarthritis
sciencedaily.com - 10-19-11
New research has shown for the first time that omega-3 in fish oil could "substantially and significantly" reduce the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis.
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FCC Cell Phone Safety Guidelines Underestimate Harmful Radiation Absorbed by Children and Small Adults, Says New Analysis
electromagnetichealth.org - 10-18-11
A new paper published online today in Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine demonstrates children and small adults absorb significantly more cell phone radiation than had been previously understood by using the conventional and widely used assessment methodology, the Specific Anthropomorphic Mannequin (i.e. plastic model of a brain, or SAM), to assess the ”Specific Absorption Rate”, known as the SAR.
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How a bowl of soup can help boost your bones
dailymail.co.uk - 10-18-11
Warming winter soups are packed with nutrients and, if you choose wisely, can be a tasty way of helping your body meet different needs...
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'Educational' TV for under-2s could stunt their development
telegraph.co.uk - 10-18-11
'Educational' television programmes aimed at the under-twos do nothing to stimulate them and could actually stunt their development, according to new guidelines on the subject.
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Lung Cancer Patients With Diabetes Live Longer Than Those Without
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-18-11
Lung cancer patients with diabetes tend to live longer than patients without diabetes, according to a new study from Norway due to be published in the November issue of the Journal of Thoracic Oncology. The researchers did not offer an explanation for the tendency; they suggested it needs further investigation, and diabetes should not be considered as a reason to withhold standard cancer therapy.
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When shyness is the sign of something more
cnn.com - 10-18-11
“Cut him some slack. He’s just a teenager.”
How many times have you heard a parent utter that phrase to explain away a child’s moodiness? It’s no secret that teenagers are prone to mood swings and sometimes like to keep to themselves. But according to a study published Monday by the American Academy of Pediatrics, some adolescents’ feelings extend beyond normal human shyness to a debilitating psychiatric disorder: Social phobia.
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Enzyme 'switch' clue to infertility and miscarriage
bbc.co.uk - 10-18-11
Scientists have identified a "fertility switch" protein which appears to increase infertility if levels are too high and fuel miscarriage if too low.
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Americans economizing to pay health bills
upi.com - 10-18-11
Almost half of U.S. adults say their financial situation is worse than a year ago and many are finding ways to save money on healthcare, a survey says.
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Heartworm a pet risk beyond summer
upi.com - 10-18-11
Many think fall signals the end of heartworm season in pets, but U.S. veterinarians and researchers say the parasite is not just a summer threat.
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Profanity on TV Linked to Foul-Mouthed Kids
healthday.com - 10-18-11
Is TV turning our kids into fountains of four-letter words? Maybe so, says a new study that finds a link between foul-mouthed inner-city children and profanity-ridden shows and video games.
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Healthier Diet, Stronger Sperm?
healthday.com - 10-18-11
For years, nutritionists have rallied around the notion that "you are what you eat."
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Skin Cancer Check May Come With New Hairdo
healthday.com - 10-18-11
A trusted hairdresser may be privvy to your deepest secrets -- your age, your real hair color and maybe even the name of your plastic surgeon. Your stylist also may be the first to spot the telltale signs of deadly skin cancer.
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Less Frequent Mammograms May Lower False-Positive Results
healthday.com - 10-18-11
Women who undergo mammograms every two years instead of every year have fewer false-positive results, but the trade-off is a slightly higher risk of being diagnosed with late-stage breast cancer, new research finds.
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Pap Test Still Best for Cervical Cancer Screening, Experts Say
healthday.com - 10-18-11
Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing isn't likely to replace conventional Pap tests as a cervical cancer screening tool among women older than 30, a new report suggests.
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Teachers, Children Mistake Candy for Medicine in Study
sciencedaily.com - 10-18-11
More than one in four kindergarten children, and one in five teachers, had difficulty distinguishing between medicine and candy in new research conducted by two, now seventh-grade students, who presented their findings Oct. 17 at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition in Boston.
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'Drunkorexia:' A Recipe for Disaster
sciencedaily.com - 10-18-11
It is well known that eating disorders are common among teens and college students. Heavy alcohol consumption is another well-known unhealthy habit of this age group. A new study from the University of Missouri shows that when college students combine these two unhealthy habits, their long-term health may be affected. "Drunkorexia" is a new term coined by the media to describe the combination of disordered eating and heavy alcohol consumption.
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New Approach to Treating Listeria Infections
sciencedaily.com - 10-18-11
Research underway at the Trudeau Institute could lead to new treatments for people sickened by Listeria and other sepsis-causing bacteria. Dr. Stephen Smiley's laboratory has published a study in the scientific journal Infection and Immunity that supports a new approach to treating these infections.
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Eating Green Veggies Improves Immune Defenses
sciencedaily.com - 10-18-11
Researchers reporting online in the journal Cell, a Cell Press publication, on October 13th have found another good reason to eat your green vegetables, although it may or may not win any arguments with kids at the dinner table.
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Record-High 50% of Americans Favor Legalizing Marijuana Use
gallup.com - 10-18-11
A record-high 50% of Americans now say the use of marijuana should be made legal, up from 46% last year. Forty-six percent say marijuana use should remain illegal.
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Radioactive cesium found in plankton off N-plant
nhk.or.jp - 10-17-11
High concentrations of radioactive cesium have been found in plankton from the sea near the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.
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Precision With Stem Cells a Step Forward for Treating Multiple Sclerosis, Other Diseases
sciencedaily.com - 10-17-11
Scientists have improved upon their own previous world-best efforts to pluck out just the right stem cells to address the brain problem at the core of multiple sclerosis and a large number of rare, fatal children's diseases.
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California Medical Association Wants Marijuana Legalized
abcnews.go.com - 10-17-11
Advocates for the legalization of marijuana got a new, unprecedented member of their ranks: the California Medical Association, which has adopted an official policy that recommends the legalization and regulation of cannabis.
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That's a fat lot of good: Minister tells us to eat less to tackle obesity but won't put pressure on the food giants
dailymail.co.uk - 10-17-11
The nation’s daily diet needs to be slashed by five billion calories to prevent an obesity epidemic, the Government warned yesterday. Health Secretary Andrew Lansley said that the country is collectively over-indulging in the equivalent of 17million cheeseburgers every day. His latest plans rely on consumers being ‘more honest’ about what they eat and drink.
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A Common Mechanism Gives Shape To Living Beings
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-17-11
Why don't our arms grow from the middle of our bodies? The question isn't as trivial as it appears. Vertebrae, limbs, ribs, tailbone ... in only two days, all these elements take their place in the embryo, in the right spot and with the precision of a Swiss watch. Intrigued by the extraordinary reliability of this mechanism, biologists have long wondered how it works. Now, researchers at EPFL (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne) and the University of Geneva (Unige) have solved the mystery. Their discovery will be published October 13, 2011 in the journal Science.
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Gut Bacteria Influence Statin Treatment Response
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-17-11
Bacteria that exist in our gut may affect how people respond to statins; medications used to control blood cholesterol levels. To date, doctors have not been able to properly explain why some patients on cholesterol-lowering medications respond well, while others don't. Researchers have reported in the journal PLoS One that several bacterial-derived bile acids may be influencing how humans respond to statin treatment.
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DNA sequenced of woman who lived to 115
bbc.co.uk - 10-17-11
The entire DNA sequence of a woman who lived to 115 has been pieced together by scientists.
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Financial, emotional relationships similar
upi.com - 10-17-11
Most people liken the majority of their financial commitments to the kind of relationship they have with their partner or spouse, a British survey indicates.
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Canada warning thousands of hepatitis, HIV
upi.com - 10-17-11
Nearly 7,000 Canadians will be getting letters warning them they may have been exposed to hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus, health officials say.
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Promising New Approach to Treating Debilitating Nervous System Disease
sciencedaily.com - 10-17-11
A groundbreaking study in the journal Nature Medicine suggests what could become the first effective treatment for a debilitating and fatal disease of the central nervous system called SCA1.
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Preschoolers May Get Attention-Deficit Drugs Under Guidelines
bloomberg.com - 10-17-11
Children as young as 4 years old may now be treated with medications such as Novartis AG (NOVN)’s Ritalin for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, under new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics.
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US Attorney Eyes Going After Media Running Pot Ads
abcnews.go.com - 10-17-11
The chief federal prosecutor in San Diego is contemplating expanding a federal crackdown on the medical marijuana industry by going after newspapers, radio stations and other outlets that run advertisements for California's pot dispensaries, her office told The Associated Press on Thursday.
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Room for one more? World population to reach 7 BILLION in next few days
dailymail.co.uk - 10-16-11
The world's population looks set to smash through the seven billion barrier in the next few days, according to the United Nations.
It comes just 12 years since the total reached six billion - with official estimates saying the figure will top eight billion in 2025 and 10 billion before the end of the century.
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Alaska ringed seals show symptoms of unknown disease; animals come to shore with lesions
ashingtonpost.com - 10-16-11
An unknown disease is killing or weakening scores of ringed seals along Alaska’s north coast, where the animals have been found with lesions on their hind flippers and inside their mouths.
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Barack Obama, drug warrior
sfgate.com - 10-16-11
Last month, his Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives issued a memo that stated that it is unlawful for anyone with a state-issued medical marijuana card to possess a gun or ammunition. This month, four U.S. attorneys in California announced that they are escalating prosecution of medical marijuana clubs by going after the assets of their landlords and property owners.
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Study: FDA seafood standards flawed
usatoday.com - 10-16-11
In wake of last year's BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, a new study from an environmental watchdog group contends that current federal standards underestimate the risk to pregnant women and children of cancer-causing contaminants that can accumulate in seafood from such spills.
