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January, 2012 - Herbal and Health News

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Marijuana questions dominate White House online chat -- again
cbsnews.com - 1-31-12
President Obama's live, online chat slated for Monday afternoon is intended to focus on issues raised during last week's State of the Union address -- but his online audience seems to be much more interested in marijuana policy.
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Ketamine: Quick Fix for Severe Depression?
abcnews.go.com - 1-31-12
Ketamine, a prescription drug that has been used as an anesthetic for decades and gained popularity on the street as “Special K,” is being tested in Houston as a quick fix to severe depression.
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Senator's stroke shows they can hit the young, too
usatoday.com - 1-31-12
When a stroke hits at 52, as it did to Sen. Mark Kirk, the reaction is an astonished, "But he's so young."
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A new contraceptive for men on the horizon? Just a couple of zaps of ultrasound kills sperm, say scientists
dailymail.co.uk - 1-31-12
It sounds like one of the more extreme examples of birth control - but blasting a man's most vulnerable area with ultrasound could be the ideal form of male contraception, say scientists.
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Oral HPV Rates Higher In Men Than Women
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-31-12
A study published in JAMA reveals that among men and women between the ages 14 to 69 years in the U.S., the overall prevalence of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is around 7%. In addition, the researchers found that the prevalence of HPV is higher among men than women.
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Military Suicide Rates Rose
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-31-12
According to a study published in the American Journal of Public Health, between 2005 and 2007, suicide rates among individuals serving in U.S. military services increased, particularly among those in the regular Army and National Guard.
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Normal Weight Doctors Discuss Weight Loss With Patients More Often Than Overweight Colleagues
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-31-12
A national cross-sectional survey of 500 primary care physicians in the US finds their weight may influence obesity diagnosis and care. Among the findings, published earlier this month in the journal Obesity, is the suggestion that doctors whose BMI is in the normal weight range are more likely to to discuss weight loss with patients than overweight or obese colleagues.
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Skin transformed into brain cells
bbc.co.uk - 1-31-12
Skin cells have been converted directly into cells which develop into the main components of the brain, by researchers studying mice in California.
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More Newborns Suffering Drug Withdrawal at Birth
healthday.com - 1-31-12
A dramatic rise in newborns experiencing drug withdrawal after being exposed in the womb poses challenges for clinicians on how to detox these tiny victims, a new report indicates.
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Nurturing Moms May Help Their Child's Brain Develop
healthday.com - 1-31-12
Preschool children whose moms are loving and nurturing have a larger hippocampus, an area of the brain involved in learning, memory and stress response, when they reach school age, a new study finds.
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Even Strangers Can Make You Feel Left Out
healthday.com - 1-31-12
The need for a connection to other people is so powerful that being ignored by a stranger can make someone feel left out, according to a new study.
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Addicts' Cravings Have Different Roots in Men and Women
sciencedaily.com - 1-31-12
When it comes to addiction, sex matters. A new brain imaging study by Yale School of Medicine researchers suggests stress robustly activates areas of the brain associated with craving in cocaine-dependent women, while drug cues activate similar brain regions in cocaine-dependent men. The study, expected to be published online Jan. 31 in the American Journal of Psychiatry, suggests men and women with cocaine dependence might benefit more from different treatment options.
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Alcohol and Your Heart: Friend or Foe?
sciencedaily.com - 1-31-12
A meta-analysis done by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) into the relationship between alcohol consumption and heart disease provides new insight into the long-held belief that drinking a glass of red wine a day can help protect against heart disease.
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Divorce Hurts Health More at Earlier Ages
sciencedaily.com - 1-31-12
Divorce at a younger age hurts people's health more than divorce later in life, according to a new study by a Michigan State University sociologist.
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Advice: Stay home when whooping cough hits
upi.com - 1-31-12
Two public school districts in New York's Saratoga County each have two students with confirmed cases of whooping cough, school officials say.
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Cop's Marijuana Legalization Question Gets First Place in White House Video Contest
cisionwire.com - 1-30-12
A question advocating marijuana legalization from a retired LAPD deputy chief of police won twice as many votes as any other video question in the White House's "Your Interview with the President" competition on YouTube this weekend. President Obama is slated to answer some of the top-voted questions on Monday.
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Researchers identify factors linked to menopause onset
usatoday.com - 1-30-12
New genetic factors associated with a woman's age when she begins menopause have been identified by an international team of researchers.
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Enriched skim milk good for gout, study suggests
usatoday.com - 1-30-12
If you have gout, drinking enriched skim milk may help reduce the frequency of painful flare-ups, new research suggests.
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Study shows how stress triggers immune system
usatoday.com - 1-30-12
Shedding some light on why stress might be bad for you, a new study finds that parts of your immune system ramp up when you get into personal conflicts with others.
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Caffeine Alters Estrogen Levels
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-30-12
Researchers at the National Institute of Health, along with other institutions, have released a study online in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, stating that Asian women have higher estrogen levels when drinking 200 milligrams or more of caffeine a day. This is about 2 cups of coffee. On the other hand, white women who drank the same amount tended to have lower estrogen levels than those who did not drink this amount of caffeine. The study goes on to say that African American women who drank equally as much as both the Asian women and the white women also had higher levels of estrogen, but the statistics could not confirm whether this was enough to go by.
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Exploring Insect Brains Reveals Mechanism Behind Associative Memory
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-30-12
A key feature of human and animal brains is that they are adaptive; they are able to change their structure and function based on input from the environment and on the potential associations, or consequences, of that input. For example, if a person puts his hand in a fire and gets burned, he learns to avoid flames; the simple sight of a flame has acquired a predictive value, which in this case, is repulsive. To learn more about such neural adaptability, researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have explored the brains of insects and identified a mechanism by which the connections in their brain change to form new and specific memories of smells.
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How A Parent's Education Can Affect The Mental Health Of Their Offspring
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-30-12
New research sheds light on cycle of low socioeconomic status and depression
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FDA finds fungicide in Brazil, Canada orange juice
cnn.com - 1-30-12
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Friday it had detained shipments of orange juice and concentrate from Brazil and Canada after finding traces of the unapproved fungicide carbendazim.
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Bacterial disguise evades vaccine
bbc.co.uk - 1-30-12
Some bacteria can evade efforts to vaccinate against them by wearing a new disguise, researchers say.
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15% would miss child birth for Super Bowl
upi.com - 1-30-12
Fifteen percent of U.S. adults -- presumably men -- say they'd miss the birth of their child for the Super Bowl, a survey indicates.
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DHEA aids sex function in menopause
upi.com - 1-30-12
Low doses of the hormone DHEA -- dehydroepiandrosterone -- may help sexual function and menopausal symptoms in women, researchers in Italy suggest.
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Teen Driver's Friends Can Be Dangerous Distraction, Studies Find
healthday.com - 1-30-12
Teens who think of themselves as thrill-seekers and who believe their parents don't set rules are among the most likely to drive with other teens in the car, which in many states violates graduated licensing laws, a new study finds.
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Walnuts shrink prostate tumors in mice
upi.com - 1-30-12
Prostate tumors in mice fed the human equivalent of 3 ounces per day of walnuts grew smaller and slower than tumors in control mice, U.S. researchers say.
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Making Memories Last: Prion-Like Protein Plays Key Role in Storing Long-Term Memories
sciencedaily.com - 1-29-12
Memories in our brains are maintained by connections between neurons called "synapses." But how do these synapses stay strong and keep memories alive for decades? Neuroscientists at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have discovered a major clue from a study in fruit flies: Hardy, self-copying clusters or oligomers of a synapse protein are an essential ingredient for the formation of long-term memory.
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Grape Seed Extract Kills Head and Neck Cancer Cells, Leaves Healthy Cells Unharmed
sciencedaily.com - 1-29-12
Nearly 12,000 people will die of head and neck cancer in the United States this year and worldwide cases will exceed half a million.
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Recession causes 2,000 heart attack deaths
telegraph.co.uk - 1-29-12
Since 2002 the number of people dying from heart attacks in England has dropped by half, the study conducted by Oxford University found.
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Too Much Fructose Sweetener Tied to Heart Risks in Teens
healthday.com - 1-29-12
Teens who consume large amounts of the food and beverage sweetener fructose show evidence of cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk in their blood, a new study finds.
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Heart of Silk: Scientists Use Silk from the Tasar Silkworm as a Scaffold for Heart Tissue
sciencedaily.com - 1-29-12
Max Planck scientists have used silk from the tasar silkworm as a scaffold for heart tissue.
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Mystery Illness Leaves Upstate N.Y. Teens With Twitches, Spasms And No Answers
newyork.cbslocal.com - 1-29-12
More than a dozen teens at a high school in upstate New York are suffering from a mystery illness that is leaving them susceptible to twitches and spasms.
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Bed-wetting may be due to constipation
upi.com - 1-29-12
Bed-wetting isn't always due to a bladder issue -- constipation is often the culprit -- U.S. researchers found.
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AMA Paper Proposes Law Forcing People into Experimental Vaccine Trials
naturalsociety.com - 1-29-12
How would you react if I were to tell you that you or your child were forced to participate in experimental vaccine trials? A paper published by the American Medical Association’s Virtual Mentor wants to do just that. It seems that the amount of current participants in current experimental vaccine trials is a bit too low, so why not create a federal law forcing each person to need to “opt-out” of experimental vaccine trials in an attempt to better society?
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Middle-agers dabbling in drugs die sooner
upi.com - 1-28-12
Those in middle-age who still use hard drugs are five times more likely to die earlier than those who don't take drugs, U.S. researchers said.
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New test detects vitamin D more accurately
upi.com - 1-28-12
It's estimated most U.S. adults may be deficient in vitamin D but blood sample testing may yield inaccurate measurements of vitamin D levels, researchers say.
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Hot liquid scalds main cause of kid burns
upi.com - 1-28-12
Hot liquid scalds -- being burned from beverages, soup or food on the stove -- are the No. 1 cause of burns to children, a U.S. burn expert said.
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Legislators ask DEA to reclassify marijuana
seattletimes.com - 1-28-12
A bipartisan group of 42 state lawmakers signed a letter asking the DEA to reschedule marijuana to a classification that could allow it be prescribed and sold in pharmacies.
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Spinal Cord Injury: Helping Injured Dogs Heal
abcnews.go.com - 1-28-12
An experimental drug being tested in dogs with spinal cord injuries could one day help humans, too.
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Multiple Births Can Multiply Mom's Weight
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 1-28-12
Moms have often complained that the more children they have, the harder it becomes to shed the extra pounds gained during pregnancy, and a new mouse study may help explain why.
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati found that mouse moms who gave birth four times were 45 percent heavier than mouse moms who gave birth just once, despite eating similar amounts of food.
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Brain Diseases May Spread from Animals to Humans More Easily than Thought
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 1-28-12
The deadly brain diseases known as prion diseases might pass from one species to another more easily than previously thought, a new study from France finds.
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Could your friends be making you sick? Toxic relationships are linked to cancer, depression and heart disease
dailymail.co.uk - 1-28-12
It may be wise to keep your friends close and your enemies not quite so close, after all.
Relationships may be as vital to good health as a balanced diet and plenty of rest, new research suggests.
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Drinking eight teas a day 'cuts blood pressure and heart disease'
telegraph.co.uk - 1-28-12
But now scientists have found tea really does lower the blood pressure and could prevent heart disease.
Drinking eight cups of black leaf tea, such as Earl Grey or English Breakfast, a day “significantly” cuts blood pressure, researchers at the University of Western Australia found.
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FDA detains some orange juice from Brazil for fungicide
msnbc.msn.com - 1-28-12
U.S. health regulators said on Friday that they had detained three shipments of Brazilian orange juice, and six from Canada, that tested positive for the fungicide carbendazim.
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Rise In Home Births In US
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-28-12
After falling for 14 years, the percentage of home births in the US from 2004 to 2009 rose by 29% to the highest level since data collection on this began in 1989. However, although this looks like a big surge, the overall proportion of American women giving birth at home is still low: in 2004 only 0.56% of births were at home, rising to 0.72% in 2009.
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War of words over looming EPA dioxin study
time.com - 1-28-12
With the EPA's deadline only days away, a war of words has erupted over whether the agency should go ahead with a dioxin study decades in the making.
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Shhhh! The Quiet Joys of the Introvert
time.com - 1-28-12
Spare a thought for the poor introverts among us. In a world of party animals and glad-handers, they’re the ones who stand by the punch bowl. In a world of mixers and pub crawls, they prefer to stay home with a book. Everywhere around them, cell phones ring and e-mails chime and they just want a little quiet.
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Newly recognized neurologic condition
upi.com - 1-28-12
Nodding syndrome is a newly recognized condition with seizure manifestations that affects many young children in some developing nations, U.S. officials said.
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Roswell Park cancer vaccine uses body's own immunity
upi.com - 1-28-12
The Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, N.Y., began a phase I clinical trial of a dendritic cell vaccine that uses the body's immunity to fight cancer.
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Acupuncture May Boost Pregnancy Success Rates
healthday.com - 1-28-12
When a couple is trying to have a baby and can't, it can be emotionally and financially draining. But help may be available in an unexpected form: acupuncture. When a couple is trying to have a baby and can't, it can be emotionally and financially draining. But help may be available in an unexpected form: acupuncture.
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IV Acetaminophen Linked to More Child Overdoses
healthday.com - 1-28-12
Following the U.S. Food Drug Administration's approval last year of an intravenous formulation of acetaminophen for fever and pain in a hospital setting, researchers warn that use of the preparation could lead to serious overdoses, particularly among the youngest patients.
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Too Much Fructose Sweetener Tied to Heart Risks in Teens
healthday.com - 1-28-12
Teens who consume large amounts of the food and beverage sweetener fructose show evidence of cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk in their blood, a new study finds.
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Family History of Psychiatric Disorders Shapes Intellectual Interests, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 1-28-12
A hallmark of the individual is the cultivation of personal interests, but for some people, their intellectual pursuits might actually be genetically predetermined. Survey results published by Princeton University researchers in the journal PLoS ONE suggest that a family history of psychiatric conditions such as autism and depression could influence the subjects a person finds engaging.
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How Viruses Evolve, and in Some Cases, Become Deadly
sciencedaily.com - 1-28-12
Researchers at Michigan State University (MSU) have demonstrated how a new virus evolves, shedding light on how easy it can be for diseases to gain dangerous mutations. The findings appear in the current issue of the journal Science.
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Monsanto’s Infertility-Linked Roundup Found in All Urine Samples Tested
naturalsociety.com - 1-27-12
A recent study conducted by a German university found very high concentrations of Glyphosate, a carcinogenic chemical found in herbicides like Monsanto’s Roundup, in all urine samples tested. The amount of glyphosate found in the urine was staggering, with each sample containing concentrations at 5 to 20-fold the limit established for drinking water. This is just one more piece of evidence that herbicides are, at the very least, being sprayed out of control.
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People who are obese have more pain
upi.com - 1-27-12
A U.S. study of 1 million adults found a clear association between obesity and pain, with the heaviest people having the most pain, researchers found.
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Marijuana Mouth Spray Sativex May Hit Shelves By 2013
stlouis.cbslocal.com - 1-27-12
A British drug manufacturer is hoping for a big score from consumers and a green light from the FDA for its medical marijuana mouth spray in 2013.
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A Ballot Push to Legalize Marijuana, With Alcohol as the Role Model
nytimes.com - 1-27-12
Proponents of marijuana have argued for years that the drug is safer than alcohol, both to individuals and society. But a ballot proposal to legalize possession of marijuana in small amounts in Colorado, likely to be on the November ballot, is putting the two intoxicants back into the same sentence, urging voters to “regulate marijuana like alcohol,” as the ballot proposition’s title puts it.
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Why the nanomaterials in your face cream could be bad for your skin
dailymail.co.uk - 1-27-12
Microscopic nanomaterials used in a fast-growing array of consumer products could be hazardous, say scientists.
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French maritime pine bark extract hailed as new beauty product for women which 'keeps skin elastic'
dailymail.co.uk - 1-27-12
A new wondercream containing tree bark extract may have just brought us one step closer to finding the secret to eternal youth.
The extract, from French maritime pine, could slow down the signs of aging, researchers say.
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Signs of autism at six months
telegraph.co.uk - 1-27-12
Early signs of autism can be detected in babies as young as six months by measuring their brain activity, a study has found for the first time.
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7% Of Americans Have Oral HPV
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-27-12
A study published online in JAMA on Thursday suggests 7% of men and women in the US carry the Human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes a distinct form of cancer that affects the part of the throat that sits at the back of the mouth. The study suggests oral HPV infection is predominantly sexually transmitted, and estimates that men are nearly three times more likely to have the virus than women.
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More Black Tea Lowers Blood Pressure
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-27-12
Tea, the second most consumed drink after water, may help lower blood pressure. Scientists at The University Of Western Australia and Unilever, state in Archives of Internal Medicine, that drinking black tea three times a day may drastically lower a person's systolic and diastolic blood pressure.
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Dating and the challenge of too many choices
cnn.com - 1-27-12
If online dating hasn’t led you to your perfect match, perhaps the issue isn’t that you’re too choosy, but rather that there’s too much choice.
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More U.S. Babies Born at Home: Report
healthday.com - 1-27-12
The rate of home births in the United States has made a dramatic upturn since 2004, reversing a trend of decline throughout the 1990s, government health officials said Thursday.
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Caffeine May Alter Women's Estrogen Levels
healthday.com - 1-27-12
Caffeine changes women's estrogen levels and has different effects in Asian and white women, a new study says.
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Positive thinking, affirmation help health
upi.com - 1-27-12
People can use positive thinking and self-affirmation to help make and sustain behavior change, U.S. researchers said.
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Narcissism health cost higher among men
upi.com - 1-27-12
Narcissism, which is more prevalent among men than women, might have an especially negative effect on the health of men, U.S. researchers said.
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Can tablets give you a pain in the neck?
breitbart.com - 1-27-12
Users of tablet computers should place their device on the table and tilt its screen, rather than have it flat on their lap, to avoid potentially painful hunching of the neck, a study suggested Wednesday.
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Dengue threatens 2.5 billion people
upi.com - 1-27-12
Dengue, a mosquito-borne viral disease, threatens about 2.5 billion people -- more than 40 percent of the world's population -- a U.N. report said.
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High fructose linked to teen heart risk
upi.com - 1-27-12
High fructose consumption may put adolescents at diabetes and cardiovascular risk, U.S. researchers said.
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San Francisco Medical Marijuana Dispensary Licensing Program Suspended Indefinitely
huffingtonpost.com - 1-26-12
San Francisco city officials indefinitely suspended the city's medical marijuana dispensary permitting program on Wednesday, according to the Department of Public Health.
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Study: U.S. marriage offers few benefits
upi.com - 1-26-12
U.S. married couples experience fewer advantages in psychological well-being and social ties than those who cohabit over time, researchers found.
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Studies: Avastin may fight early breast cancers
usatoday.com - 1-26-12
Surprising results from two new studies may reopen debate about the value of Avastin for breast cancer. The drug helped make tumors disappear in certain women with early-stage disease, researchers found.
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People who work 11 hours are twice as likely to suffer depression
telegraph.co.uk - 1-26-12
Researchers found that the odds of a major depressive episode are more than double for those working 11 or more hours a day compared to those working seven to eight hours a day.
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Mystery skin disease Morgellons has no clear cause, CDC study says
msnbc.msn.com - 1-26-12
A strange disease in which sufferers say they find fibers, fuzz and other debris sprouting from sores on their skin is not contagious and has no clear cause, the largest-ever study of the condition called Morgellons has found.
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Iodine Usage In Scans Affects Thyroid Function
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-26-12
Using iodinated contrast media in imaging scans has been linked to alterations in thyroid function, which in turn raises the risk of developing hyperthyroidism, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, reported in Archives of Internal Medicine. The authors explained that iodinated contrast media are utilized in imaging procedures and scans, such as CT scans and cardiac catheterization.
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Brown Fat - Keeps You Warm And Keeps You Slim
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-26-12
People with more brown fat seem better able to stay warm when it is cold, Canadian researchers reported in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. They added that the findings of their study could eventually be used to find ways of fighting obesity. Not much has been known about brown fat, a type of good fat, until recently.
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Over 55s More Active Than Younger People
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-26-12
According to survey by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), individuals aged 55+ are more active than the younger generation. Results from the survey revealed that people over the age of 55 do around 28 minutes more physical activity per week than their 18 to 25 year-old counterparts.
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Lyme disease risk from dogs 'higher than thought'
bbc.co.uk - 1-26-12
Ticks that can transmit Lyme disease may be more prevalent in the UK than realised, say researchers who have found out how many dogs harbour them.
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Common chemical may affect child vaccines
upi.com - 1-26-12
A chemical used in non-stick cookware, waterproof clothing and fast-food packaging might interfere with child vaccinations, U.S. researchers said.
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Lifetime of puzzles stave Alzheimer's
upi.com - 1-26-12
A lifetime of crossword puzzles, Sudoku and other cognitively stimulating activities may help stave off Alzheimer's in old age, U.S. researchers suggested.
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Active Ingredient in Viagra Shrunk Disfiguring Growths in Kids
healthday.com - 1-26-12
A new preliminary report suggests that the active ingredient in Viagra, sildenafil, could reduce the size of large growths that can disfigure the bodies of children.
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Men at Higher Risk for Mental Decline That Precedes Alzheimer's
healthday.com - 1-26-12
Subtle problems with memory and thinking skills -- known as mild cognitive impairment -- often precede Alzheimer's disease, and a new study finds that men are at higher risk for these troubles than women.
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Researchers Quantify Muscle Soreness
sciencedaily.com - 1-26-12
Quantifying how sore a person is after a long workout is a challenge for doctors and researchers, but scientists from Loma Linda and Asuza Pacific Universities think they may have figured it out. Their research article describing a new technique to measure muscle soreness will be published in the Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE).
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The Price of Your Soul: How the Brain Decides Whether to 'Sell Out'
sciencedaily.com - 1-26-12
A neuro-imaging study shows that personal values that people refuse to disavow, even when offered cash to do so, are processed differently in the brain than those values that are willingly sold.
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Fried food heart risk 'a myth'
telegraph.co.uk - 1-26-12
It is a "myth" that regularly eating fried foods causes heart attacks, researchers have found, as long as you use olive oil or sunflower oil.
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Magic Mushrooms For Depression
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-25-12
It seems the tide of opinion against illegal drugs is turning once again with scientists proclaiming that the Psilocybin Mushroom, popular with party goers and better known as Shrooms or Magic Mushrooms, should be successful for treating people with depression.
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U.S. diabetes amputations down
upi.com - 1-25-12
Lower-limb amputations among U.S. adults age 40 and older with diagnosed diabetes dropped 65 percent from 1996 to 2008, federal health officials say.
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Pets a big help to women with HIV/AIDS
upi.com - 1-25-12
Middle-age women with HIV/AIDS find support and pleasure from their pets, U.S. researchers say.
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Microwave Popcorn Bag Pollutants Make Vaccines Less Effective
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 1-25-12
A group of compounds used in a variety of products, including water-resistant clothing and microwave popcorn, may prevent childhood vaccinations from working properly, a new study says.
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HIV gum test 'just as effective as traditional blood screening'
dailymail.co.uk - 1-25-12
A gum swab test used to diagnose HIV is just as accurate as the traditional blood screening, according to a new study. Researchers at McGill University, Quebec, who compared five worldwide studies, found it was 99 per cent accurate for HIV in high risk populations and 97 per cent accurate in low risk populations.
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England's Doctors Seeing More Cases Of Vitamin D Deficiency
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-25-12
Reports are coming in that England's doctors are seeing more cases of Vitamin D deficiency, with at least one expert describing the issue as a major problem.
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Narcissistic Men May Pay With Their Health
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-25-12
Men with an inflated view of their importance, who are incapable of putting themselves in other people's shoes and who see themselves as "special" and superior to others, some of the traits of a narcissistic personality, may pay for this with their health. This is because a new study suggests even when such men are not under stress, they have high levels of cortisol in their bloodstream, increasing their risk for developing cardiovascular problems. The study was published online on 23 January in PLoS ONE.
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Lifelong Active Brains Have Fewer Deposits Of Alzheimer's Protein
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-25-12
A new study using PET scans to to examine the brains of healthy older people finds those who have been mentally stimulated all their lives, doing things like reading, writing, and playing games and puzzles, have fewer deposits of beta-amyloid, a destructive protein that is a hallmark of Alzheimer's Disease. The researchers suggest their findings will encourage scientists to think differently about how mental stimulation affects the biology of the brain.
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Advanced Cell Technology: Stem cell retinal implants safe
bbc.co.uk - 1-25-12
Early results from the world's first human trial using embryonic stem cells to treat diseases of the eye suggest the method is safe, say researchers.
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Menopause onset may be genetic
upi.com - 1-25-12
Researchers from the Boston University Schools of Public Health and Medicine report they have found 13 genetic locations linked to the onset of menopause.
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Lifestyle blamed for 40 percent of cancers
upi.com - 1-25-12
Forty percent of cancers in women and 45 percent in men could be prevented by a healthier lifestyle, British researchers say.
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Common Household Chemicals Might Harm Kids' Immunity
healthday.com - 1-25-12
Exposure to high levels of a group of common household chemicals may impair children's immunity, a new study suggests.
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Entry Point for Hepatitis C Infection Identified
sciencedaily.com - 1-25-12
A molecule embedded in the membrane of human liver cells that aids in cholesterol absorption also allows the entry of hepatitis C virus, the first step in hepatitis C infection, according to research at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine.
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Lifelong Brain-Stimulating Habits Linked to Lower Alzheimer's Protein Levels
sciencedaily.com - 1-25-12
A new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, provides even more reason for people to read a book or do a puzzle, and to make such activities a lifetime habit.
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U.S.: 1-in-5 had mental illness last year
upi.com - 1-24-12
Almost 46 million U.S. adults age 18 or older, about 20 percent of that age group, experienced mental illness during the past year, health officials say.
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Marijuana mouth spray seeks FDA approval as painkiller
cbsnews.com - 1-24-12
A marijuana-based mouth spray may get FDA approval as soon as 2013 - at least that's what British manufactuer GW Pharma hopes. The company is in advanced clinical trials on the world's first pharmaceutical developed from raw marijuana plants.
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Judge: Montana’s medical marijuana law doesn’t shield providers from federal prosecution
washingtonpost.com - 1-24-12
A judge has ruled that Montana’s medical marijuana law doesn’t shield providers of the drug from federal prosecution, delivering a new blow to an industry reeling from a state and federal crackdown.