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Elderly patients condemned to early death by secret use of do not resuscitate orders
telegraph.co.uk - 10-16-11
The orders – which record an advance decision that a patient's life should not be saved if their heart stops – are routinely being applied without the knowledge of the patient or their relatives.
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No sex please, we're British and over 60
msnbc.msn.com - 10-16-11
An event organized by a British city to school its older residents in the arts of safe sex has been cancelled due to lack of interest.
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What the Yuck: Just food poisoning?
cnn.com - 10-16-11
Q: Every time I hear about a deadly Listeria outbreak, I wonder: How do I tell the difference between harmless food poisoning and the life-threatening kind?
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LGBTQ youth at higher risk of suicide
upi.com - 10-16-11
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth are at greater risk than others of suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts, U.S. researchers say.
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15- to 24-year-olds have half of U.S. STD
upi.com - 10-16-11
People ages 15-24 acquire nearly one-half of all new sexually transmitted diseases, U.S. health officials say.
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Fewer Than Half of Kids Hurt in Car Crashes Wearing Seat Belts
healthday.com - 10-16-11
Fewer than half of U.S. children injured in car crashes between 2002 and 2006 were wearing seat belts, and minority children had the lowest rates of seat-belt use, a new study finds.
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Many Don't Believe Their Obesity Poses Health Risks: Study
healthday.com - 10-16-11
Many overweight and obese patients seen in hospital emergency departments don't believe their weight poses a risk to their health, and many say doctors have never told them otherwise, a new study finds.
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Researchers Block Morphine's Itchy Side Effect
sciencedaily.com - 10-16-11
Itching is one of the most prevalent side effects of powerful, pain-killing drugs like morphine, oxycodone and other opioids. The opiate-associated itch is so common that even women who get epidurals for labor pain often complain of itching. For many years, scientists have scratched their own heads about why drugs that so effectively suppress pain also induce itch.
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Psychopathic Killers: Computerized Text Analysis Uncovers the Word Patterns of a Predator
sciencedaily.com - 10-16-11
As words can be the soul's window, scientists are learning to peer through it: Computerized text analysis shows that psychopathic killers make identifiable word choices -- beyond conscious control -- when talking about their crimes.
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'Never Married' Men Still More Likely to Die from Cancer
sciencedaily.com - 10-16-11
It is known that the unmarried are in general more likely to die than their married counterparts and there is some indication that the divide is in fact getting worse. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Public Health looks at the changes in cancer survival over the past 40 years and show that the difference in mortality between the married and never married, especially between married and never married men, has also increased.
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Reassurance for Dementia Sufferers On Impact of Common Drugs
sciencedaily.com - 10-16-11
Researchers whose findings on the detrimental impact of some common medicines on elderly people were widely reported earlier in the summer have found that taking a few of these medicines does not appear to cause further cognitive impairment in those already suffering from dementia.
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20 pct of Latinos with HIV don't know it
upi.com - 10-15-11
Approximately one in 50 Latinos in the United States can expect to be diagnosed with HIV in his or her lifetime, federal health officials said.
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The woman who aged from 23 to 73 in 'a few days'
dailymail.co.uk - 10-15-11
These pictures may look like an attractive woman in her 20s and her grandmother. But they are said to be the same person – apparently taken just days apart. The young Vietnamese woman at the centre of the improbable medical case, Nguyen Thi Phuong, claims the transformation may have come about because of an extreme allergy to seafood.
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Maintaining Substantial Weight Loss In Long Term Is Possible Say Researchers
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-15-11
While slow weight gain is typical for weight losers, some manage to maintain substantial weight loss in the long term, as much as 10% of initial body weight for ten years, according to a new analysis of data from a registry of successful dieters. Dr Graham Thomas, a researcher at the National Weight Control Registry, presented the results of the analysis at the 29th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Obesity Society, in Orlando, Florida, last week.
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Obama drops long-term health care program
cnn.com - 10-15-11
Citing cost concerns, the Obama administration said Friday it has halted a long-term care insurance program that was part of the massive health care law passed in 2010.
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Obesity 'worse for teen girls' blood pressure'
bbc.co.uk - 10-15-11
Obesity has a greater impact on the blood pressure of teenage girls than on teenage boys, a US study has suggested.
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Obesity 'worse for teen girls' blood pressure'
bbc.co.uk - 10-15-11
Obesity has a greater impact on the blood pressure of teenage girls than on teenage boys, a US study has suggested.
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Most men say children 'complete' them
upi.com - 10-15-11
Contrary to conventional wisdom, most men say having children is important to their feeling complete as a man, U.S. researchers found.
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Progress noted on earlier autism diagnosis
upi.com - 10-15-11
U.S. researchers say they are beginning to detect behaviors and symptoms of autism that may make earlier diagnosis -- and intervention -- possible.
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Video games 'can alter children's brains'
telegraph.co.uk - 10-15-11
Baroness Greenfield, the former director of the Royal Institution, said spending too much time staring at computer screens can cause physical changes in the brain that lead to attention and behaviour problems.
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Bad economy may have men cheating on wives
upi.com - 10-15-11
If the current economic doldrums persist and high unemployment and lower wages are a way of life, more men may cheat on their wives, U.S. researchers suggest.
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1 in 6 Cellphones in Britain Contaminated With 'Fecal Matter'
healthday.com - 10-15-11
One in six cellphones in Britain may be contaminated with fecal matter that can spread E. coli, likely because so many people don't wash their hands properly after using the toilet, a new study contends.
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Teen Crash Risk High in First Month of Driving, Study Finds
healthday.com - 10-15-11
Teen drivers are 50 percent more likely to crash within the first month of getting their driver's license than they are after driving for a full year, according to a study from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.
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Undergrads' Drinking Patterns May Predict Future Abuse
healthday.com - 10-15-11
College students who are heavy drinkers may be more likely to continue their unhealthy drinking habits after graduation if they have high levels of impulsivity and aggression, according to a new study.
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Breastfeeding Reduces the Risk of Allergies, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 10-15-11
Today, about one in four European children suffer from allergy, which makes this disease the non-infectious epidemic of the 21st century. Evidence suggests that lifestyle factors and nutritional patterns, such as breastfeeding, help to reduce the early symptoms of allergy.
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Why the Black Death Was the Mother of All Plagues
discovery.com - 10-15-11
Plague germs teased from mediaeval cadavers in a London cemetery have shed light on why the bacterium that unleashed the Black Death was so lethal and spawned later waves of epidemics.
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Children of mothers who don't take folic acid ‘more likely to have severe language delays’
dailymail.co.uk - 10-14-11
Women who fail to take folic acid in early pregnancy could be threatening their child's ability to speak according to scientists.
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World-first drug could stop cataract blindness, say scientists
dailymail.co.uk - 10-14-11
They are the main cause of world blindness with over half of those aged 65 and over affected by cataract developments in one or both eyes.
But now scientists have created a revolutionary drug that could prevent the clouding that gradually develops over the lens.
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Are we returning to a postcode lottery? NHS waiting times for hospital treatment soar by 50% in one year under Coalition
dailymail.co.uk - 10-14-11
One in three of NHS trusts are breaching waiting times for treating patients - almost four times the number this time last year, according to the latest figures.
Data for England reveals 45 primary care trusts (PCTs) did not hit the target in August for treating patients within 18 weeks of referral by their GP.
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'Death sentence' as NHS watchdog rejects skin cancer drug
telegraph.co.uk - 10-14-11
Clinical trials had shown that half of those who were given the drug were still alive a year later, twice as many as those given an alternative treatment.
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Materialistic couples have more problems
msnbc.msn.com - 10-14-11
Loving money may not be good for your love life, according to new research that finds that materialists have unhappier marriages than couples who don't care much about possessions.
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FDA Allowed Unsafe Seafood Onto Market After BP Oil Spill
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-14-11
A study accuses the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of allowing seafoods with unsafe levels of contaminants to enter the food chain after the BP oil disaster. A study carried out by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and published in the peer-reviewed Environmental Health Perspective reports that the FDA underestimated the risk of cancer from accumulated contaminants in the seafood - especially the risk for pregnant mothers and children who live in the area.
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Are female orgasms a 'bonus'?
cnn.com - 10-14-11
What do female orgasms and male nipples have in common? It’s a question that is helping inform research into the purpose of female orgasm (other than simply as a form of pleasure).
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India encephalitis outbreak kills 400, mainly children
bbc.co.uk - 10-14-11
More than 400 people, mainly children, have died in an outbreak of viral encephalitis in northern India, health officials say.
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Gene therapy and stem cells unite
bbc.co.uk - 10-14-11
Two of the holy grails of medicine - stem cell technology and precision gene therapy - have been united for the first time in humans, say scientists.
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Raw vegetables and fruit 'counteract heart risk genes'
bbc.co.uk - 10-14-11
People who are genetically susceptible to heart disease can lower their risk by eating plenty of fruit and raw vegetables, a study suggests.
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No official definition for 'natural' food
upi.com - 10-14-11
No government agency, certification group or other entity defines the term "natural" on food labels, a U.S. watchdog group says.
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Babies sense fairness, can be altruistic
upi.com - 10-14-11
Infants as young as 15 months detect the difference between equal and unequal distribution of food and are willing to share, U.S. researchers say.
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U.S. Heart Disease Rates Keep Falling: CDC
healthday.com - 10-14-11
The percentage of Americans with the nation's number one killer, heart disease, continues to fall, according to new research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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For Many, Epilepsy Surgery Effective Long-Term
healthday.com - 10-14-11
Almost half of the people who undergo surgery for epilepsy remain free of seizures 10 years later, a new study finds.