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Early Brain Changes May Indicate Dyslexia
abcnews.go.com - 1-24-12
A group of researchers say they may be close to finding a way to resolve what’s known as the “dyslexia paradox”: the fact that the earlier a child is diagnosed with dyslexia, the easier it is to treat, but because the disorder is characterized by difficulty in reading and speaking, it is not typically diagnosed until a child reaches third grade, which many experts consider to be late.
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Sponge-type particles safe for nosebleed treatment
usatoday.com - 1-24-12
Whether it happens because of sneezing, a vigorous blow, dry air, getting hit square in the face with a ball or simply because of, shall we say, some active manual extraction, most of us have experienced a bloody nose at least once.
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The ultimate cat scan! 'My kitten alerted me to my cancer because she kept jumping on my breast'
dailymail.co.uk - 1-24-12
A woman claims her pet cat saved her life - by alerting her to her breast cancer when she was just a whisker from death.
Wendy Humphreys, 52, was bemused when her black-and-white kitten Fidge leapt up and sat on her right breast every night for two weeks while she lay on the sofa.
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Meth fills hospitals with burn patients
msnbc.msn.com - 1-24-12
A crude new method of making methamphetamine poses a risk even to Americans who never get anywhere near the drug: It is filling hospitals with thousands of uninsured burn patients requiring millions of dollars in advanced treatment — a burden so costly that it's contributing to the closure of some burn units.
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Gilenya (Multiple-Sclerosis Drug) - May Pose Health Risk
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-24-12
The risks and benefits of Gilenya, a medication for multiple-sclerosis, is currently under review by the European Medicines Agency, after one patient in the U.S. died less than 24 hours after the first dose (the exact cause of death is still unknown), and other reports of heart problems in patients taking the medication.
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Child Obesity Linked To Chemical Phthalates
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-24-12
According to a study published online in the journal Environmental Research, a connection has been found between obesity in young children - including waist circumference and increased body mass index (BMI) - and exposure to the chemical group known as phthalates, by investigators from the Children's Environmental Health Center at The Mount Sinai Medical Center.
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Autism Overdiagnosed? Possibly, Because Many Children Seem To "Outgrow" It
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-24-12
Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) come with several neurodevelopmental signs and symptoms which overlap other conditions - it is possible that some early ASD diagnoses are wrong, especially among children who no longer meet the criteria for ASD as they get older, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health wrote in the journal Pediatrics. The authors add that it is not easy for doctors to diagnose between several possibilities early in life.
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Females More Sensitive To Pain Than Males? Possibly
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-24-12
The idea that men suffer more when in pain than women could well be a myth, according to a new report written by Stanford University researchers in the Journal of Pain. The authors say that their large study found that even though women are able to endure childbirth, an ordeal that males never have to go through, their findings showed that overall, males appear to endure pain better than women.
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Magic mushrooms may be therapeutic
cnn.com - 1-24-12
Rave-goers and visitors to Amsterdam before December 2008 may be intimately familiar with magic mushrooms, but there's little scientific knowledge on what happens to the brain while tripping.
Now it appears that more research is warranted. A growing number of studies suggested that perhaps the mushrooms' key ingredient could work magic for certain mental disorders.
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Advanced Cell Technology: Stem cell retinal implants safe
bbc.co.uk - 1-24-12
Early results from the world's first human trial using embryonic stem cells to treat diseases of the eye suggest the method is safe, say researchers.
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How the Brain Senses Nutrient Balance
sciencedaily.com - 1-24-12
There is no doubt that eating a balanced diet is essential for maintaining a healthy body weight as well as appropriate arousal and energy balance, but the details about how the nutrients we consume are detected and processed in the brain remain elusive. Now, a research study discovers intriguing new information about how dietary nutrients influence brain cells that are key regulators of energy balance in the body.
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Researchers Develop Gene Therapy That Could Correct a Common Form of Blindness
sciencedaily.com - 1-24-12
A new gene therapy method developed by University of Florida researchers has the potential to treat a common form of blindness that strikes both youngsters and adults. The technique works by replacing a malfunctioning gene in the eye with a normal working copy that supplies a protein necessary for light-sensitive cells in the eye to function.
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Expert: Frequent mammograms not justified
upi.com - 1-24-12
A Danish researcher says frequent breast cancer screenings via mammograms for women ages 50-70 may do more harm than good.
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U.S. has highest teen pregnancy rate
upi.com - 1-24-12
The U.S. teen birth rate is the highest in the developed world with about 400,000 infants being born to mothers ages 15-19 every year, federal officials say.
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Dual smokers have different profile
upi.com - 1-23-12
Dual smokers -- people who smoke cigarettes and cigars -- fit a different profile than cigarette-only smokers, a U.S. public health organization says.
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Marijuana-based drug Sativex may get FDA approval
nydailynews.com - 1-23-12
A quarter-century after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first prescription drugs based on the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, additional medicines derived from or inspired by the cannabis plant itself could soon be making their way to pharmacy shelves, according to drug companies, small biotech firms and university scientists.
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Therapy can add years to certain brain tumor patients' lives
usatoday.com - 1-23-12
The growing science of personalized medicine has good news for a select group of brain tumor patients: Combination therapy can double their survival, to nearly15 years.
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Deadliest Skin Cancer Hides in Plain Sight, Study Finds
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 1-23-12
More people survive melanoma now than in generations past, but the death rate of one type of melanoma has not budged for the past 30 years, a new study shows.
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Thousands of women whose mothers were prescribed the common pregnancy drug DES are unaware they are at greater risk of a number of cancers, according to experts.
dailymail.co.uk - 1-23-12
Four patients are dying hungry and thirsty on hospital wards every day, shocking figures reveal.
Dehydration or malnutrition directly caused or was linked to 1,316 deaths last year in NHS trusts and privately run hospitals.
The revelation follows a series of damning reports accusing staff of failing to address the most basic needs of the vulnerable, particularly the elderly.
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'Silent Thalidomide': Thousands of mothers and their daughters at risk of cancer from anti-miscarriage drugs they took decades ago
dailymail.co.uk - 1-23-12
Thousands of women whose mothers were prescribed the common pregnancy drug DES are unaware they are at greater risk of a number of cancers, according to experts.
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Chefs, butlers, marble baths: Hospitals vie for the affluent
msnbc.msn.com - 1-23-12
The feverish patient had spent hours in a crowded emergency room. When she opened her eyes in her Manhattan hospital room last winter, she recalled later, she wondered if she could be hallucinating: “This is like the Four Seasons — where am I?”
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Poorer Outcomes For Patients Who Suffer Delirium After Stroke
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-23-12
Delirium develops in about 30 percent of patients hospitalized shortly after a stroke and is linked to poorer outcomes, according to a new meta-analysis published in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.
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Researchers Believe That Physical Exercise Has Been Downgraded For Norwegian Children
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-23-12
Youngsters in Norway today are not as fit as earlier generations, and even the best perform less well. Researchers now warn that a wave of inactivity could have a major long-term health impact.
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Key Role Grandmothers Play In Mother And Child Nutrition And Health Highlighted By Research
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-23-12
Grandmothers and other senior female family members should play a key role in nutrition and health programmes for children and women in non-Western societies. However, they are often overlooked by health organisations that don't understand the importance of their role or see them as an obstacle to promoting good nutrition and health practices.
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Nanoparticle trick 'boosts body's vaccine response'
bbc.co.uk - 1-23-12
Tiny capsules engineered to mimic part of the body's immune system could strengthen its response to vaccines, say researchers.
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Avoid Getting Scorched by 'Hot Yoga'
healthday.com - 1-23-12
Doing yoga in a room heated to between 90 and 105 degrees -- known as "hot yoga" -- is increasing in popularity, but it may not be for everyone, an expert warns.
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T-Rays Technology Could Help Develop Star Trek-Style Hand-Held Medical Scanners
sciencedaily.com - 1-23-12
Scientists have developed a new way to create Terahertz waves (T-rays) that may one day lead to biomedical detective devices similar to the 'tricorder' scanner used in Star Trek.
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Old method to ease back pain now popular
naturalsociety.com - 1-23-12
A little known European holistic technique that relieves back pain, dating back to the 1890s, is gaining popularity in the United States, fitness experts say.
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Monsanto’s Best-Selling Herbicide Roundup Linked to Infertility
naturalsociety.com - 1-23-12
A recent study has found that Monsanto’s Roundup pesticide may be responsible for causing infertility. After reviewing the many already well-documented negative impacts Roundup has on the environment and living creatures, it is no surprise to add yet another item to the list.
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Couples happier with couples as friends
upi.com - 1-22-12
Married couples who form and keep friendships with other couples often have happier marriages, a U.S. researcher says.
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Study hints that statins might fight breast cancer
usatoday.com - 1-22-12
Amid hints that statins -- cholesterol-lowering drugs -- might also play a role in preventing or treating certain types of cancer, new research sheds some light on how these drugs may help stop breast cancer in its tracks among certain women.
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Gold coils are the latest weapon in prostate cancer war
dailymail.co.uk - 1-22-12
Doctors are arming themselves with a precious new weapon in the fight against prostate cancer – gold.
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America's most stressful cities in 2012
msnbc.msn.com - 1-22-12
With common factors such as traffic, crowds, noise, grime, and crime, cities are generally not perceived as oases of calm.
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Bad bosses: The Psycho-path to Success?
cnn.com - 1-22-12
Think you suffer from a "psycho" boss? A small but growing body of global research suggests you might be right.
Call it the "Psycho-path to Success."
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Texting, Talking on Cellphone Slows Walking Pace: Study
healthday.com - 1-22-12
Talking on a cellphone or texting while walking slows you down and makes it difficult to walk in a straight line, researchers report.
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Manganese May Have Potential in Neutralizing Deadly Shiga Toxin
sciencedaily.com - 1-22-12
Carnegie Mellon University researchers have discovered that an element commonly found in nature might provide a way to neutralize the potentially lethal effects of a compound known as Shiga toxin. New results published in the Jan. 20 issue of Science by Carnegie Mellon biologists Adam Linstedt and Somshuvra Mukhopadhyay show that manganese completely protects against Shiga toxicosis in animal models.
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High Levels of MRSA Bacteria in U.S. Retail Meat Products, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 1-22-12
Retail pork products in the U.S. have a higher prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (MRSA) than previously identified, according to new research by the University of Iowa College of Public Health and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy.
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Fall asleep after sex may block commitment
upi.com - 1-22-12
A tendency to fall asleep before one's partner after sex may be a non-conscious way to block any commitment conversation, U.S. researchers suggest.
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CDC: Imported skin cream contains mercury
upi.com - 1-22-12
U.S. health officials say mercury exposure was reported among users of skin-lightening creams produced Mexico.
Health officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta said mercury exposure can result in irreversible renal and central nervous system damage or death.
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Can coffee really thwart type 2 diabetes?
usatoday.com - 1-21-12
Your morning "cup of Joe" may do more than deliver the jolt you need to get going -- it may also help you stave off type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests.
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Substance found in nuts may thwart food poisoning
msnbc.msn.com - 1-21-12
A substance found in nuts and whole grains may someday help doctors fight the kind of food poisoning that sickened thousands of people in Europe last summer, a study in mice suggests.
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Tiny Amounts of Alcohol Dramatically Extend a Worm's Life, but Why?
sciencedaily.com - 1-21-12
Minuscule amounts of ethanol, the type of alcohol found in alcoholic beverages, can more than double the life span of a tiny worm known as Caenorhabditis elegans, which is used frequently as a model in aging studies, UCLA biochemists report. The scientists said they find their discovery difficult to explain.
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Cord blood stem cells may restore hearing
upi.com - 1-21-12
U.S. researchers are undergoing a phase I safety study using a child's umbilical cord blood stem cells to try to restore hearing loss.
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LAUSD Students Roundly Reject Healthier School Lunch Menu
cbslocal.com - 1-21-12
The revamped school lunches at Los Angeles Unified School District have won awards, commending them for improving the menu at the second largest school district in the nation. Too bad the students don’t agree.
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Mild Dehydration Triggers Moodiness & Fatigue in Women
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 1-21-12
Being even slightly dehydrated is enough to cause moodiness, problems concentrating, headaches and fatigue, a new study has concluded.
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Helping Dogs (and Humans) With Spinal Cord Injury Walk Again
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-21-12
On Wednesday, US researchers announced they are testing a new drug in dogs that has already proven effective in mice. The drug is designed to substantially reduce the hind limb paralysis that follows certain spinal cord injuries. There are currently no therapies that can do this. The researchers suggest if the drug succeeds in dogs, it could also work in humans.
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1 In 5 Americans With Mental Illness, National Survey
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-21-12
Some 45.9 million, or around 1 in 5 American adults (age 18 and over) experienced a mental illness in the past year, according to the US government's latest National Survey on Drug Use and Health, released this month.
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Ending the Autism Epidemic: If the Definition Changes, Will Some Kids Lose Services?
time.com - 1-21-12
Parents and experts are wondering how a proposed change to the official definition of autism — as contained in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), the standard mental-health reference guide maintained by the American Psychiatric Association — would affect the services their children receive and the research dollars allocated to study the mysteries of an increasingly common condition that is believed to affect 1 in 110 people.
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Johnson & Johnson settles $158m US Medicaid fraud case
bbc.co.uk - 1-21-12
Johnson & Johnson has settled for $158m (£102m) over allegations that a subsidiary defrauded a state healthcare programme in the US state of Texas.
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Scientists Agree to Delay Controversial Bird Flu Research
healthday.com - 1-21-12
Scientists agreed Friday to a 60-day moratorium on controversial research into a modified avian flu virus that has been shown to be more transmissible among mammals.
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Breast Cancer Before 50 Linked to More Distress
healthday.com - 1-21-12
Younger women with breast cancer may experience a decrease in their health-related quality of life because of increased mental distress, weight gain and other factors, a new study finds.
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Tanning Salon Tax No Deterrent: Study
healthday.com - 1-21-12
A 10 percent federal tax, imposed on tanning salons in 2010 as part of the U.S. Affordable Care Act, does not seem to deter those who like the bronzed look all year long, a new study finds.
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Low birth weight linked to autism
upi.com - 1-21-12
Low birth weight is an important environmental factor contributing to the risk of autism spectrum disorder, U.S. researchers say.
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Superfoods boost a diet, so do other foods
upi.com - 1-20-12
A British dietitian says people should not limit their diet to the 14 foods listed in the popular book, "SuperFoods: 14 Foods that Will Change Your Life."
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Study: Women more at risk of mental illness than men
msnbc.msn.com - 1-20-12
One in five American adults, or nearly 50 million people, suffered mental illness in the past year with women and young adults more susceptible, a government report released on Thursday found.
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Sex poses surprisingly low risk to heart patients
msnbc.msn.com - 1-20-12
Good news: Sex is safe for most heart patients. If you're healthy enough to walk up two flights of stairs without chest pain or gasping for breath, you can have a love life.
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Bird Flu Kills Duck Farmer In Vietnam And Toddler In Cambodia
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-20-12
On Thursday the Vietnamese authorities reported that a duck farmer has died of bird flu, coinciding with reports that a two-year-old boy in Cambodia has also died of the virus this week.
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Tumors Continue Growing Even When Cells Get Old
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-20-12
Based on the knowledge that cancer cells grow indefinitely, the general belief is that senescence could act as a barrier against tumor growth and has the potential of being used as a cancer treatment.
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Depression drugs ‘causing falls’
bbc.co.uk - 1-20-12
Elderly people with dementia are more likely to suffer falls if they are given anti-depressants by care home staff, a study claims.
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Bipolar Drug May Spur Weight Gain, Thyroid Problems: Review
healthday.com - 1-20-12
A new medical review finds that lithium, a common treatment for bipolar disorder, can lead to weight gain and causes high rates of abnormalities in the thyroid and parathyroid glands.
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More Than Half of Teens Who Gave Birth Weren't Using Contraception: CDC
healthday.com - 1-20-12
Slightly more than half of U.S. teenaged girls who had a child between 2004 and 2008 did not use birth control, and a third didn't think they could get pregnant at the time, a new government study finds.
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Enhancing Cognition in Older Adults Also Changes Personality
sciencedaily.com - 1-20-12
A program designed to boost cognition in older adults also increased their openness to new experiences, researchers report, demonstrating for the first time that a non-drug intervention in older adults can change a personality trait once thought to be fixed throughout the lifespan.
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Environmental Exposure to Organochlorines May Impact Male Reproduction
sciencedaily.com - 1-20-12
Melissa Perry, Sc.D., M.H.S., professor and chair of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at the GW School of Public Health and Health Services and adjunct associate professor at the Harvard School of Public Health, led an observational study indicating that environmental exposure to organochlorine chemicals, including Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) and p,p'-DDE (the main metabolite of the insecticide DDT) can affect male reproduction.
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Armed conflict linked to low birth weight
upi.com - 1-20-12
Pregnant women exposed to armed conflict have a higher risk than others of giving birth to babies who are under weight, U.S. researchers say.
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Farmer feeds GMO corn to his pigs: they all become sterile - Video (12:46)
youtube.com - 1-20-12
Jerry Rosman, a pig farmer in Iowa, was cultivating GMO corn,(Roundup Ready and BT) and fed this corn to his pigs. Result: his sows became infertile, and then after one year he went bankrupt.
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Good intentions can soothe pain
upi.com - 1-19-12
Patients might have less pain if doctors and nurses brush up on their bedside manner and show compassion and good intentions, U.S. researchers say.
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One-in-4 in U.S. have high blood pressure
upi.com - 1-19-12
One-in-four U.S. adults -- about 55 million Americans -- were treated for high blood pressure in 2008, federal health officials say.
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Sleep Locks In Bad Memories, Emotions
abcnews.go.com - 1-19-12
Sleeping after a traumatic event might lock in bad memories and emotions, a new study has found.
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G-Spot: Science Can't Find It After 60 Years, Study Says
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 1-19-12
Many women swear they have one, but a new review of 60 years of sex research shows science still can't definitively find the G-spot.
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Mediterranean diet 'halves risk of Parkinson's disease'
dailymail.co.uk - 1-19-12
A Mediterranean-style diet rich in fruit, vegetables and fish can almost halve the risk of Parkinson's disease, according to new research.
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Mothers warned drinking during seventh to 12th week of pregnancy puts unborn babies at highest risk of foetal alcohol syndrome
dailymail.co.uk - 1-19-12
Drinking regularly during pregnancy is known to increase the odds of having children with foetal alcohol syndrome.
However, scientists have now found that the risk to a woman's baby is highest if they consume alcohol in the seventh to 12th week.
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Abortion rates higher where it's illegal
msnbc.msn.com - 1-19-12
Abortion rates are higher in countries where the procedure is illegal and nearly half of all abortions worldwide are unsafe, with the vast majority in developing countries, a new study concludes.
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Caffeine Therapy Does Not Help Preterm Babies Long Term
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-19-12
According to an investigation published in the January 18 issue of JAMA, caffeine therapy, which has been demonstrated to lower the rate of cognitive delay and cerebral palsy at 18 months, did not considerably improve the rate of survival without disability at 5 years of age among very low birth weight infants with apnea.
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Obesity In Children - Virtually Unchanged In U.S.
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-19-12
Two investigations being published by JAMA reveal that the prevalence of obesity in the United States has not changed considerably. Approximately 1 in 3 adults and 1 in 6 children and adolescents are obese according to data from 2009-2010. The data also revealed that the prevalence of obesity in certain demographics has increased.
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Malignant Melanoma Recurrence - How To Avoid It After Targeted Treatment
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-19-12
According to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers at The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) have demonstrated how to prevent new cancers that can occur when malignant melanoma patients are treated with drugs known as BRAF inhibitors.
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Gossip may have social purpose, study says
cnn.com - 1-19-12
"Did you hear what she did?" "Guess what I just found out about our new co-worker!" These could be the starts of nasty rumors, but a new study suggests the act of gossiping can also serve important purposes in maintaining social order.
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Meningitis jab ‘protection hope’
bbc.co.uk - 1-19-12
A vaccine against one of the most common forms of childhood meningitis could reduce the number of deaths in the UK even further.
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The pill 'does ease period pain'
bbc.co.uk - 1-19-12
Oral contraceptives may alleviate painful periods for some women, suggests a 30-year study.
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U.S. obesity levels may be leveling
upi.com - 1-19-12
Adult obesity increased from 1980 to 1999, but the number of those more than 30 pounds overweight may have leveled off in 2009-2010, U.S. researchers say.
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Black doctors better at unspoken language
upi.com - 1-19-12
Black physicians outperform their white colleagues in using positive non-verbal communication in interactions with patients, U.S. researchers say.
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New Drug Combo for Hepatitis C Shows Promise
healthday.com - 1-19-12
A new cocktail of two investigational drugs appears to have successfully cleared the hepatitis C virus in people who don't respond to standard treatment.
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Melanoma Drug's Link to Other Skin Cancers Identified
healthday.com - 1-19-12
The recently approved drug vemurafenib (Zelboraf) has been hailed as a breakthrough in the treatment of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. But roughly one-quarter of patients who take the medication develop a troublesome side effect: secondary skin cancers called squamous cell carcinomas.
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Broken Arm? Brain Shifts Quickly When Using a Sling or Cast
sciencedaily.com - 1-19-12
Using a sling or cast after injuring an arm may cause your brain to shift quickly to adjust, according to a study published in the January 17, 2012, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study found increases in the size of brain areas that were compensating for the injured side, and decreases in areas that were not being used due to the cast or sling.
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Diet Counts: Iron Intake in Teen Years Can Impact Brain in Later Life
sciencedaily.com - 1-19-12
Iron is a popular topic in health news. Doctors prescribe it for medical reasons, and it's available over the counter as a dietary supplement. And while it's known that too little iron can result in cognitive problems, it's also known that too much promotes neurodegenerative diseases.
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Why Coffee Drinking Reduces the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes
sciencedaily.com - 1-19-12
Why do heavy coffee drinkers have a lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, a disease on the increase around the world that can lead to serious health problems? Scientists are offering a new solution to that long-standing mystery in a report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry.
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Nicotine Patch Shows Benefits in Mild Cognitive Impairment, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 1-19-12
Using a nicotine patch may help improve mild memory loss in older adults, according to a study published in the January 10, 2012, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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Prescription medication 'increases falls in all ages'
telegraph.co.uk - 1-18-12
People who take two or more prescription drugs could be twice as likely to take a serious fall regardless of their age, research suggests.
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Solved - the mystery of why teenagers are so moody: Their brains go into overdrive when they enjoy something
dailymail.co.uk - 1-18-12
Teenagers are prone to being moody, self-centred and reckless because their brains function differently when they do something they enjoy, say scientists.
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Study: No alcohol intake safe during pregnancy
usatoday.com - 1-18-12
It's known that drinking during pregnancy leaves babies vulnerable to a spectrum of abnormalities called fetal alcohol syndrome. Now, a new study pinpoints the latter half of the first trimester as a critical time in the development of some of the syndrome's most telling physical characteristics.
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Daily dose of rosehip extract could help cut heart disease by lowering blood pressure and cholesterol levels
dailymail.co.uk - 1-18-12
A daily dose of the herbal remedy rose hip could cut the risk of heart disease, new research shows.
Obese patients who consumed a drink made with rose hip powder every day for just six weeks saw their blood pressure and cholesterol levels drop significantly.
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Problems in the bedroom? It could be because your partner gets on too well with your friends
dailymail.co.uk - 1-18-12
Men whose girlfriends are too friendly with their mates suffer in the bedroom, researchers say.
A study by Cornell University found that older men who do all their socialising alongside their other halves are more likely to suffer from erectile dysfunction.
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Serious Injuries To Pedestrians Wearing Headphones More Than Tripled In Six Years, US Study
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-18-12
A review of pedestrian injuries and deaths from crashes with trains and motor vehicles in the United States where the victim was wearing headphones finds that incidents of serious injury have more than tripled in the last six years. The reviewers conclude that pedestrians who use headphones while walking about near traffic may be putting themselves at risk and they urge this be investigated further.
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Knee Replacements Soar Among The Under-60s, Finland
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-18-12
A new study published online on 17 January in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism reports that rates of knee replacement surgery in Finland's 30 to 59-year-olds soared between 1980 and 2006, with women being the more common recipients throughout. Lead author Dr. Jarkko Leskinen, an orthopedic surgeon at Helsinki University Central Hospital, and colleagues also report that the greatest increase was among those aged between 50 and 59.
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U.S obesity rates unchanged
cnn.com - 1-18-12
The prevalence of obesity in the United States seems to have plateaued, according to data released Tuesday. The numbers show 35.7% of U.S. adults and almost 17% of U.S. children and teens are obese.
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Potatoes added to school's allergy list
upi.com - 1-18-12
Along with nuts and eggs, a Canadian school has asked parents to keep all potato products out of lunches and snacks because one student is allergic to them.
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Coffee helps people focus, causes headache
upi.com - 1-18-12
Coffee may clear mental cobwebs and help people concentrate -- but it may also cause unwanted headaches -- a U.S. researcher says.
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U.S. Wants to Buttress Alzheimer's Arsenal by 2025
healthday.com - 1-18-12
With the Alzheimer's epidemic predicted to reach crisis proportions as the U.S. population ages, a panel of experts is meeting for two days to draft a plan to combat a disease that is fast emerging as one of the nation's biggest -- and costliest -- health threats.
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Experimental Blood Thinner Given Before Surgery Shows Benefit
healthday.com - 1-18-12
An experimental anti-blood-clotting drug can serve as a replacement for other drugs such as Plavix in the days before heart surgery, a new study has found.
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'Upper Normal' Blood Pressure Linked to Heart Risk in Men
healthday.com - 1-18-12
Middle-aged men with blood pressure in the upper-normal range are at increased risk for atrial fibrillation later in life, researchers say.
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Inflammation in Depression: Chicken or Egg?
sciencedaily.com - 1-18-12
An important ongoing debate in the field of psychiatry is whether inflammation in the body is a consequence of or contributor to major depression. A new study in Biological Psychiatry has attempted to resolve the issue.
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Older women who lose height may die sooner
upi.com - 1-17-12
Women age 65 and older who have lost more than 2 inches in height face an increased risk of breaking bones and dying, U.S. researchers say.