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Wanted: Spouse With Car, Stocks, Bonds
healthday.com - 10-14-11
Got a car? How about a bank account, stocks or bonds? If you answered "yes," you may find yourself also saying, "I do."
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Overzealous Parents, Coaches Take the Fun From Kids' Sports
healthday.com - 10-14-11
Every afternoon and weekend, children in uniform and parents toting sports gear, water bottles and lawn chairs converge on America's fields for soccer, baseball and football games.
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People With Mental Health Issues More Likely to Be Uninsured
healthday.com - 10-14-11
Americans with frequent bouts of mental distress are more likely to lack health insurance than those with frequent physical distress, a new study says.
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New Breeds of Broccoli Remain Packed With Health Benefits
sciencedaily.com - 10-14-11
Research performed by scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and published recently in the journal Crop Science has demonstrated that mineral levels in new varieties of broccoli have not declined since 1975, and that the broccoli contains the same levels of calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, potassium and other minerals that have made the vegetable a healthy staple of American diets for decades.
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Natural Processes Can Limit Spread of Arsenic in Water, Says Study
sciencedaily.com - 10-14-11
Many people in Bangladesh and other parts of Asia have been poisoned by drinking groundwater laced with arsenic -- not introduced by humans, but leached naturally from sediments, and now being tapped by shallow drinking wells. In recent years, to avoid the problem, deeper wells have been sunk 500 feet or more to purer waters -- but fears have remained that when deep water is pumped out, contaminated water might filter down to replace it. Now, a study has shown that deep sediments can grab the arsenic and take it out of circulation -- a finding that may help to keep wells safe elsewhere, including in the United States.
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Certain Mouth Bacteria Signal Pancreatic Cancer, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 10-14-11
Particular types of mouth bacteria, some of which are found in gum disease, are associated with the development of pancreatic cancer, indicates a small study published online in the journal Gut.
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Does a Bigger Brain Make for a Smarter Child in Babies Born Prematurely?
sciencedaily.com - 10-14-11
New research suggests the growth rate of the brain's cerebral cortex in babies born prematurely may predict how well they are able to think, speak, plan and pay attention later in childhood. The research is published in the October 12, 2011, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The cerebral cortex is the outer layer of the brain covering the cerebrum, and is responsible for cognitive functions, such as language, memory, attention and thought.
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First Physical Evidence Bilingualism Delays Onset of Alzheimer's Symptoms
sciencedaily.com - 10-14-11
Researchers at St. Michael's Hospital have found that people who speak more than one language have twice as much brain damage as unilingual people before they exhibit symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. It's the first physical evidence that bilingualism delays the onset of the disease.
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Vitamin E linked to higher prostate risk
upi.com - 10-13-11
A study involving 35,000 U.S. men found those who had a daily supplement of vitamin E had a significantly increased risk of prostate cancer, researchers say.
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Feds to target newspapers, radio for marijuana ads
californiawatch.org - 10-13-11
Federal prosecutors are preparing to target newspapers, radio stations and other media outlets that advertise medical marijuana dispensaries in California, another escalation in the Obama administration's newly invigorated war against the state's pot industry.
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Eating fruits, vegetables may cut risk for heart disease gene
usatoday.com - 10-13-11
A healthy diet with lots of fruits and vegetables can significantly weaken the effect of a gene associated with an increased risk of heart disease, a new study suggests.
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Guava 'the ultimate superfood'
telegraph.co.uk - 10-13-11
A series of tests on Indian fruits, including Himalayan apples and pomegranates, bananas from the south, grapes from Maharashtra, found the guava, exotic in Europe but a poor man's fruit in India, to be the ultimate superfood with the highest concentration of antioxidants which protects against cell damage which ages skin and can cause cancer.
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Many cancer survivors suffer from PTSD, says study
msnbc.msn.com - 10-13-11
A cancer diagnosis can leave lasting psychological scars akin to those inflicted by war, according to a new survey.
More than decade after being told they had the disease, nearly four out of 10 cancer survivors said they were still plagued by symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD.
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Repaired Stem Cells Grow New Working Liver Cells
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-13-11
UK scientists took stem cells made from the skin cells of patients with an inherited liver disease called alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency, used "molecular scissors" to effect a "clean" repair of the gene mutation that causes the disease, and showed, both in test tubes and in mice, that the gene worked correctly when the stem cells made new cells that were almost like liver cells. Nature reports the study, led by researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the University of Cambridge, in its 12 October online issue.
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How sleep apnea can wreck your sex life
cnn.com - 10-13-11
It was a normal follow-up to see how Kurt was adjusting to his CPAP, the continuous positive airway pressure machine prescribed for people with sleep apnea. Not only did he report having a pretty easy time of getting used to sticking some plastic up his nose every night, he said he also felt more rested when he awoke and was more alert throughout the day.
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In tough economy, Americans having fewer babies
cnn.com - 10-13-11
That's how many babies were born in the United States in 2007, the highest number ever.
But after that, the number dropped. Last year, just over 4 million boys and girls were born in the 50 states.
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Black Death genetic code 'built'
bbc.co.uk - 10-13-11
The genetic code of the germ that caused the Black Death has been reconstructed by scientists for the first time.
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More teens using birth control during first sex
upi.com - 10-13-11
Eight in 10 U.S. male teens used a condom the first time they had sex from 2006 to 2010 -- an increase of 9 percentage points from 2002, health officials say.
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The pill changes women's attraction to men
upi.com - 10-13-11
Women who were on the pill when they met their partner were less sexually satisfied or attracted to their partners, researchers in Scotland say.
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HPV is second-leading cause of cancer
upi.com - 10-13-11
Parents should have children vaccinated against human papilloma virus because it causes more cancers than anything besides smoking, U.S. researchers say.
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Oral Bacteria Might Signal Early Pancreatic Cancer
healthday.com - 10-13-11
Changes in the bacteria in a person's mouth might signal the onset of pancreatic cancer, preliminary research reveals.
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Preemies With Faster Brain Growth May End Up Smarter
healthday.com - 10-13-11
Growth in a particular part of a premature baby's brain in the first weeks and months following birth may predict how well a youngster is able to think, plan and pay attention later in childhood, new research suggests.
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Death Toll From Cantaloupe-Linked Listeria Outbreak Now Stands at 23
healthday.com - 10-13-11
The death toll from an outbreak of listeria first linked to tainted cantaloupes has risen to 23, and a total of 116 people have been sickened across 25 states, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported late Wednesday.
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Researchers Reconstruct Genome of the Black Death; Bacteria Found to Be Ancestor of All Modern Plagues
sciencedaily.com - 10-13-11
An international team -- led by researchers at McMaster University and the University of Tubingen in Germany -- has sequenced the entire genome of the Black Death, one of the most devastating epidemics in human history.
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Eating Your Greens Can Change the Effect of Your Genes On Heart Disease
sciencedaily.com - 10-13-11
A long-held mantra suggests that you can't change your family, the genes they pass on, or the effect of these genes. Now, an international team of scientists, led by researchers at McMaster and McGill universities, is attacking that belief.
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Chlamydia jab hope as scientists make breakthrough on treating most common sexually transmitted disease
dailymail.co.uk - 10-13-11
A vaccine for chlamydia - the most common sexually transmitted disease in Britain - could be developed after a breakthrough by scientists.
For decades experts have been prevented from fully understanding the bacteria, which if undetected can make sufferers infertile.
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Rare breast cancer seen more in Hispanics
upi.com - 10-12-11
Rare (breast) phyllodes tumors -- 0.5 percent to 1 percent of all breast tumors -- tend to be more prevalent in Hispanic women, U.S. researchers say.
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Water Channels in the Body Help Cells Remain in Balance
sciencedaily.com - 10-12-11
Water channels exist not only in nature -- microscopical water channels are also present in the cells of the body, where they ensure that water can be transported through the protective surface of the cell. Scientists at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have discovered that one type of the body's water channels can be modified such that it becomes more stable, which may be significant in the treatment of several diseases.
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Mushroom Compound Appears to Improve Effectiveness of Cancer Drugs, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 10-12-11
A compound isolated from a wild, poisonous mushroom growing in a Southwest China forest appears to help a cancer killing drug fulfill its promise, researchers report.
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Smoking cannabis could make you depressed depending on your genes
dailymail.co.uk - 10-12-11
Young people who have a common genetic quirk are more vulnerable to depression if they smoke cannabis.
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One Third Of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Wait More Than A Year For Physiotherapist Referral, UK
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-12-11
A new study conducted throughout the UK reveals medical evidence of physiotherapy being beneficial in treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). However, findings have also uncovered serious problems in terms of organizing physiotherapy services and its accessibility throughout the UK. The study is published by The National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society (NRAS) and the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP) on the 12th October 2011 to accompany with World Arthritis Day.
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'First ever' fall in global TB
bbc.co.uk - 10-12-11
The number of people falling ill with tuberculosis has declined for the first time, according to the World Health Organization.
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Helping abused Canadian women costs $7B
upi.com - 10-12-11
It costs Canadian taxpayers and charities about $7 billion a year to help women who leave their abusive partners, researchers calculated.
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Extra Vitamin E May Be Associated With Prostate Cancer
healthday.com - 10-12-11
Men taking supplemental vitamin E may be increasing their risk for prostate cancer by up to 17 percent, a new study suggests. But the reason for the association is unclear, the researchers say.
More...