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La Nina weather precedes flu pandemics
upi.com - 1-17-12
U.S. scientists theorize that altered migration patterns of birds due to La Nina weather patterns in the equatorial Pacific promote new strains of influenza.
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Teen brains exposed to alcoholism differ
upi.com - 1-17-12
Early adolescents with a family history of alcoholism experience "weaker brain response during risky decision-making" than others, U.S. researchers report.
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Drug companies to disclose doctor payments
upi.com - 1-17-12
Healthcare reform legislation enacted in 2010 requires drug companies to disclose payments made to physicians who are not their employees, U.S. officials say.
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Women Suffer From Sleep Apnea, Raised Heart Risks, Too
healthday.com - 1-17-12
Just as it does in men, obstructive sleep apnea can raise the risk for women of dying from heart attacks and having other cardiovascular problems, a new Spanish study indicates.
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Injuries to Pedestrians Wearing Headphones Tripled Since 2004
healthday.com - 1-17-12
Folks who walk to work or school while listening to music via headphones may want to unplug, with a new U.S. study finding injuries to this group of people tripling since 2004.
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World first as British surgeons use robotic arm for heart operation
dailymail.co.uk - 1-17-12
British doctors have saved a man's life in a world-first operation using robotic technology.
Surgeons at St Mary's Hospital in London used the £800,000 robot to repair a complex blood vessel defect that would have proven fatal if left untreated.
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Boosting vitamin D levels 'could help prevent eyesight from deteriorating'
dailymail.co.uk - 1-17-12
Boosting vitamin D intake could help prevent deteriorating eyesight and blindness in older people, it is claimed.
Scientists said tests revealed taking vitamin D for six weeks could improve vision among middle-aged subjects.
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Alcohol risk to fetus highest late in first trimester
msnbc.msn.com - 1-17-12
Any drinking during pregnancy increases the odds of fetal alcohol syndrome, but the risk to the fetus is highest if a pregnant woman drinks during the second half of her first trimester of pregnancy, a new study finds.
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Copper socks helped Chilean miners' foot fungus
msnbc.msn.com - 1-17-12
The 33 Chilean miners who were trapped underground after their mine collapsed in August 2010 spurred an impromptu experiment, of sorts, into treatments for fungal foot infections.
Socks containing copper particles treated the fungal infections the workers suffered better than anti-fungal creams, suggests a report published today in the journal Archives of Dermatology.
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FDA fines Red Cross nearly $9.6 million for blood safety lapses
msnbc.msn.com - 1-17-12
Federal health officials have fined the American Red Cross nearly $9.6 million for sloppy and unsafe blood management practices, the second multi-million-dollar penalty levied against the agency in the last two years.
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Less Risk Of Inflammatory Bowel Disease In Warmer Climates
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-17-12
A long-term U.S. study published online in GUT has shown that living in sunnier climates may lower the chances of developing inflammatory bowel disease, especially in those aged 30 years or over.
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Untreatable Tuberculosis Reported In India
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-17-12
Experts have long feared the eventual arrival of a completely drug-resistant TB (tuberculosis) - a hospital in India has reported the nation's first cases of a type of tuberculosis for which there are no effective drugs, making the TB virtually untreatable. Other untreatable TBs have emerged over the last nine years; there have been reported cases in Iran and Italy. Most likely, there are many more cases that have never been documented, experts believe.
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What Doctors Know — and We Can Learn — About Dying
time.com - 1-17-12
Last month, an essay posted by retired physician Ken Murray called “How Doctors Die” got a huge amount of attention, some negative but mostly positive. Murray tells the story of an orthopedic surgeon who, after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, chose not to undergo treatment. The surgeon died some months later at home, never having set foot inside a hospital again.
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More, Faster Weight Loss Seen With Gastric Bypass Than Banding
healthday.com - 1-17-12
Gastric bypass surgery results in faster and longer-lasting weight loss than does gastric banding, according to a new study by Swiss investigators.
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Overweight Teen Girls May Have Higher Acne Risk
healthday.com - 1-17-12
Teenage girls who are overweight or obese are significantly more likely to develop acne than their normal-weight peers, a new Norwegian survey suggests.
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Walk cuts chocolate consumption in half
upi.com - 1-17-12
A 15-minute walk can cut snacking on chocolate at work in half, researchers in Britain found.
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Writing about values linked to weight loss
upi.com - 1-17-12
Women who spend just 15 minutes writing on an important value such as close relationships can get better at losing weight, Canadian and U.S. researchers say.
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Scientists link mass death of British bees to farm pesticides
heraldscotland.com - 1-16-12
The authoritative, peer-reviewed research undermines the pesticide industry's long-repeated arguments that bees are not being harmed, and piles pressure on UK and US authorities to follow other countries by introducing bans on the chemicals.
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Delays common in clinical trial publishing
upi.com - 1-16-12
Many National Institutes of Health-funded clinical trials go unpublished more than two years after completion, U.S. researchers say.
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Doctors try to explain increase in thyroid cancers

usatoday.com - 1-16-12
- 1-16-12
Thyroid cancer, which strikes about 11 people per 100,000 each year, seems to be on the rise. It's a trend that baffles medical researchers.
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Weight gain often unrecognized by young women
usatoday.com - 1-16-12
Many young American women fail to recognize recent weight gain, and self-perception of weight gain appears to be significantly influenced by race, ethnicity and birth control methods, according to a new study.
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Scientists find fat is the sixth human taste
telegraph.co.uk - 1-16-12
For generations, scientists thought the human tongue could detect only four basic tastes: sweet, sour, salt and bitter.
Then a fifth was discovered, "umami" or savoury. Now, researchers have identified a previously-unrecognised "sixth taste" – fat.
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Woman loses arm to flesh-eating bacteria from bath salts
msnbc.msn.com - 1-16-12
A New Orleans woman’s experiment with the illicit drugs dubbed “bath salts” cost her her arm -- and nearly her life -- after she was ravaged by flesh-eating bacteria that invaded an injection site.
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Fungi May Be Our Friends In Tackling Lead Pollution
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-16-12
Fungi may be unexpected allies in our efforts to keep hazardous lead under control. That's based on the unexpected discovery that fungi can transform lead into its most stable mineral form. The findings reported online in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, suggest that this interaction between fungi and lead may be occurring in nature anywhere the two are found together. It also suggests that the introduction or encouragement of fungi may be a useful treatment strategy for lead-polluted sites.
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Do Men Flash Cash to Find a Mate?
healthday.com - 1-16-12
When women seem scarce, men may compete for them by being impulsive, saving less and borrowing more, according to a new study.
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New Clue in Battle Against Australian Hendra Virus: African Bats Have Antibodies That Neutralize Deadly Virus
sciencedaily.com - 1-16-12
A new study on African bats provides a vital clue for unravelling the mysteries in Australia's battle with the deadly Hendra virus.
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Surprising Results from Smoke Inhalation Study
sciencedaily.com - 1-16-12
A Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine study includes some unexpected findings about the immune systems of smoke-inhalation patients.
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Stroke and Heart Attack Symptoms You Never Saw Coming
newsmax.com - 1-16-12
Strokes and heart attacks are among the deadliest conditions in the United States. And while a stroke affects your brain and a heart attack affects your heart, the main symptoms and causes for both are frighteningly similar — four things in particular that you are about to discover.
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Radioactive iodine in rainwater: Public was in the dark
montrealgazette.com - 1-16-12
After the Fukushima nuclear accident, Canadian health officials assured a nervous public that virtually no radioactive fallout had drifted to Canada.
But last March, a Health Canada monitoring station in Calgary detected an average of 8.18 becquerels per litre of radioactive iodine (an isotope released by the nuclear accident) in rainwater, the data shows.
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Scientists: UN Soldiers Brought Deadly Superbug to Americas
news.yahoo.com - 1-16-12
Compelling new scientific evidence suggests United Nations peacekeepers have carried a virulent strain of cholera -- a super bug -- into the Western Hemisphere for the first time.
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Survey: Most feel guilty after fast-food
upi.com - 1-15-12
Fifty-four percent admit feeling "a bit guilty" after eating fast-food and another 16 percent say they just feel "bad", a U.S. survey indicates.
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Third of medical costs defensive medicine
upi.com - 1-15-12
About one-third of healthcare funds in Florida goes for unnecessary tests and treatments physicians order to avoid being sued, a survey indicates.
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CDC warns against sharing insulin pens
usatoday.com - 1-15-12
Due to a growing number of reports about improper use of insulin pens, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued a reminder that the devices must never be used on more than one person.
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FDA unveils user fee program for generic drugs
usatoday.com - 1-15-12
The Food and Drug Administration would collect hundreds of millions of dollars in new fees from pharmaceutical companies to help speed up the review of generic drugs, under an agreement with industry released by the agency on Friday.
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Blood test could help to diagnose deadly mad cow disease
telegraph.co.uk - 1-15-12
Researchers have created the test for the deadly variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), which is being offered to British patients for the first time.
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Secrets of the world's healthiest women
cnn.com - 1-15-12
The secret to a long, healthy life in America? According to longevity researchers, it may be to act like you live somewhere else.
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Deaf 'Signers' Quick to Interpret Body Language: Study
healthday.com - 1-15-12
Deaf people who use sign language recognize and interpret body language quicker than hearing people who don't use sign language, researchers have found.
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Opioids Erase Memory Traces of Pain
sciencedaily.com - 1-15-12
A team of researchers at the MedUni Vienna's Department of Neurophysiology (Centre for Brain Research) has discovered a previously unknown effect of opioids: the study, which has now been published in the journal Science and was led by Ruth Drdla-Schutting and Jürgen Sandkühler, shows that opioids not only temporarily relieve pain, but at the right dose can also erase memory traces of pain in the spinal cord and therefore eliminate a key cause of chronic pain.
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Slow carbs reduce inflammation markers
upi.com - 1-15-12
A diet rich in slowly digested carbohydrates -- whole grains, legumes, high-fiber foods -- reduces inflammation in chronic disease, U.S. researchers say.
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Bacteria in GI tract of those with autism
upi.com - 1-15-12
Children with autism and gastrointestinal symptoms have high levels of the bacterium Sutterella in their gut, U.S. researchers found.
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Chlorophyll helps prevent cancer, but ...
upi.com - 1-15-12
Chlorophyll in green vegetables may protect against cancer when tested against modest carcinogen exposure, U.S. researchers say.
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New test detects staph quickly
upi.com - 1-14-12
U.S. researchers have developed a laboratory test they say can rapidly identify the bacterium responsible for staph infections.
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U.S. death every 19 minutes from overdose
upi.com - 1-14-12
Prescription drug abuse is the fastest growing drug problem in the United States and results in one death every 19 minutes, federal health officials say.
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Plutonium From Fukushima Made It Around The Planet
greenmedinfo.com - 1-14-12
A recently published study in the Journal of Environmental Radioactivity confirms that the radioactive fallout from the Fukushima nuclear disaster reached Europe (Lithuania), and included plutonium, the most deadly manmade element (nanogram for nanogram) in existence.
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Universal Flu Vaccine Could Be Available by 2013
usnews.com - 1-14-12
Annual flu shots might soon become a thing of the past, and threats such as avian and swine flu might disappear with them as a vaccine touted as the "holy grail" of flu treatment could be ready for human trials next year.
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Feds announce more charges in medical marijuana crackdown
therepublic.com - 1-14-12
The U.S. Attorney's Office says four more people face charges in their ongoing crackdown against the medical marijuana industry in Montana.
Federal agents continue to file more charges against medical marijuana providers following raids last spring that rattled the industry. The arrests, coupled with more stringent state laws, have led to dramatic changes in the medical marijuana industry.
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Married 61 Years, Husband and Wife Die Hours Apart
abcnews.go.com - 1-14-12
She was just 17. Richard Trimmer married Nancy Hoke in 1951 and for the next six decades the Trimmer family grew. The couple had six children and 10 grandchildren. They were great grandparents more than a dozen times over.
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Fruit and veg consumption 'near bottom of European league'
telegraph.co.uk - 1-14-12
Britons eat less fruit and vegetables than people in any other major European country, a study has found.
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Indexing Ovarian Cancer Symptoms - How Valuable Are They
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-14-12
A study published January 13 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute reveals that in the UK and the U.S., symptom indices used to identify individuals with symptoms connected with ovarian cancer who may need additional screening is on the rise, however, in order to help better detect cancer they may need to be reevaluated.
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Exclusive: Doctors cheated on exams
cnn.com - 1-14-12
For years, doctors around the country taking an exam to become board certified in radiology have cheated by memorizing test questions, creating sophisticated banks of what are known as "recalls," a CNN investigation has found.
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Processed meat 'linked to pancreatic cancer'
bbc.co.uk - 1-14-12
A link between eating processed meat, such as bacon or sausages, and pancreatic cancer has been suggested by researchers in Sweden.
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Grapes may help prevent blindness in aged
upi.com - 1-14-12
Eating grapes over a lifetime may slow or help prevent age-related macular degeneration, a major cause of blindness in the elderly, U.S. researchers say.
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Need to Exercise More? Think How It Will Help You Now
healthday.com - 1-14-12
Health and fitness experts have for years tried to entice people to exercise more by flogging long-range benefits such as losing weight or avoiding long-term illness caused by chronic disease.
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Blame Your Taste Buds for Liking Fat: Receptor for Tasting Fat Identified in Humans
sciencedaily.com - 1-14-12
Why do we like fatty foods so much? We can blame our taste buds. Our tongues apparently recognize and have an affinity for fat, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. They have found that variations in a gene can make people more or less sensitive to the taste of fat.
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Setting the Record Straight: Did Monsanto Really Buy Blackwater (Xe)?
naturalsociety.com - 1-14-12
There has been a great deal of publicity over the potential purchase of Blackwater (now known as Academi, and Xe before that) by mega corporation Monsanto. While the two seem to be a great match, as they both fail to consider the morality and consequence of their actions, it seems that Monsanto is only involved with Blackwater in infiltrating activist groups who are opposed to the biotech giant — an operation quite sinister enough. The truth of the matter is that Academi (Blackwater) was purchased by private investors, and the heavily sourced article written by Jeremy Scahill in The Nation actually says nothing about Monsanto buying Blackwater.
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The 10 Worst States for Retirees in 2012
finance.yahoo.com - 1-14-12
If you live in Illinois, we have some good news for you. You no longer live in the absolute worst state in which to retire. The bad news? You live in the second-worst state, according to research released Wednesday by TopRetirements.com.
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Radioactive tissue holders found in stores
upi.com - 1-14-12
New York state health officials say 12 metal tissue box holders containing low levels of cobalt-60 radioactivity were removed from four stores.
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N.Y. painkiller scripts up 6M in 3 years
upi.com - 1-13-12
The number of prescriptions for all narcotic painkillers in New York state jumped by 6 million from 2007 to 2010, the state attorney general says.
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Medical Marijuana: Federal Crackdown, Similar To That In California, Begins In Colorado
huffingtonpost.com - 1-13-12
The Associated Press reports that federal officials are beginning a California-style crackdown on medical marijuana businesses in Colorado.
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Web addicts have brain changes, research suggests
bbc.co.uk - 1-13-12
Web addicts have brain changes similar to those hooked on drugs or alcohol, preliminary research suggests.
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Antidepressants While Pregnant Linked to Slight Risk of Lung Problem in Babies
healthday.com - 1-13-12
Women who use antidepressants called selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors such as Prozac and Celexa during pregnancy run a slight risk of having an infant with high blood pressure in the lungs, a new Swedish study finds.
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Chemical found in deodorants, face cream and food products is discovered in tumours of ALL breast cancer patients
dailymail.co.uk - 1-13-12
A chemical widely used as a preservative in cosmetics, food products and pharmaceuticals has been found in tissue samples from 40 women with breast cancer.
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Study: 1 in 900 sex acts spreads HIV virus
msnbc.msn.com - 1-13-12
A heterosexual person infected with HIV will transmit the virus to their partner once in every 900 times the couple has unprotected sex, according to a new study conducted in Africa.
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Breastfed Babies Cry More, Harder To Soothe
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-13-12
New evidence from a UK study suggests that breastfed babies may be harder to soothe and cry more frequently than bottle-fed babies. But researchers say rather than being a sign of stress, irritability is a natural part of the communication between mothers and their infants and this should not put them off breastfeeding.
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Researcher Who Studied Benefits Of Red Wine Falsified Data Says University
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-13-12
An extensive misconduct investigation that took three years to complete and produced a 60,000-page report, concludes that a researcher who has come to prominence in recent years for his investigations into the beneficial properties of resveratrol, a compound found in red wine, "is guilty of 145 counts of fabrication and falsification of data".
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CPR Saves More Lives When Bystanders Are Coached
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-13-12
A new statement published by the American Heart Association (AHA) in their journal Circulation on Monday suggests that more people survive sudden cardiac arrest when 9-1-1 dispatchers coach bystanders to assess victims and then begin CPR straight away.
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Your Smartphone May Be Stressing You Out
healthday.com - 1-13-12
Compulsively checking your smartphone may not actually be that smart, British researchers warn.
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Does Deodorant Ingredient Affect Breast Cancer Risk?
healthday.com - 1-13-12
For several years, researchers have studied a possible link between substances called parabens -- widely used as a germ-fighting preservative in cosmetics such as deodorant/antiperspirants -- and breast cancer.
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Little Known About How Autism Affects Teen Drivers: Researchers
healthday.com - 1-13-12
Two-thirds of driving-age American teens with a high-functioning autism spectrum disorder are currently driving or plan to drive, and these teens have a number of common characteristics, a new study says.
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New Evidence That Bacteria in Large Intestine Have a Role in Obesity
sciencedaily.com - 1-13-12
Bacteria living in people's large intestine may slow down the activity of the "good" kind of fat tissue, a special fat that quickly burns calories and may help prevent obesity, scientists are reporting in a new study. The discovery, published in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research, could shed light on ways to prevent obesity and promote weight loss, including possible microbial and pharmaceutical approaches, the authors said.
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CDC: 38 million in U.S. binge drink
upi.com - 1-13-12
More than 38 million U.S. adults say they binge drink an average of eight drinks an average of four times a month, health officials say.
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Why alcohol feels good
upi.com - 1-13-12
Alcohol leads to the release of endorphins in certain areas of the brain that produce feelings of pleasure and reward, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Personality trait, alcohol aggression link
upi.com - 1-13-12
People who have difficulty considering consequences of their actions are more inclined than others to become aggressive when intoxicated, U.S. researchers say.
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Study: Pot less damaging than tobacco
upi.com - 1-13-12
Low-to-moderate marijuana use is less harmful than tobacco to lungs, even though the two substances contain many of the same components, U.S. researchers say.
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Study: Why coffee reduce diabetes risk
upi.com - 1-13-12
Drinking several cups of coffee daily reduces type 2 diabetes risk because it inhibits a substance linked to the disease, scientists in China suggest.
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12 Infected With New Swine Flu Strain
usnews.com - 1-13-12
The days of medical masks at airports and widespread panic may be coming back—that's because at least 12 humans are believed to have been infected with a new strain of swine flu that's not covered by this season's vaccine.
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Woman Seeking Crack Cocaine Calls Police After Drug Dealer Sells Her Sugar Instead
thesmokinggun.com - 1-13-12
Really, how many times do we have to say this?
If your drug dealer shorts you, steals your money, or provides a substance other than the illegal one sought, do not call 911.
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The Moral Case for Legalizing Marijuana
huffingtonpost.com - 1-13-12
While a recent Gallup poll revealed that a majority of Americans support legalizing marijuana, and Ron Paul -- a proponent -- has run well in the early GOP presidential primaries, most mainstream politicians still refuse to touch the subject, and many journalists continue to refer to legalization as a "radical" position.
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Get Busted for Marijuana; Work as a Police Informant; Get Killed
huffingtonpost.com - 1-12-12
No one has ever died from smoking marijuana. But getting busted with a small amount of marijuana has led to countless tragic deaths.
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More medical schools offer 'alternative' training
usatoday.com - 1-12-12
With increasing healthcare costs and concerns about medication side effects, methods of treatment such as yoga, acupuncture and tai chi – collectively known as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) — are poised to become more mainstream than ever. To prepare to treat those patients, a growing number of medical schools are offering courses on the subject, according to a recent report in the Huffington Post.
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Alcohol Releases the Brain's 'Feel-Good' Chemicals
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 1-12-12
Drinking alcohol triggers the release of endorphins — chemicals that produce feelings of pleasure — in certain areas of the brain, which may help explain why some people drink more than others, according to a small new study.
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'Cuddle hormone' which makes mothers kinder could help treat autism
dailymail.co.uk - 1-12-12
A natural chemical known as the 'cuddle hormone' makes people kinder and could help millions suffering from psychiatric disorders such as autism, say scientists.
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Brain's Ability To Self-Repair Boosted By Natural Protein
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-12-12
Researchers from the Medical Research Council (MRC) in the UK have found a protein made by blood vessels in the brain that could be a good candidate for regenerative therapies that stimulate the brain to repair itself after injury or disease. They write about their findings in the 9 January online issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Type 1 Diabetes Reversed With Stem Cells From Cord Blood
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-12-12
Stem cells from cord blood "re-educated" the immune system T cells of people with type 1 diabetes so their pancreas started producing insulin again, thereby reducing the amount of insulin they needed to inject. These are the findings of a study led by Dr Yong Zhao, from University of Illinois at Chicago that were published online on Tuesday in the open access journal BMC Medicine.
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Orange Juice - FDA Concern Regarding Banned Fungicide
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-12-12
The FDA (Food and Drug Administration) released a letter to orange juice processing companies regarding their take on the recent discovery of carbendazim in orange juice. Carbendazim, molecular formula C9H9N3O2, is a fungicide (chemical that destroy fungi that are harmful to crops).
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System cited in cantaloupe illness outbreak
upi.com - 1-12-12
A federal probe says a deadly Colorado listeria outbreak in cantaloupe was the fault of a grower and an audit system containing inherent conflicts of interest.
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Delusion linked to schizophrenia
upi.com - 1-12-12
People with schizophrenia showed greater brain activity during tests that induce a brief, mild form of delusional thinking, researchers in Canada say.
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Study: 42% of India's children underweight
upi.com - 1-12-12
A study of malnutrition among Indian children found about four in 10 of those younger than 5 are underweight, a significant improvement over seven years ago.
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Could Internet Addiction Disrupt Brain's Connections?
healthday.com - 1-12-12
A small Chinese study suggests that the brains of teenagers who are seemingly addicted to the Internet have abnormal "white matter," the biological insulation that surrounds the wiring between neurons.
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Touching a Nerve: How Every Hair in Skin Feels Touch and How It All Gets to the Brain
sciencedaily.com - 1-12-12
Neuroscientists at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have discovered how the sense of touch is wired in the skin and nervous system. The new findings, published Dec. 22 in Cell, open new doors for understanding how the brain collects and processes information from hairy skin.
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Cholesterol drug may up diabetes risk
upi.com - 1-12-12
People who take statins -- drugs to lower their heart risk by lowering cholesterol levels -- may have a slightly higher risk of diabetes, U.S. researchers say.
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Monsanto Now Owns Blackwater (Xe)
darkgovernment.com - 1-12-12
A report by Jeremy Scahill in The Nation (Blackwater’s Black Ops, 9/15/2010) revealed that the largest mercenary army in the world, Blackwater (now called Xe Services) clandestine intelligence services was sold to the multinational Monsanto.
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Canadians favor banning kid junk food ads
upi.com - 1-11-12
Most Canadians say they strongly support banning marketing of high-fat, high-sugar or high-salt foods aimed at kids and youth, a survey indicates.
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Artificial trans fat still in many food
upi.com - 1-11-12
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration required trans fat to be listed on food labels, but many foods still contain trans fats, a food advocacy group says.
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Mitt Romney Ducks Medical Marijuana Questions
huffingtonpost.com - 1-11-12
GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney repeatedly dodged questions about medical marijuana, refusing to engage activists who took to the campaign trail in New Hampshire to press him on the issue.
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UA study: Divorce can raise risk of early death
usatoday.com - 1-11-12
Getting a divorce? Be careful. Your health could plummet as if you had taken up smoking, become overweight or started drinking excessively.
A new review by the University of Arizona of more than 30 published studies found divorced adults have a significantly higher risk of early death compared with married adults.
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Entire Human Genome Sequenced For $1,000
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-11-12
Life Technologies has launched the new Benchtop Ion Proton Sequencer, which can determine the entire human genome for $1,000, in as little as one day. Previously, it had taken the machine anywhere from weeks, and even months to sequence a human genome, and would cost between $5,000 and $10,000.
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Vitamin B and folic acid 'boosts memory in pensioners'
dailymail.co.uk - 1-11-12
Older adults who want a sharper recall should take note - a study has found taking vitamin B12 and folic acid for two years improves both short and long-term memory.
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All that stress is shrinking your brain, new study finds
msnbc.msn.com - 1-11-12
Everyone knows stress can cause headaches and sleepless nights. But a new study suggests it can actually shrink your brain.
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Diabetes affects drop out rate, lifetime earnings
cnn.com - 1-11-12
Diabetes is contributing to high school dropout rates and reducing lifetime earnings for young people, according to a new study published Monday in the journal Health Affairs.
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Routine aspirin 'may cause harm'
bbc.co.uk - 1-11-12
Healthy people who take aspirin to prevent a heart attack or stroke could be doing more harm than good, warn researchers.
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Parents share cancer gene test results
upi.com - 1-11-12
Parents who get tested for breast cancer genes often share their results with their children, even with those who are very young, U.S. researchers say.
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Occasional Pot Smoking Won't Harm Lungs: Study
healthday.com - 1-11-12
Unlike the cigarette habit, occasional pot smoking does not seem to trigger declines in lung function that could lead to breathing problems, a new 20-year study suggests.
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Autism Gastro Problems May Be Linked to Gut Bacteria
healthday.com - 1-11-12
Children with autism have bacteria in their gut that is different from the bacteria seen in kids who do not have the disorder, researchers have found.
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Cosmetic Chemical Hinders Brain Development in Tadpoles
sciencedaily.com - 1-11-12
A new study finds that low concentrations of the chemical methylisothiazolinone has subtle but measurable negative effects on the neural development of tadpoles. The chemical is found in some cosmetics, although the study does not provide any evidence that cosmetics are unsafe for humans.
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An Apple a Day Isn't Enough: Many People Not Eating Enough Fruits and Vegetables
sciencedaily.com - 1-11-12
Adults from 30 to 60 years old, especially those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds, aren't consuming the daily recommended levels of fruits and vegetables. Quebecers, however, eat more of nature's produce than their fellow Canadians.