Folic Acid in Pregnancy May Prevent Kids' Language Delays
healthday.com - 10-12-11
Taking folic acid supplements before and during pregnancy was linked to a decreased risk of a having a child with a severe language delay at age 3, according to new research.
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Ginger Supplements Might Ease Inflammation Linked to Colon Cancer
healthday.com - 10-12-11
A small, preliminary study finds that ginger root supplements seem to reduce inflammation in the intestines -- a potential sign that the pills might reduce the risk of colon cancer.
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Common Antibiotic Can Have Serious Adverse Reactions, Review Finds
sciencedaily.com - 10-12-11
A commonly prescribed antimicrobial -- trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole -- that has been used since 1968 can cause serious adverse reactions and physicians need to be aware of these in prescribing, states a review in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
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How the Brain Makes Memories: Rhythmically
sciencedaily.com - 10-12-11
The brain learns through changes in the strength of its synapses -- the connections between neurons -- in response to stimuli. Now, in a discovery that challenges conventional wisdom on the brain mechanisms of learning, UCLA neuro-physicists have found there is an optimal brain "rhythm," or frequency, for changing synaptic strength. And further, like stations on a radio dial, each synapse is tuned to a different optimal frequency for learning.
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Health Benefits of Broccoli Require the Whole Food, Not Supplements
sciencedaily.com - 10-12-11
New research has found that if you want some of the many health benefits associated with eating broccoli or other cruciferous vegetables, you need to eat the real thing -- a key phytochemical in these vegetables is poorly absorbed and of far less value if taken as a supplement.
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Mammography is 'terribly imperfect,' though recommended
usatoday.com - 10-11-11
For women today, turning 40 often brings birthday cake and candles. But it also brings a question: Should I get a mammogram?
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Why autumn can make women's hair fall out...and so can going on a diet or drinking too much tea
dailymail.co.uk - 10-11-11
The wind and rain are bad enough, but autumn’s return has another sting in its tail: you’ll lose more hair, say Swedish researchers.
In a study published in the journal Dermatology, the scientists followed more than 800 healthy women over six years and found that they lost the most hair in the autumn months.
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I'm only alive because I know how to beat the NHS system: A deeply worrying confession from a GP fighting cancer
dailymail.co.uk - 10-11-11
When I was diagnosed with cancer, I was devastated — but sure I’d get the best possible treatment.
After 22 years as a GP, I felt strongly that the NHS was unbeatable when it came to major illnesses like this.
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The trouble with prostate cancer tests
cnn.com - 10-11-11
Doctors who treat prostate cancer disagree on the value of the prostate specific antigen, or PSA, test. But they agree on one thing.
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California bans use of sunbeds for under 18-year-olds
bbc.co.uk - 10-11-11
California has become the first US state to ban the use of sunbeds for anyone under the age of 18.
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Body tricked to not be allergic to peanuts
upi.com - 10-11-11
U.S. scientists say they found a way to turn off the allergic response to food allergies safely and rapidly by tricking the immune system.
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Some vitamins linked to upped death risk
upi.com - 10-11-11
Some supplements including multivitamins, folic acid, iron and copper are linked to a slight increase in death in older women, Finnish and U.S. researchers say.
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Chocolate Could Be Sweet Defense Against Stroke
healthday.com - 10-11-11
In the latest research to tout the cardiovascular benefits of an already beloved food, Swedish scientists report that eating chocolate seems to lower a woman's risk of stroke.
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Dietary Supplements May Harm Older Women: Study
healthday.com - 10-11-11
Far from being healthy, supplements such as multivitamins, minerals and folic acid may actually raise the odds for death in older women who take them, a new study suggests.
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New Alzheimer's Drug Shows Early Promise
healthday.com - 10-11-11
An experimental Alzheimer's disease drug, gantenerumab, may help lower levels of amyloid plaque in the brains of people with the disease, an early clinical trial indicates.
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Restless Legs Syndrome May Boost Blood Pressure
healthday.com - 10-11-11
Middle-aged women who suffer from a common condition called restless legs syndrome may be at increased risk of high blood pressure, U.S. researchers report.
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After Stroke, Crossed Legs a Welcome Sign
healthday.com - 10-11-11
The sooner people can cross their legs after having a stroke, the better their chances for recovery, new research suggests.
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Cow Palace Hosts First Ever Medical Marijuana Job Fair
sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com - 10-11-11
Even though the federal government threatened a crack down on California’s medical marijuana clubs this week, The Cow Palace is brazenly hosting a Cannabis Expo that includes a job fair just south of San Francisco.
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Let me see my pet one last time: The most common request made by the dying
dailymail.co.uk - 10-11-11
The most common wish among dying patients is to see a favourite pet or animal, according to a survey.
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Fertility fears as health experts warn gonorrhoea may soon become incurable
dailymail.co.uk - 10-11-11
Health experts are warning of the 'very real threat' that gonorrhoea could become incurable.
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New fear for nut allergy sufferers: First case of sexually-transmitted reaction is recorded
dailymail.co.uk - 10-10-11
A 20-year-old woman is the first case of an allergy being triggered through sex, after her partner had eaten a handful of Brazil nuts.
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Research on Bleeding and Heat Could Help Soldiers and Outdoor Workers
nytimes.com - 10-10-11
It felt like a ton of bricks on his chest, Antionne Williams said, downing a Coke and recovering after 15 minutes secured in a coffinlike box.
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Dutch classify high-potency marijuana as hard drug
cbsnews.com - 10-10-11
The Dutch government said Friday it would move to classify high-potency marijuana alongside hard drugs such as cocaine and ecstasy, the latest step in the country's ongoing reversal of its famed tolerance policies.
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In Calif., no more tanning beds for under-18 crowd
usatoday.com - 10-10-11
California girls who dream about the sun-kissed skin glorified in song by Katy Perry will have to wait until they turn 18 before they can get the effect from tanning beds under a new first-in-the-nation law.
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Care for multiple sclerosis patients unchanged in five years
telegraph.co.uk - 10-10-11
Care for people with multiple sclerosis has not improved over the past five years, according to a report, with many still struggling to access services that would improve their condition.
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36.6% Of Americans Of Normal Weight, The Rest Are Overweight Or Obese, Gallup Poll
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-10-11
Just over one third of people in the USA are of normal weight, while 35.8% are overweight and 27.6% are obese, according to a Gallup Poll published on Friday. While in most countries these would be alarming figures, the pollsters see them as a promising sign - for the first time in three years the number of overweights is higher than the figure for people of normal weight.
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Male Testosterone Levels Influenced By Genetic Makeup
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-10-11
Variations and risks of low testosterone levels in men are mostly due to genetics. According to research published on Thursday, 6th October in the open-access journal PLoS Genetics, the CHARGE Sex Hormone Consortium is the first genome-wide association investigation assessing the effects of common genetic variants on serum testosterone concentrations in men.
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Brain 'rejects negative thoughts'
bbc.co.uk - 10-10-11
One reason optimists retain a positive outlook even in the face of evidence to the contrary has been discovered, say researchers.
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Pet etiquette 101, where to take your pet
upi.com - 10-10-11
For the majority of pet owners there's no place more pet-friendly that the local public park even though communities with leash laws frown on letting dogs run loose.
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Blame 'Faulty' Frontal Lobe Function for Undying Optimism in Face of Reality
sciencedaily.com - 10-10-11
For some people, the glass is always half full. Even when a football fan's team has lost ten matches in a row, he might still be convinced his team can reverse its run of bad luck. So why, in the face of clear evidence to suggest to the contrary, do some people remain so optimistic about the future?
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If You Don't Snooze, Do You Lose? Wake-Sleep Patterns Affect Brain Synapses During Adolescence
sciencedaily.com - 10-10-11
An ongoing lack of sleep during adolescence could lead to more than dragging, foggy teens, a University of Wisconsin-Madison study suggests. Researchers have found that short-term sleep restriction in adolescent mice prevented the balanced growth and depletion of brain synapses, connections between nerve cells where communication occurs.
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Credence given shooting hot streaks
upi.com - 10-9-11
U.S. scientists say there's something to the notion that having a "hot" hand in basketball increases the odds of a positive outcome on each successive shot.
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Federal officials begin major crackdown on marijuana operations
latimes.com - 10-9-11
Federal prosecutors on Friday launched a significant crackdown on commercial marijuana operations, announcing legal action against several marijuana operations as part of a new statewide enforcement effort.
The stepped-up enforcement escalates the Obama administration's efforts to rein in the spread of pot stores, which accelerated after the attorney general announced in 2009 that federal prosecutors would not target people using medical marijuana in states that allow it.
"It's coming out of left field as far as we're concerned," said Joe Elford, the chief counsel for Americans for Safe Access, which advocates for medical marijuana use. "I really don't know what inspired this. It's a complete about-face from what [Obama] said when he was campaigning."
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Chemical makers say BPA no longer used in bottles
usatoday.com - 10-9-11
Makers of the controversial chemical bisphenol-A have asked federal regulators to phase out rules that allow its use in baby bottles and sippy cups, saying those products haven't contained the plastic-hardening ingredient for two years.
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On the gastric bandwagon: Is this the weight-loss option of the future?
dailymail.co.uk - 10-9-11
With more than 7,000 people a year having gastric band and bypass surgery on the NHS, it’s now seen by the medical profession as an effective way to fight obesity. Andréa Childs meets 13 women who are delighted by the results
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Cold, Flu Season Poses Risks for Kids With Asthma
healthday.com - 10-9-11
Symptoms of asthma can be worsened by a cold or the flu, creating a potentially dangerous situation for children, according to experts at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.
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New Insight Into Plant Immune Defenses
sciencedaily.com - 10-9-11
Researchers funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), among others, have identified an important cog in the molecular machinery of plant immunity -- a discovery that could help crop breeders produce disease-resistant varieties to help ensure future food security. There may also be implications for treating human immune-related disorders. The research, led by Professor Gary Loake at the University of Edinburgh with colleagues from Syngenta is published this evening (02 October 2011) in the journal Nature.
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Residual Damage After Heart Attack No Longer Inevitable
sciencedaily.com - 10-9-11
A new treatment could revolutionize the treatment of patients after a heart attack. Hendrik Jan Ankersmit from the Medical University of Vienna has developed a protein solution which can be used to reduce the scarring of tissue caused by inflammation after a heart attack.
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Dutch coffee shops face new curbs on cannabis sale
reuters.com - 10-9-11
Coffee shops in the Netherlands were left wondering on Saturday how to comply with restrictions announced by the Dutch government on the sale of "strong" cannabis, saying enforcement would be difficult given the laws on production.
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'Good' cholesterol reduces heart attacks
upi.com - 10-8-11
Raising high-density lipoproteins, known as "good" cholesterol, reduces heart attack and stroke risk in diabetes patients, U.S. researchers say.
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Babies know difference between right and wrong when they are just 15 months old
dailymail.co.uk - 10-8-11
It is often thought of as one of the qualities which distinguishes humans from animals.
And a new study has shown that the ability to tell the difference between right and wrong is a skill which even babies can possess.
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'Healthier' McDonald's low-fat blueberry muffin is saltier than a burger
dailymail.co.uk - 10-8-11
A McDonald’s muffin marketed as a healthier option contains more salt than one of its burgers.
The fast-food chain’s low-fat blueberry muffin has 1.7g of salt – more than in three packets of ready-salted crisps.
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Bugging out: Bedbugs stir extreme anxiety
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-8-11
Having a case of bedbugs can cause people to feel so desperate they make irrational decisions that can cost them more than just money.
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Kidney Transplant Recipients May One Day Not Require Daily Drugs
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-8-11
An immune tolerance treatment that has been 30 years in the making has shown promise in a small study where from 12 kidney transplant patients 8 were successfully weaned off their daily immunosuppressive drugs. As well as freeing patients from lifelong use of drugs, such a protocol could reduce long term side effects and bring substantial health-care savings.
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Yoga helps addicts, homeless find peace
cnn.com - 10-8-11
When I first met Sylvia Rascon she told me that what drew her into yoga was her own struggle to find balance in her life. When she found out she could treat people overcoming trauma she knew she wanted to become a teacher, and that’s what brought her to the Lower East Side Harm Reduction Center.
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Why pancreatic cancer is so deadly
cnn.com - 10-8-11
As the technology world mourns computing visionary and Apple, Inc. co-founder Steve Jobs, it's worth taking a closer look at the disease he publicly battled.
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Severe hypoglycaemia cause found
bbc.co.uk - 10-8-11
The cause of a rare and severe form of hypoglycaemia - or very low levels of sugar in the blood - is genetic, say researchers.
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U.S. panel says no to prostate tests
upi.com - 10-8-11
Healthy men should no longer get a PSA blood test for prostate cancer because the testing, overall, does not save lives, a U.S. government panel says.
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Blood Infection Costliest U.S. Hospital Condition: Report
healthday.com - 10-8-11
Septicemia was the single most expensive condition treated in U.S. hospitals in 2009, with a cost of about $15.4 billion, according to a federal government report.
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21 Deaths From Cantaloupe-Linked Listeria Outbreak: CDC
healthday.com - 10-8-11
The death toll from an outbreak of listeria first linked to tainted cantaloupes has risen to 21, and a total of 109 people have been sickened across 23 states, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported late Friday.
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Men Develop Diabetes With Less Body Fat Than Women: Study
healthday.com - 10-8-11
Men develop type 2 diabetes at a lower body-mass index (BMI) than women, and this finding helps explain why men have higher rates of diabetes in many parts of the world, researchers report.
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Boys With Autism May Grow Faster as Babies
healthday.com - 10-8-11
Boys with autism tend to grow faster as babies, with differences from typically developing infants seen in their head size, height and weight, a new study says.
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Winning May Take All Your Brain Power
healthday.com - 10-8-11
Nearly your entire brain is engaged in striving for success when you play games, according to a new study.
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Worm 'Cell Death' Discovery Could Lead to New Drugs for Deadly Parasite
sciencedaily.com - 10-8-11
Researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute have for the first time identified a 'programmed cell death' pathway in parasitic worms that could one day lead to new treatments for one of the world's most serious and prevalent diseases.
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Jonesing for Java: Could Caffeine Use Predict Risk for Cocaine Abuse?
sciencedaily.com - 10-8-11
Parents of young caffeine consumers take heed: that high-calorie energy drink or soda might present more than just obesity risk. In fact, according to a double-blind, placebo-controlled study that examined responses to stimulants, an individual's subjective response to caffeine may predict how he or she will respond to other stimulant drugs, possibly reflecting differences in risk for abuse of other more serious drugs of abuse, such as amphetamine and cocaine.
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New Insight Into Plant Immune Defenses
sciencedaily.com - 10-8-11
Researchers funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), among others, have identified an important cog in the molecular machinery of plant immunity -- a discovery that could help crop breeders produce disease-resistant varieties to help ensure future food security. There may also be implications for treating human immune-related disorders. The research, led by Professor Gary Loake at the University of Edinburgh with colleagues from Syngenta is published this evening (02 October 2011) in the journal Nature.
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Genetic Link to Suicidal Behavior Confirmed
sciencedaily.com - 10-8-11
A new study from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health has found evidence that a specific gene is linked to suicidal behaviour, adding to our knowledge of the many complex causes of suicide. This research may help doctors one day target the gene in prevention efforts.
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Smoking Could Lead to 40 Million Excess Tuberculosis Deaths by 2050
sciencedaily.com - 10-8-11
Between 2010 and 2050, smoking could be responsible for 40 million excess deaths from tuberculosis (TB), according to research published on the British Medical Journal website.
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Man Busted for Marijuana After Petting K-9
nbcnewyork.com - 10-8-11
If you have marijuana in your pocket, it's not a good idea to pet a patrolling police dog.
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Eating slowly may help you lose weight
usatoday.com - 10-7-11
People who eat slowly tend to consume fewer calories and weigh less than those who eat quickly, research shows. Slower eaters also report enjoying their food more and having greater satiety.
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Premature births are 30% higher in cities because of pollution
dailymail.co.uk - 10-7-11
Expectant mothers living in large towns or cities are a third more likely to give birth prematurely because of pollution, research suggests.
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Mobile phone users suffering from 'text neck'
telegraph.co.uk - 10-7-11
A new condition dubbed "text neck" is on the rise due to the amount of time people spend hunched over their mobile phone and tablet computer screens, chiropractors have warned.
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Ads Influence Children's Food Choices
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-7-11
A new study suggests watching advertisements influences children's food choices. Parental encouragement to choose healthier options also appears to have an effect, although when that goes against the message of commercials, parental influence is not as strong as the researchers expected.
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Number Of Older Cancer Survivors Set To Rise Dramatically In US
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-7-11
An analysis of US cancer surveillance data suggests that over the next ten years there will be a dramatic rise in the number of people over the age of 65 either living with cancer or with a history of the disease, mainly due to the greying of the baby boomer generation.
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Fresh push to rid the world of guinea worm by 2015
bbc.co.uk - 10-7-11
The UK government is backing a new campaign to try to rid the world of guinea worm by 2015.
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Alzheimer's test promising
upi.com - 10-7-11
A test for Alzheimer's scores nearly 90 percent for sensitivity and specificity, minimizing false positive and negative results, researchers in Canada say.
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Alzheimer's may originate via infection
upi.com - 10-7-11
Alzheimer's may originate in a form similar to that of infectious prion diseases such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mad cow), U.S. researchers say.
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Zinc important for learning and memory
upi.com - 10-7-11
Zinc plays a critical role in regulating how neurons communicate with one another, affecting memories and learning, U.S. and Canadian researchers say.
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Steve Jobs, Visionary Leader of Apple Inc., Dies at 56
healthday.com - 10-7-11
Steve Jobs, the visionary leader of Apple Inc. who introduced the world to personal computers, then the iPod, the iPhone and the iPad, died on Wednesday following a long battle with cancer.
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Pancreatic Cancer: A Stubborn Foe
healthday.com - 10-7-11
The death of Apple Inc. co-founder Steve Jobs has once again focused attention on cancers of the pancreas, which have claimed the lives of several high-profile celebrities.
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Tanning Beds May Be Even Riskier Than Thought
healthday.com - 10-7-11
Indoor tanning beds may be even more likely to cause skin cancer than previously believed.
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Invasive Melanoma May Be More Likely in Children Than Adults
sciencedaily.com - 10-7-11
A Johns Hopkins Children's Center study of young people with melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer, has found that some children have a higher risk of invasive disease than adults. The study, published online Oct. 5 in the journal Cancer, is believed to be the first to compare disease spread in children and adults, and the results suggest some profound biological differences between childhood and adult melanoma, the researchers say.
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Baby Formula: Inflammatory Food Toxins Found in High Levels in Infants
sciencedaily.com - 10-7-11
Researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine have found high levels of food toxins called Advanced Glycation End products (AGEs) in infants. Excessive food AGEs, through both maternal blood transmission and baby formula, could together significantly increase children's risk for diseases such as diabetes from a very young age. A second study of AGEs in adults found that cutting back on processed, grilled, and fried foods, which are high in AGEs, may improve insulin resistance in people with diabetes. AGEs -- toxic glucose byproducts previously tied to high blood sugar -- are found in most heated foods and, in great excess, in commercial infant formulas.