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Fukushima Fallout in the American Heartland
enviroreporter.com - 1-11-12
Home for the holidays takes on a whole new glow when flying for the first time through Fukushima fallout to our family in Michigan.
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Restricted embryo growth 'predicts miscarriage risk'
bbc.co.uk - 1-10-12
The growth of an embryo during the early stages of pregnancy is linked to its risk of miscarriage, says a University of Nottingham study.
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Law requires U.S. Alzheimer's strategy
upi.com - 1-10-12
The draft National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease offers a comprehensive outline for the U.S. strategic plan for Alzheimer's, Alzheimer's experts say.
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Legionnaires' spread linked to fountain
upi.com - 1-10-12
A "water wall" decorative fountain located in a Wisconsin hospital's main lobby caused an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease, researchers say.
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Study: Healthy eating may help children with ADHD
usatoday.com - 1-10-12
There's limited evidence that any particular diet or supplement helps kids with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but at least some research suggests that omega-3 fatty acids may help while fatty "Western-style" diets do these children no favors.
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New binge-drinking daily limit advice as drinkers are told to have at least two alcohol-free days a week
dailymail.co.uk - 1-10-12
Drinkers should have at least two alcohol-free days a week and take their weight into account when counting the units they consume, a committee of MPs recommends today.
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Americans hit the brakes on health care spending
msnbc.msn.com - 1-10-12
U.S. healthcare spending barely rose in 2010 from record-low recession levels, as high unemployment and the loss of private health insurance forced many Americans to delay or forego medical treatment, government officials said on Monday.
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"Couch Potato Drug" May Protect Against Heat Stroke
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-10-12
An experimental drug that once made the headlines as the "couch potato pill", for its capacity to mimic the effects of exercise in sedentary mice, may have another use, as a way to protect against heat stroke. In a new study about to be published in the journal Nature Medicine, scientists describe how the experimental therapy, called AICAR, protected animals with a genetic predisposition to heat stroke. They hope it means the drug holds promise for treating people who are susceptible to heat-induced sudden death.
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Incontinence Is A Condition, And Should Not Be A Taboo Subject
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-10-12
200 million people worldwide are affected by urinary incontinence. Emeritus consultant urologist to the North Bristol NHS Trust, Professor Roger Feneley, a leading urologist, urged people to stop treating urinary incontinence as a 'taboo' subject and to speak more openly about it after the launch of the world's first intelligent catheter leg bag with an electrical pump.
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Excederin, Bufferin, Gas-X, NoDoz recalled
upi.com - 1-10-12
Novartis Consumer Health is recalling Excedrin, Bufferin, Gas-X Prevention and NoDoz in the United States after reports of chipped and broken pills.
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New Blood Thinner Linked To Higher Heart Attack Risk
healthday.com - 1-10-12
The anticoagulant Pradaxa (dabigatran) is associated with a small increase in the risk of heart attack, a new review finds.
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Low-Dose Aspirin to Prevent First Heart Attack or Stroke? Not So Fast
healthday.com - 1-10-12
For years, people have been told that low-dose aspirin can help reduce their risk of dying from a heart attack, stroke or cancer even if they are healthy. Now, a new evidence review calls this advice into question.
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Grief Is a Real Heartbreaker, Study Finds
healthday.com - 1-10-12
There really is such a thing as heartbreaking grief, suggests new research that finds losing a loved one can increase the risk of heart attack.
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Nicotine Patches, Gums Won't Help Smokers Quit Long-Term: Study
healthday.com - 1-10-12
Nicotine patches and nicotine gum -- the popular mainstays of so-called "nicotine replacement therapy" -- don't help many smokers kick the habit and remain cigarette-free over the long haul, new research suggests.
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Proton Therapy Effective Prostate Cancer Treatment, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 1-10-12
Proton therapy, a type of external beam radiation therapy, is a safe and effective treatment for prostate cancer, according to two new studies published in the January issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology•Biology•Physics (Red Journal), the American Society for Radiation Oncology's (ASTRO) official scientific journal.
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Research Demonstrating Link Between Virus and MS Could Point the Way to Treatment and Prevention
sciencedaily.com - 1-10-12
A new study from researchers at Queen Mary, University of London shows how a particular virus tricks the immune system into triggering inflammation and nerve cell damage in the brain, which is known to cause MS.
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Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Depression, Psychiatrists Report
sciencedaily.com - 1-10-12
Low levels of vitamin D have been linked to depression, according to UT Southwestern Medical Center psychiatrists working with the Cooper Center Longitudinal Study. It is believed to be the largest such investigation ever undertaken.
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Is your pet psychic? A Cambridge scientist believes we have only seen the beginning of animals' telepathic powers
dailymail.co.uk - 1-10-12
One of my former neighbours in my home town of Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire, was a widow whose son was a sailor in the merchant navy.
He did not like to tell his mother when he would be coming home on leave because he was afraid she would worry if he was delayed on the way. But his mother always knew anyway — thanks to the family cat.
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Genital Herpes Treatment - Virus Can Reactivate After Aggressive Antiviral Therapy
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-9-12
According to a study in which three trials of antiviral therapy to treat genital herpes were combined, the herpes simplex virus type 2/HSV-2 can reactivate in 'breakthrough episodes' even when doses of antiviral therapy are high. The study is published Online First in The Lancet and suggests that new therapies should be conducted to successfully prevent further transmission of this common infection, which affects one in five people.
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How to get your metabolism moving
cnn.com - 1-9-12
Here's something to feel good about: Your body is a calorie-burning machine. You'll even torch a few while reading this article.
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PET therapy effective for prostate cancer
upi.com - 1-9-12
U.S. researchers suggest proton therapy -- a type of external beam radiation -- is effective for localized prostate cancer with minimal side effects.
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Age-related effect of MS may be reversible
upi.com - 1-9-12
U.S. and British researchers report their work with mice indicates the myelin sheath surrounding nerves lost to multiple sclerosis may be partially rejuvenated.
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Spray to help alleviate marijuana withdrawal
abc.net.au - 1-9-12
Smokers have nicotine replacement options to deal with withdrawal symptoms while they're trying to kick the habit.
For those dependent on marijuana, there's no equivalent.
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Drinkers should have two 'dry' days a week, say MPs
telegraph.co.uk - 1-9-12
The Science and Technology Committee says current advice on “regular” safe intake is confusing, and wrongly leads people to believe that enjoying a few pints of beer or glasses of wine every day will not harm health.
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Incredible 200lb Tumor Removed From Man's Leg
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-9-12
In something that looks and sounds more like an episode of a science fiction show, than medical science, a thirty two year old man from Vietnam survived a 12 hour operation to remove an enormous tumor from his leg. McKay McKinnon a U.S. surgeon, headed up the team of eight who spent an entire day operating on Nguyen Duy Hai earlier this week.
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Why Some People Live to 110
healthday.com - 1-9-12
People who live 110 years or longer have as many disease-associated genes as those in the general population, but they may also be blessed with protective genes that help them live so long, researchers report.
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How Poor Maternal Diet Can Increase Risk of Diabetes: New Mechanism Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 1-9-12
Researchers funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council have shown one way in which poor nutrition in the womb can put a person at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes and other age-related diseases in later life. This finding could lead to new ways of identifying people who are at a higher risk of developing these diseases and might open up targets for treatment.
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Gunshot, Stabbing Victims Are Recovering Without Exploratory Surgery
sciencedaily.com - 1-9-12
Although more patients with abdominal gunshot and stab wounds can successfully forego emergency "exploratory" surgery and its potential complications, new Johns Hopkins research suggests that choosing the wrong patients for this "watchful waiting" approach substantially increases their risk of death from these injuries.
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Most men unhappy with level of muscularity
upi.com - 1-9-12
Most men in Britain say they are unhappy about how muscular their arms and chests are, but a beer belly is their biggest body issue, researchers say.
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As Nations Develop, So May Bowel Disease
healthday.com - 1-8-12
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is becoming more common around the world, according to a new study.
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Researchers: Name can affect life chances
upi.com - 1-8-12
A name that others associate with bad qualities can have effects throughout adult life, German researchers say.
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Marijuana Use Most Rampant in Australia, Study Finds
nytimes.com - 1-8-12
A study published Friday in a British medical journal may have finally uncovered the secret behind Australia’s laid-back lifestyle, and it turns out to be more than just sun and surf: The denizens Down Under, it turns out, consume more marijuana than any other people on the planet.
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You Say You Don't Care About Dating A Hottie?
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-8-12
Stating that you don't care if you land a partner who is "hot" or "sexy" is relatively commonplace. But what people say they want and what they actually want are often two very different things when it comes to romantic attraction.
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Study Finds Statin Costs 400 Percent Higher In US Compared To UK
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-8-12
In the United States, the cost paid for statins (drugs to lower cholesterol) in people under the age of 65 who have private insurance is approximately 400 percent higher than comparable costs paid by the government in the United Kingdom (U.K.). These findings, from the Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program, are the first results of a comprehensive comparison of prescription drug costs between the U.S. and U.K. The study appears on-line in the journal Pharmacotherapy.
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Whiff Of 'Love Hormone' Helps Monkeys Show A Little Kindness
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-8-12
Oxytocin, the "love hormone" that builds mother-baby bonds and may help us feel more connected toward one another, can also make surly monkeys treat each other a little more kindly.
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Chinese Herbal Medicine May Provide Novel Treatment For Alcohol Abuse
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-8-12
UCLA researchers have identified how a component of an ancient Chinese herbal anti-hangover medicine called dihydromyricetin, isolated from the plant Hovenia, counteracts acute alcohol intoxication and withdrawal symptoms. UCLA researchers have identified how a component of an ancient Chinese herbal anti-hangover medicine called dihydromyricetin, isolated from the plant Hovenia, counteracts acute alcohol intoxication and withdrawal symptoms.
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Study: Binge drinkers tend to partner
upi.com - 1-8-12
Many binge drinkers are in romantic relationships with people who exhibit similar behavior, Canadian researchers say.
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Underactive thyroid common in moms-to-be
upi.com - 1-8-12
About 15 percent of pregnant U.S. women tested positive for gestational hypothyroidism -- underactive thyroid -- higher than prior estimates, researchers say.
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EPA: Toxic chemical releases rise 16% in 2010
usatoday.com - 1-7-12
Reversing a downward trend, the amount of toxic chemicals released into the nation's environment in 2010 was 16% higher than the year before, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reports.
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Radioactive cream used to treat skin cancer
telegraph.co.uk - 1-7-12
A new skin cancer treatment which uses radiation to kill benign tumours with a single application of cream could be used as an alternative to surgery, researchers claim.
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Penis tattoo gives guy permanent erection
msnbc.msn.com - 1-7-12
You’d think somebody repeatedly sticking a needle in your penis would be a little off-putting, but the 21-year-old Iranian apparently thought it would be a grand idea to have Persian script reading borow be salaamat (good luck on your journeys), and the first initial of his girlfriend’s last name (“M”) tattooed onto his little gentleman.
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What makes something 'cute,' anyway?
msnbc.msn.com - 1-7-12
Adorable baby animals are gaining millions of clicks online because, according to top researchers, they appeal to the 'pleasure center' in our brains. NBC's Michelle Kosinski reports.
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Only 1 in 7 hospital errors reported, study finds
msnbc.msn.com - 1-7-12
Hospital employees recognize and report only one out of seven errors, accidents and other events that harm Medicare patients while they are hospitalized, federal investigators say in a new report.
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200 Million Illicit Drug Users Worldwide
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-7-12
Illicit drug usage is practiced by approximately 200 million people globally, Australian researchers reported in the medical journal The Lancet. High-income nations have the highest rates, and disease burdens related to drugs are comparable to the health toll caused by alcohol consumption.
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Visualizing wellness for 2012
cnn.com - 1-7-12
The last time you went to the doctor's office, you probably got some numbers representing your pulse, blood pressure, maybe even cholesterol and weight. But what does that really mean for you?
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Study: Annual prostate cancer test doesn't save lives
cnn.com - 1-7-12
Researchers have found more evidence that annual prostate cancer screening, called PSA test, in men doesn't save lives. Scientists followed 76,000 men for 10 to 13 years and found annual screening for prostate cancer led to more diagnoses but didn't result in less deaths from the disease, according to a new study from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
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Study: High-fat foods cause brain scarring
cnn.com - 1-7-12
A study published recently in The Journal of Clinical Investigation shows that high-fat foods cause damage to the hypothalamus - an area in the brain responsible for hunger, thirst and the body's natural rhythms and cycles - in rodents.
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'US body scanners can cause death'
presstv.ir - 1-7-12
Despite frequent claims by the US Transportation Security Administration (TSA) that their naked body scanners are harmless, a radiation doctor says the surveillance devices can cause death or cancer.
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As Nations Develop, So May Bowel Disease
sciencedaily.com - 1-7-12
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is becoming more common around the world, according to a new study.
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Paranoid or Placid? Scans Show Pot's Effect on Brain
sciencedaily.com - 1-7-12
Smoking marijuana can mean different things to different people -- for some, anxiety and paranoia can set in, while others mellow out.
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Researchers Identify Liver Cancer Risk Factors
sciencedaily.com - 1-7-12
Two new studies from the Mayo Clinic find that hepatitis C infection and obesity could be to blame for a surge in liver cancer cases, which have tripled over the last 30 years.