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Changes in Brain Function in Early HIV Infection: A Reliable Indicator of Disease Prognosis?
sciencedaily.com - 10-7-11
Measurable changes in brain function and communication between brain regions may be a consequence of virus-induced injury during the early stages of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. These abnormalities and their implications in disease prognosis are detailed in an article in the neuroscience journal Brain Connectivity.
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Biologists Find 'Surprising' Number of Unknown Viruses in Sewage
sciencedaily.com - 10-7-11
Though viruses are the most abundant life form on Earth, our knowledge of the viral universe is limited to a tiny fraction of the viruses that likely exist. In a paper published in the online journal mBio, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh, Washington University in St. Louis, and the University of Barcelona found that raw sewage is home to thousands of novel, undiscovered viruses, some of which could relate to human health.
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IRS ruling strikes fear in medical marijuana industry
msnbc.msn.com - 10-7-11
In a potentially crushing blow to the burgeoning medical marijuana industry, the IRS has ruled that dispensaries cannot deduct standard business expenses such as payroll, security or rent.
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Scientists debate benefits of memory-dampening drugs
usatoday.com - 10-6-11
Aversion to memory-dampening drugs among medical researchers may leave millions of veterans and assault victims needlessly suffering post-traumatic stress disorders, some neuroscientists are warning.
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Embryo from skin cells: Cloning era closer after men's DNA put into egg
dailymail.co.uk - 10-6-11
Scientists have created human embryos from slivers of skin – bringing closer the day when babies are cloned in the lab.
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Hungry babies can smell mother's milk and are guided to food by their noses
dailymail.co.uk - 10-6-11
t is not just grown-ups who cannot resist the smell of food. Babies sniff out their mothers’ milk, it seems. Research suggests that newborns are guided to their food supply by their noses.
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World's hottest chilli contest leaves two in hospital
telegraph.co.uk - 10-6-11
Emergency services were called to Kismot Restaurant's curry-eating challenge, on St Leonards Place, Edinburgh, after competitors started writhing on the floor in agony, vomiting and fainting during the contest.
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Tainted seafood reaching American tables, experts say
msn.com - 10-6-11
Filthy seafood infected with bacteria or tainted with drugs and antibiotics banned in the U.S. is finding its way onto the plates of Americans, according to state and federal officials, consumer advocates, academics and food safety experts.
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Upside to embarrassing moments: They make people like you
msn.com - 10-6-11
Have you ever fallen asleep in a public place, started snoring loudly until it woke you up, then noticed others staring at you? Or accidentally knocked over your water glass in a crowded restaurant and sent it crashing to the floor?
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Higher testosterone can protect the heart in older men
msn.com - 10-6-11
Elderly men with naturally higher levels of testosterone may be less likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke than those men with lower levels of the hormone, according to a study.
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Could Alzheimer's Be Infectious, Like Mad Cow, CJD?
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-6-11
The brain damage seen in some cases of Alzheimer's disease could have its roots in an infectious prion-like disease, such as that seen in bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mad cow) and its human form Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), according to an international study published this week in the journal Molecular Psychiatry that was led by the University of Texas Medical School at Houston in the US.
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Calming your child's ADHD symptoms
cnn.com - 10-6-11
Five-year-old Max came to see me in my pediatrics practice because his kindergarten teachers were convinced that he had ADHD. They knew little about his life, yet they were pressuring his mother, Alice, to come to me in the hopes that I would prescribe medication, because his behavior in class was increasingly disruptive. Alice came to the first visit armed with the standard forms, indicating that he had scored in the high range for ADHD.
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Fresh push to rid the world of guinea worm by 2015
bbc.co.uk - 10-6-11
The UK government is backing a new campaign to try to rid the world of guinea worm by 2015.
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Human 'cloning' makes embryonic stem cells
bbc.co.uk - 10-6-11
A form of cloning has been used to create personalised embryonic stem cells in humans, say researchers.
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The brain takes special notice of winning
upi.com - 10-6-11
When a person plays a game -- even a simple one such as rock-paper-scissors, the brain takes notice, in fact, the whole brain is involved, U.S. researchers say.
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Canadians urged to slow down cellphone use
upi.com - 10-6-11
Canada's national health agency is recommending reducing the use of cellphones, particularly among children, as a hedge against possible carcinogenic effects.
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A shot of cortisone may help avert PTSD
upi.com - 10-6-11
An injection of cortisone, a steroid hormone, can prevent post-traumatic stress disorder in 60 percent of those who experience trauma, Israeli researchers say.
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Experimental MS Drug Shows Promise
healthday.com - 10-6-11
A new oral drug for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis appears to reduce relapse rates and disability progression, according to the results of a so-called phase 3 trial.
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Health Woes Still Strike Women Exposed to Banned Pregnancy Drug
healthday.com - 10-6-11
Women whose mothers were given the drug diethylstilbestrol (DES) during pregnancy are at increased risk for fertility problems and cancer as they age, new research shows.
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More Americans Face Longers Trips to ER
healthday.com - 10-6-11
Nearly one in four Americans must now travel farther to the nearest trauma center than 10 years ago due to closures of hospital trauma centers, a new study shows.
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Rebooting the System: Immune Cells Repair Damaged Lung Tissues After Flu Infection
sciencedaily.com - 10-6-11
There's more than one way to mop up after a flu infection. Now, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania report in Nature Immunology that a previously unrecognized population of lung immune cells orchestrate the body's repair response following flu infection.
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Seeds of Destruction in Parkinson's Disease: Spread of Diseased Proteins Kills Neurons
sciencedaily.com - 10-6-11
New research suggests that small "seed" amounts of diseased brain proteins can be taken up by healthy neurons and propagated within them to cause neurodegeneration. The research, published by Cell Press in the October 6 issue of the journal Neuron, sheds light on the mechanisms associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) and provides a model for discovering early intervention therapeutics that can prevent or slow the devastating loss of neurons that underlies PD.
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Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: Natalizumab Reduces Relapses and Disability, Review Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 10-6-11
Taking the new generation anti-inflammatory drug natalizumab for two years lowers the number of remitting multiple sclerosis patients who experience relapses and progression of disability. This is the main finding of a systematic review published in the latest edition of The Cochrane Library.
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One Quarter of Seniors Over 70 Have Had Silent Strokes
sciencedaily.com - 10-6-11
Everyday, 1,000 people in Canada turn 65, entering a stage of life that has increasing risk of stroke and Alzheimer's disease.
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Here, There, Everywhere: Reward and Penalty Processing Is Widespread in the Human Brain
sciencedaily.com - 10-6-11
Our behavior is often guided by the desire to obtain positive outcomes and avoid negative consequences, and neuroscientists have put a great deal of effort into looking for reward and punishment "centers" in the brain. Now, new research published by Cell Press in the October 6 issue of the journal Neuron reveals that neural signals related to reinforcement and punishment are far more broadly distributed throughout the entire human brain than was previously thought.
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Texting while driving more dangerous than thought: study
ca.news.yahoo.com - 10-6-11
Texting or emailing while driving is more dangerous than previously thought, according to a new study of the behavior.
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Depression Uncouples Brain's 'Hate Circuit', MRI Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 10-5-11
A new study using MRI scans, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng, from the University of Warwick's Department of Computer Science, has found that depression frequently seems to uncouple the brain's 'hate circuit.'
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One in eight people spend more time on mobile phone than talking to their partner
dailymail.co.uk - 10-5-11
For those lucky enough to be in love, you’d think it would only be their sweetheart they want within arm’s reach at night.
But it appears that for many Britons, their other half has been upstaged by a rather modern love rival – a smartphone.
One in eight adults claim their partner spends more time using their phone than speaking to them, a poll shows.
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This Is Your Brain On Estrogen
sciencedaily.com - 10-5-11
It's no secret that women often gain weight as they get older. The sex hormone estrogen has an important, if underappreciated, role to play in those burgeoning waistlines.
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Residential Washers May Not Kill Hospital-Acquired Bacteria
sciencedaily.com - 10-5-11
Residential washing machines may not always use hot enough water to eliminate dangerous bacteria like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Acinetobacter, a Gram-negative bacteria, from hospital uniforms, according to a study published in the November issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.
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Throat cancer up by 225 percent due to HPV
upi.com - 10-5-11
The dramatic increases in U.S. incidence of throat cancer can be attributed to infection with the human papillomavirus, U.S. researchers say.
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What's for dinner? Rainbow coloured carrots and super broccoli that's healthier and sweeter
dailymail.co.uk - 10-5-11
The healthiest foods aren’t usually the ones that tempt our tastebuds or turn our heads.
But two new additions to the supermarket shelves could be about to prove that theory wrong.
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Fair-skinned? You may need to pop vitamin D pills, say experts
dailymail.co.uk - 10-5-11
Fair-skinned people who burn easily in the sun may need to take vitamin D supplements, according to research.
Vitamin D is essential for healthy bones and people get most of what they need from exposure to sunlight during the summer months.
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Thousands of us are hiding our misery behind a happy mask. Could YOU be a victim of smiling depression?
dailymail.co.uk - 10-5-11
He’s one of the country’s best-loved comedians, leaving audiences in stitches with his fizzing sense of humour.
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How fighting fat with fat could offer a new way to battle obesity
dailymail.co.uk - 10-5-11
Scientists have discovered a hormone that fights fat with fat, offering new ways of battling the obesity epidemic.
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Breakthrough Discovery Shows How The Brain Copes With Stress
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-5-11
A research team from the University of Leicester say they have discovered the nerve cells in the brain that are responsible for coping with stress.
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HIV Infection And Transmission Rates Double With Hormonal Contraceptive Usage
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-5-11
Women who use a hormonal contraceptive have double the risk of becoming infected with HIV-1, and are also twice as likely to pass the infection on to their sexual partner, researchers from the University of Washington, Seattle, reported in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. The raised risk is especially notable among those using injectables. The authors informed that over 140 million adult females around the world use hormonal contraception, including long-acting injectables or oral pills.
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Those with cancer tend to lack vitamin D
upi.com - 10-5-11
Three-quarters of cancer patients have insufficient levels of vitamin D and those with the lowest levels have the most advanced cancer, U.S. researchers say.
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Happy Kids a Product of Genes, Parenting, Study Finds
healthday.com - 10-5-11
As scientists continue to tease out the impact of nature versus nurture, it appears that kids unlucky enough to get a "downer" personality gene can end up with sunnier outlooks when they're parented in a warm, positive manner.
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Older Dads Can Pass on Gene Mutations That Lower Intellect
healthday.com - 10-5-11
Certain genetic abnormalities in a man's chromosomes appear to be linked to intellectual disabilities in his offspring, especially if he fathered them late in life, a new study suggests.
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Advance Directives Might Curb Cost of End-of-Life Care
healthday.com - 10-5-11
Depending on where you live, having an advance directive may raise the odds that you'll receive hospice services and reduce the overall cost of your end-of-life care, a new study indicates.
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Green Tea Helps Mice Keep Off Extra Pounds
sciencedaily.com - 10-5-11
Green tea may slow down weight gain and serve as another tool in the fight against obesity, according to Penn State food scientists.
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Alzheimer's Might Be Transmissible in Similar Way as Infectious Prion Diseases, Research Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 10-5-11
The brain damage that characterizes Alzheimer's disease may originate in a form similar to that of infectious prion diseases such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mad cow) and Creutzfeldt-Jakob, according to newly published research by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
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Natural Compound Helps Reverse Diabetes in Mice
sciencedaily.com - 10-5-11
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have restored normal blood sugar metabolism in diabetic mice using a compound the body makes naturally. The finding suggests that it may one day be possible for people to take the compound much like a daily vitamin as a way to treat or even prevent type 2 diabetes.
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IRS Hits Oakland Pot Shop With $2.4M Tax Bill
myfoxny.com - 10-5-11
The federal government has found a new weapon in its war on marijuana — the tax man.
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CDC: Self-reported drunk driving is down
ap.org - 10-5-11
Drunken driving incidents have fallen 30 percent in the last five years, and last year were at their lowest mark in nearly two decades, according to a new federal report.
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Elderly Drug Abusers Get Narcotics From Medicare, Senators Say
bloomberg.com - 10-5-11
Disabled and elderly drug abusers may be costing taxpayer-funded Medicare almost $150 million a year by convincing doctors to write prescriptions for oxycodone and other narcotics, a government report found.
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Study: $6.7 billion wasted in primary care
upi.com - 10-4-11
About $6.7 billion was spent on unnecessary tests or prescribing unnecessary drugs in primary care in 2009, U.S. researchers found.
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Baby surgeries, learning disabilities link
upi.com - 10-4-11
U.S. researchers found a link between multiple surgeries requiring general anesthesia in children under age 2 childhood learning disabilities later in life.
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Girlfriends are key to women's optimism
usatoday.com - 10-4-11
Midlife women are flourishing compared with men. Despite the daily gloom of economic predictions, women in midlife are more optimistic about their lives today and five years from now than men are.
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Over-65s who take a daily aspirin are 'twice as likely to suffer age-related sight loss'
dailymail.co.uk - 10-4-11
Pensioners who take an aspirin every day are twice as likely to suffer an age-related loss of vision than people who never take the pain reliever, according to a European study.
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Fair skinned people 'need vitamin D supplements'
telegraph.co.uk - 10-4-11
Vitamin D is essential for healthy bones and people get most of what they need from exposure to sunlight during the summer months.
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Flood of food imported to U.S., but only 2 percent inspected
msnbc.msn.com - 10-4-11
At a sprawling warehouse here, two investigators from the U. S. Food and Drug Administration watched intently as 50 boxes of preserved bean curd from China were emptied into a grinding machine.
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Cancer spike, mainly in men, tied to HPV from oral sex
msnbc.msn.com - 10-4-11
A huge spike in the number of head and neck cancers linked to HPV over nearly two decades is raising alarms about the risk of the sexually contracted infections in a whole new population: men.
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Denmark Taxes Fatty Food
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-4-11
In a bid to encourage healthier eating among its citizens, Denmark, a country famous for its butter and bacon, has brought in a tax on foods containing more than 2.3% saturated fat. As from last Saturday, all such products in Denmark now carry a tax to the tune of 16 Danish krone ($2.86, £1.84) per kilogram (2.2 lbs) of saturated fat that goes into making them.
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Healthy diet may reduce risk of birth defects
cnn.com - 10-4-11
Women run a lower risk of having babies with certain birth defects if they eat a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains during their childbearing years, a new study suggests.
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Men 'more prone to type 2 diabetes'
bbc.co.uk - 10-4-11
Researchers say they have discovered why men may be more likely than women to develop type 2 diabetes - they are biologically more susceptible.
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Beta blockers 'may stop breast cancer spreading'
bbc.co.uk - 10-4-11
Cancer experts are to carry out a major study to see if commonly used blood pressure drugs cut the risk of breast cancer spreading.
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Facebook Pages May Offer Clues to Underage Drinking
healthday.com - 10-4-11
Facebook and other online social networking sites might be new weapons in the fight against underage drinking and alcohol abuse, a new study shows.
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Preemies May Be at Higher Risk of Epilepsy Later in Life
healthday.com - 10-4-11
Babies born very preterm -- defined as 23 to 31 weeks of gestational age -- are five times more likely than full-term newborns to have epilepsy as an adult, according to a recent study.
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Rebooting the System: Immune Cells Repair Damaged Lung Tissues After Flu Infection
sciencedaily.com - 10-4-11
There's more than one way to mop up after a flu infection. Now, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania report in Nature Immunology that a previously unrecognized population of lung immune cells orchestrate the body's repair response following flu infection.
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BPA Exposure in Utero May Increase Predisposition to Breast Cancer
sciencedaily.com - 10-4-11
A recent study accepted for publication in Molecular Endocrinology, a journal of The Endocrine Society, found that perinatal exposure to environmentally relevant doses of bisphenol A (BPA) alters long-term hormone response and breast development in mice that may increase the propensity to develop cancer.
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Fatty Acid Test: Why Some Harm Health, but Others Help
sciencedaily.com - 10-4-11
A major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and other health- and life-threatening conditions, obesity is epidemic in the United States and other developed nations where it's fueled in large part by excessive consumption of a fat-rich "Western diet."
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Cheap medication helps smokers quit
upi.com - 10-3-11
Cytisine, a nicotine substitute, more than triples a person's chances of quitting smoking for at least a year, British and Polish researchers say.
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Elderly in Brazil, S. Africa happier
upi.com - 10-3-11
Older people in South Africa and Brazil become happier as they age, due to innovative social policies addressing poverty and vulnerability, researchers say.
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Purple potatoes lower blood pressure
upi.com - 10-3-11
People who ate purple potatoes cooked in the microwave twice a day for a month lowered their blood pressure by 3 percent to 4 percent, U.S. researchers say.
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Prolonged stress 'can shrink the brain' and even lead to dementia
dailymail.co.uk - 10-3-11
Suffering stress for long periods of time can shrink the brain and even cause dementia, researchers have claimed.
Chemicals released by the body during prolonged stress are toxic to brain tissue, they found.
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How mulberries have as much iron as a sirloin steak
dailymail.co.uk - 10-3-11
A wet, warm autumn means a bumper crop of nuts and berries, packed with nutrients. ANNABEL VENNING speaks to Sarah Wilson, specialist dietician at London’s Princess Grace Hospital, about their health benefits.
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Dietary Supplement Suppresses Immune Attacks In MS
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-3-11
A dietary supplement similar to glucosamine appears to suppress the damaging autoimmune response seen in multiple sclerosis (MS) attacks, raising hopes of a new metabolic therapy for autoimmune diseases. Researchers from the University of California, Irvine (UCI) in the US found that oral N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) stopped abnormal T-cells from growing and working properly: in people with MS, these abnormal cells incorrectly tell the immune system to destroy the tissue that insulates the nerves. You can read a scientific paper about their study in the 29 September online issue of Journal of Biological Chemistry.
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Nurse practitioners were 'Lone Rangers,' founder says
cnn.com - 10-3-11
In rural Boulder County, Colorado, Loretta Ford felt as if she were an epidemiologist, a sanitation department and a health inspector -- but in title, she was a nurse. She and colleagues carried everything, including the baby scales, as they set up temporary clinics in churches, schools and wherever else they could.
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Study: Women genetically tougher
upi.com - 10-3-11
Women were described as the "weaker sex" for centuries, but researchers in Belgium say women are genetically programmed to better resist infections and cancer.
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Small Amount of Exercise Could Protect Against Memory Loss in Elderly, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 10-3-11
A new University of Colorado Boulder study shows that a small amount of physical exercise could profoundly protect the elderly from long-term memory loss that can happen suddenly following infection, illnesses or injury in old age.
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Alcohol Impairs the Body's Ability to Fight Off Viral Infection, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 10-3-11
Alcohol can worsen the effects of disease, resulting in longer recovery period after trauma, injury or burns. It is also known to impair the anti-viral immune response, especially in the liver, including response against Hepatitis C (HCV) and HIV. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Immunology shows that alcohol modulates the anti-viral and inflammatory functions of monocytes and that prolonged alcohol consumption has a double negative effect of reducing the anti-viral effect of Type 1 interferon (IFN) whilst increasing inflammation via the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF?.
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New Factor in HIV Infection Uncovered
sciencedaily.com - 10-3-11
A George Mason University researcher team has revealed the specific process by which the HIV virus infects healthy T cells -- a process previously unknown. The principal investigator, HIV researcher Yuntao Wu, says he hopes this breakthrough will start a new line on inquiry into how researchers can use this knowledge to create drugs that could limit or halt HIV infection.
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New Inherited Neurometabolic Disorder Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 10-3-11
Researchers at the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet have discovered a new inherited disorder that causes severe mental retardation and liver dysfunction. The disease, adenosine kinase deficiency, is caused by mutations in the ADK gene, which codes for the enzyme adenosine kinase.
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Millions of Bees Mysteriously Die in Florida
tampa.cbslocal.com - 10-3-11
Florida officials are abuzz as to how millions of honey bees were killed in Brevard County.
Several beekeepers in the county have reported lost colonies this week. Charles Smith of Smith Family Honey Company told Stuart News Thursday he lost 400 beehives. He says the bees appeared to have been poisoned.
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Hairy, crazy ants invade from Texas to Miss.
yahoo.com - 10-3-11
It sounds like a horror movie: Biting ants invade by the millions. A camper's metal walls bulge from the pressure of ants nesting behind them. A circle of poison stops them for only a day, and then a fresh horde shows up, bringing babies. Stand in the yard, and in seconds ants cover your shoes.
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Recent flooding spawns new wave of aggressive mosquitoes in Vermont
burlingtonfreepress.com - 10-2-11
Flooding from Tropical Storm Irene appears to have spawned a new wave of particularly aggressive mosquitoes in Vermont, keeping the threat of a potentially fatal disease alive well into the fall, according to the state Health Department.
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Expert: Sweden needs 'fat tax'
upi.com - 10-2-11
Sweden should begin taxing saturated fats and sugar, especially sodas and other sweetened soft drinks, a nutritionist said.
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Eggs May Increase Risk Of Lethal Prostate Cancer In Healthy Men
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-2-11
Eating eggs may increase men's risk of developing the more lethal form of prostate cancer, concluded US researchers in a study published recently in the journal Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
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Dietary Supplement Suppresses Immune Attacks In MS
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-2-11
A dietary supplement similar to glucosamine appears to suppress the damaging autoimmune response seen in multiple sclerosis (MS) attacks, raising hopes of a new metabolic therapy for autoimmune diseases. Researchers from the University of California, Irvine (UCI) in the US found that oral N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) stopped abnormal T-cells from growing and working properly: in people with MS, these abnormal cells incorrectly tell the immune system to destroy the tissue that insulates the nerves. You can read a scientific paper about their study in the 29 September online issue of Journal of Biological Chemistry.
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'Magic mushrooms' may raise 'openness'
upi.com - 10-2-11
One high dose of the active ingredient in "magic mushrooms" may measurably and permanently increase "openness" personality traits, U.S. researchers say.
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Cocaine users have increased glaucoma risk
upi.com - 10-2-11
Current and former cocaine users have a 45 percent increased risk of glaucoma, U.S. researchers found.
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U.K. doctors to study benefits of ecstasy
upi.com - 10-2-11
The first clinical study of ecstasy in the United Kingdom is being planned to test the drug's benefits for people suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.
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Halloween Trappings Can Trigger Asthma, Allergies
healthday.com - 10-2-11
Halloween candy may contain some obvious allergens, but there are many more unexpected allergy and asthma triggers that can pose a threat to trick-or-treaters, including dusty costumes, fog machines and makeup, according to experts from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).
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Less Is More for Common Cancer Drug, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 10-2-11
University of Georgia scientists have found that smaller, less toxic amounts of chemotherapy medicine given frequently to mice with human prostate cancer noticeably slowed tumor growth. The mice suffered fewer side effects compared with traditional cancer treatment relying on heavy doses that can cause hair and bone loss.
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'Master Key' to Unlock New Treatments for Autoimmune Disorders Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 10-2-11
Imagine a single drug that would treat most, if not all, autoimmune disorders, such as asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, and Lupus. That might not be so hard to do thanks to a team of researchers who have discovered a molecule normally used by the body to prevent unnecessary immune reactions. This molecule, pronounced "alpha v beta 6," normally keeps our immune systems from overreacting when food passes through our bodies, and it may be the key that unlocks entirely new set of treatments for autoimmune disorders.
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Killer cantaloupe, scary sprouts- what to do?
usatoday.com - 10-1-11
Avoid foreign produce. Wash and peel your fruit. Keep it refrigerated. None of these common tips would have guaranteed your safety from the deadliest food outbreak in a decade, the one involving cantaloupes from Colorado.
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Ciao, I'm from Glasgow! Scottish grandmother suffers stroke - and wakes up with ITALIAN accent
dailymail.co.uk - 10-1-11
Debbie McCann, pictured, has never visited Italy and had a strong Glaswegian accent before the stroke. She has been diagnosed with Foreign Accent Syndrome, which affects just 60 people on the planet. When her voice first came back, she sounded Chinese, although she has not been to China either.
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Good news for red wine lovers - key ingredient halts breast cancer by blocking female hormone
dailymail.co.uk - 10-1-11
A chemical found in red wine can stop breast cancer in its tracks, according to new research.
Laboratory tests have shown resveratrol, which is found in the skin of grapes, could halt the development of the disease by blocking the growth effects of the hormone oestrogen.
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Ecstasy to be used to help war veteransEcstasy to be used to help war veterans
telegraph.co.uk - 10-1-11
Doctors are to use ecstasy to treat people with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in the first British trial of its kind.
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How does a 'sonic scalpel' work?
telegraph.co.uk - 10-1-11
Ultrasound emitted by the harmonic scalpel causes friction in a very limited area, heating up the flesh to about 100C, which both cuts it and seals blood vessels at the same time.
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'Broken penis': Karma for cheating husbands?
msnbc.msn.com - 10-1-11
Affairs may do more than break hearts — they may break penises as well, a new study says.
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Immune System May Influence How Alcohol Affects Behavior
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-1-11
The changes in behavior that come about under the influence of alcohol, such as difficulty controlling muscles for walking and talking, may be influenced by immune cells in the brain, according to a new study from Australia published in the British Journal of Pharmacology this month.
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No Slowing Of Cognitive Decline With Intensive Blood Sugar Control In Type 2 Diabetes
medicalnewstoday.com - 10-1-11
Researchers who compared intensive glucose-lowering treatment with standard glucose control in older patients with type 2 diabetes found that contrary to expectations, super-tight control of blood sugar did not slow the mental decline of diabetes-related dementia, and in the case of their study participants, it was actually linked to a higher rate of death.
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Immigrant/U.S.-born Latino views differ
upi.com - 10-1-11
Latino views differ depending on whether a person is an immigrant or was born in the Unites States, researchers found.
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Low vitamin B linked to cognition problems
upi.com - 10-1-11
Older people with low levels of vitamin B12 in their blood may become more likely to lose brain cells and develop cognition problems, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Peer pressure drives 'sexting'
upi.com - 10-1-11
Teens say the highly sexualized media culture bombards them with sexualized images and creates pressure to engage in sexting, researchers in Australia say.
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Moms may transfer sexist attitudes to kids
upi.com - 10-1-11
A family's socioeconomic and cultural level are associated with sexism but mothers' attitudes may be most influential in promoting it, Spanish researchers said.
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Down Syndrome Brings Joy, Not Regrets, for Many Families
healthday.com - 10-1-11
Louise Borke learned that her infant son had Down Syndrome when he was just a few days old.
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Drug Shortages Even Worse This Year: FDA
healthday.com - 10-1-11
Prescription drug shortages in the United States, which reached a record high last year, are getting worse, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Friday.
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Humans and Sharks Share Immune System Feature
sciencedaily.com - 10-1-11
A central element of the immune system has remained constant through more than 400 million years of evolution, according to new research at National Jewish Health. In the September 29, 2011, online version of the journal Immunity, the researchers report that T-cell receptors from mice continue to function even when pieces of shark, frog and trout receptors are substituted in. The function of the chimeric receptors depends on a few crucial amino acids, found also in humans, that help the T-cell receptor bind to MHC molecules presenting antigens.
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Glucosamine-Like Supplement Suppresses Multiple Sclerosis Attacks, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 10-1-11
A glucosamine-like dietary supplement suppresses the damaging autoimmune response seen in multiple sclerosis, according to a UC Irvine study.
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Early to Bed and Early to Rise: Study Suggests It's Keeping Kids Leaner
sciencedaily.com - 10-1-11
Ben Franklin was right, at least on the healthy part. "Early to bed and early to rise" appears to have helped a cross-section of early-bird Australian youths keep slimmer and more physically active than their night-owl peers, even though both groups got the same amount of sleep.
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Smoking Linked to Chronic Pain in Women
sciencedaily.com - 10-1-11
Kentucky women who smoke heavily may experience more chronic musculoskeletal pain, suggests a new study led by University of Kentucky researchers.
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