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What Determines the Capacity of Short-Term Memory?
sciencedaily.com - 1-7-12
Short-term memory plays a crucial role in how our consciousness operates. Several years ago a hypothesis has been formulated, according to which capacity of short-term memory depends in a special way on two cycles of brain electric activity. Scientists from the Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw have now demonstrated this experimentally for the first time.
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Religious Beliefs Battle Hypertension, Norwegian Study of Church Attendance Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 1-7-12
Does a belief in God confer any health benefits? With the help of a large Norwegian longitudinal health study called HUNT, researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) were able to find a clear relationship between time spent in church and lower blood pressure in both women and men.
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Sea Snails Help Scientists Explore a Possible Way to Enhance Memory
sciencedaily.com - 1-7-12
Efforts to help people with learning impairments are being aided by a species of sea snail known as Aplysia californica. The mollusk, which is used by researchers to study the brain, has much in common with other species including humans. Research involving the snail has contributed to the understanding of learning and memory.
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Red wine may reduce breast cancer risk
upi.com - 1-7-12
Red wine may reduce one risk factor for breast cancer, challenging the widely-held belief that alcohol increases breast cancer, U.S. researchers say.
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Air pollution linked to diabetes
upi.com - 1-7-12
A U.S. study finds air pollution is linked to increased incidence of diabetes and hypertension in African-American women, researchers say.
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Vitamin D lack linked to depression
upi.com - 1-7-12
Higher vitamin D levels are linked with a significantly decreased risk of depression, especially among those with a history of depression, U.S. researchers say.
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Surgery affects memory, concentration
upi.com - 1-6-12
Patients undergoing surgery and anesthesia can develop a decline in memory and learning long after the procedure, researchers in Sweden say.
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Marijuana May Both Trigger and Suppress Psychosis
time.com - 1-6-12
It’s a familiar experience for most marijuana smokers — that sudden discovery of great meaning, humor or intensity in what they would ordinarily find to be mundane situations and sensations. It’s part of why people seek out marijuana, but this undue attention to what ordinarily seems insignificant is also part of the psychotic experience of schizophrenia— and new research finds that the two main ingredients in marijuana have opposing effects on it.
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Stephen Hawking to turn 70, defying disease
usatoday.com - 1-6-12
British scientist Stephen Hawking has decoded some of the most puzzling mysteries of the universe but he has left one mystery unsolved: How he has managed to survive so long with such a crippling disease.
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On the other hand: understanding left-handedness
usatoday.com - 1-6-12
What do Barack Obama, Jay Leno, Michelangelo, Oprah Winfrey, Larry Bird and Jimi Hendrix have in common? They're all left-handed. Anywhere from 5% to 26% of the population are left-handed, but no one knows exactly why being left-handed is less common. A new review by Germany researchers looks at the current science behind left-handedness.
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Cannabis use in middle age 'doesn't lead to mental decline'
dailymail.co.uk - 1-6-12
Middle-aged adults whose memories have grown hazy can't blame smoking cannabis for their forgetfulness, according to researchers.
Scientists from King's College, London, found occasional pot use could actually improve concentration levels although they stressed that long-term use could be harmful.
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Cream that can clear skin cancer without surgery could save 3,000 lives a year
dailymail.co.uk - 1-6-12
A radioactive ‘paint’ could cure up to 3,000 people with skin cancer every year.
In just two hours, the new technique can obliterate tumours caused by the most common skin cancers without surgery or conventional radiotherapy.
Scientists say there are minimal side effects and the treatment does not even leave a scar.
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Forget Kiss Of Life And Concentrate On "Hard And Fast" CPR, Charity Urges Bystanders
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-6-12
UK charity British Heart Foundation (BHF) is kicking off the New Year with a vigorous campaign to actively promote Hands-only Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). Their message, which is backed by Resuscitation Council UK, to anyone who does not have CPR training, is forget about kiss of life and focus on giving "hard and fast" compressions in the centre of the chest. The aim is to give bystanders confidence to act when they encounter a person in cardiac arrest.
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Why is the female orgasm so elusive?
cnn.com - 1-6-12
Nearly every week I receive an email from at least one woman asking me what she needs to do to have an orgasm during intercourse, or worrying that something may be wrong with her because she can’t. Yet I rarely, if ever, receive the same question from men.
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Hepatitis C vaccine: Oxford researchers' trial 'promising'
bbc.co.uk - 1-6-12
An early clinical trial of a hepatitis C vaccine has shown "promising" results, according to researchers at Oxford University.
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Assisted suicide: 'Strong case for legalisation'
bbc.co.uk - 1-6-12
There is a "strong case" for allowing assisted suicide for people who are terminally ill in England and Wales, a group of experts says.
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Plan a health improvement with a buddy
upi.com - 1-6-12
People who plan to do something in advance are more inclined to follow through, and British researchers say planning with another person is better still.
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Surgery affects memory, concentration
upi.com - 1-6-12
Patients undergoing surgery and anesthesia can develop a decline in memory and learning long after the procedure, researchers in Sweden say.
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U.S. cancer rates declining
upi.com - 1-6-12
U.S. cancer death rates decreased by 1.8 percent per year in men and by 1.6 percent per year in women from 2004 and 2008, the American Cancer Society says.
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Mental Decline Can Start at 45, Study Finds
healthday.com - 1-6-12
Sorry, Boomers, but a new study suggests that memory, reasoning and comprehension can start to slip as early as age 45.
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Experts Endorse Lower Lead-Poisoning Threshold
healthday.com - 1-6-12
Pediatric health experts are applauding a U.S. advisory panel's recommendation to lower the threshold for toxic lead exposure in children.
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Could Daily Aspirin Harm Seniors' Eyes?
healthday.com - 1-6-12
Daily aspirin use among seniors may double their risk of developing a particularly advanced form of age-related macular degeneration, a debilitating eye disease, a large new European study suggests.
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Like Babies, Dogs Pick Up on People's Intent
healthday.com - 1-6-12
Man's beloved four-legged friends not only respond to the words and ministrations of humans, dogs can understand and anticipate the intentions of their people, researchers are reporting.
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Disease-Causing Strains of Fusarium Prevalent in Sink Drains
sciencedaily.com - 1-6-12
A study examining the prevalence of the fungus Fusarium in bathroom sink drains suggests that plumbing systems may be a common source of human infections.
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Outside Temperatures, Sun Exposure and Gender May Trigger Glaucoma
sciencedaily.com - 1-6-12
When it comes to whether or not you will develop exfoliation syndrome (ES) -- an eye condition that is a leading cause of secondary open-angle glaucoma and increased risk of cataract as well as cataract surgery complications -- age, gender and where you live does matter.
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Dried Licorice Root Fights the Bacteria That Cause Tooth Decay and Gum Disease, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 1-6-12
Scientists are reporting identification of two substances in licorice -- used extensively in Chinese traditional medicine -- that kill the major bacteria responsible for tooth decay and gum disease, the leading causes of tooth loss in children and adults. In a study in ACS' Journal of Natural Products, they say that these substances could have a role in treating and preventing tooth decay and gum disease.
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Study: One in 30 U.S. babies is a twin
upi.com - 1-5-12
One in every 30 babies born in the United States in 209 was a twin, compared with one in every 53 in 1980, federal health officials say.
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Body not fooled by protein intake
upi.com - 1-5-12
Calories alone and not protein appear to contribute to an increase in body fat, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Children in child care get little exercise
upi.com - 1-5-12
Three-fourths of U.S. preschool-age children are in child care centers with little opportunity for recommended levels of physical activity, researchers say.
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Twin births rising, especially for older women, CDC says
usatoday.com - 1-5-12
More parents are seeing double these days — and federal data released today explains why: The number of twin births in the USA more than doubled from 1980 to 2009.
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Infants' Sleep Woes May Persist into Toddlerhood
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 1-5-12
Infants who have trouble falling and staying asleep might be at risk for persistent sleep problems throughout their early childhood, a new study suggests.
Researchers asked 359 mothers to fill out a questionnaire to learn whether their infants and toddlers had trouble sleeping.
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Women want less sex as they get older but it's quality that matters - even in their 80s
dailymail.co.uk - 1-5-12
Women want less sex as they get older - but the sex they do have is a lot more satisfying, according to new research.
As they head beyond middle age it seems the quality rather than the quantity is what matters, say scientists from the University of California, San Diego.
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Ozone injection 'can ease agony of back pain'
dailymail.co.uk - 1-5-12
A single injection of a gas linked with air pollution could ease back pain for millions of people, new research shows.
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Death rate in Welsh villages similar to African countries
telegraph.co.uk - 1-5-12
The death rate in the poorest parts of Britain is as high as that in some African countries, figures suggest.
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Physically Active Kids Appear To Do Better In Class
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-5-12
A systematic review of published data reported in the January issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine finds there may be a positive link between physical activity and academic performance of children in school: the ones who are more physically active seem to do better in class. However, the authors are cautious about the certainty of this finding because too few of the studies they reviewed were of sufficiently high quality. They call for further research using more robust measures of physical activity.
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Overall Fatness, Not Just BMI, Weight, for Measuring Obesity?
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-5-12
A new JAMA study published online on Wednesday suggests that when people consistently eat more calories than their bodies can burn each day, it appears they gain body fat and lose lean muscle if their diet is low in protein. Experts commenting in the same issue of the journal say this means in tackling obesity we need to focus on people's overall fatness and not just body mass index or body weight.
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Gestational Diabetes Linked To ADHD Risk In Offspring
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-5-12
According to a report Online First by Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, babies who are born to mothers with diabetes during their pregnancy and/or living in low income households, have a higher risk of subsequently developing ADHD during childhood.
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U.S. News ranks best diets for 2012
cnn.com - 1-5-12
The beginning of the year is when many people vow to lose weight, and it's also when U.S. News & World Report releases their annual Best Diet rankings, which is based on information from scientific journals, government reports and various health and nutrition experts nationwide.
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Playtime for preschoolers essential, study says
cnn.com - 1-5-12
Preschoolers in child care centers aren't spending enough time playing outdoors and just being kids, according to a new study published in this week's Pediatrics journal.
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Potential Herpes Vaccine Disappoints Researchers
healthday.com - 1-5-12
A potential vaccine for genital herpes has shown only limited effectiveness in thwarting one type of the sexually transmitted virus and no ability to stop a second type from spreading, a new study shows.
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FDA Curbs Use of Certain Antibiotics in Livestock, Poultry
healthday.com - 1-5-12
Worried about the growing threat of antibiotic-resistant microbes in humans, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday curbed the use of certain antibiotics in cattle, pigs and poultry.
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Study Reveals Who's More Prone to Be a 'Mean Drunk'
healthday.com - 1-5-12
People who lack the ability to consider the future consequences of their current actions are more likely to be aggressive when they're drunk, a new study indicates.
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Many NIH-Funded Clinical Trials Go Unpublished Over Two Years After Completion, U.S. Study Shows
sciencedaily.com - 1-5-12
In a study that investigates the challenges of disseminating clinical research findings in peer-reviewed biomedical journals, Yale School of Medicine researchers have found that fewer than half of a sample of trials primarily or partially funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) were published within 30 months of completing the clinical trial.
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Antiestrogen Therapy May Decrease Risk for Melanoma
sciencedaily.com - 1-5-12
Women with breast cancer who take antiestrogen supplements may be decreasing their risk for melanoma, according to a study published in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
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Researchers create healthier cigarette
upi.com - 1-5-12
U.S. researchers found lycopene and grape seed extract drastically reduced the amount of cancer-causing free radicals produced in cigarettes.
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Hormone linked to dementia in women
upi.com - 1-5-12
An elevated level of the hormone adiponectin is an independent predictor for all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease in women, U.S. researchers say.
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Pot ingredients affect brain differently
upi.com - 1-5-12
British researchers studied two ingredients of marijuana and found they seem to affect different parts of the brain.
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ADHD: Gestational diabetes, poverty link
upi.com - 1-4-12
Poor children whose mothers experienced diabetes while pregnant are at higher risk of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, U.S. researchers say.
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Calories Raise Body Fat When People Overeat, Not Protein
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-4-12
In a study published in the January 4 issue of JAMA, researchers assessed 25 healthy individuals who were randomized to different levels of overconsumption on protein diets whilst living in a controlled setting. They found that those who consumed the low-protein diet gained less weight compared with those eating normal and high protein diets. Furthermore, they established that calories alone and not protein seemed to contribute to increases in body fat and that protein did contribute to changes in energy expenditure and lean body mass.
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Adderall Shortage Set To Continue
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-4-12
Adderall is a stimulant used to treat ADHD, but it's also a controlled substance due to the addictive qualities of the drug. The DEA (Drug Enforcement Agency) monitors and controls how much of the base ingredients to manufacture the drug can be distributed to pharmaceutical companies.
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It's there for a reason! How flushing the toilet with lid up 'could spread winter vomiting bug'
dailymail.co.uk - 1-4-12
It may seem like a subject ripe for toilet humour - but whether you close the lavatory lid before you flush could have an impact on the spread of disease, according to an expert.
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Fish oil may hold key to leukaemia cure
dailymail.co.uk - 1-4-12
A compound produced from fish oil that appears to target leukemia stem cells could lead to a cure for the disease, according to Penn State researchers.
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Fillers could prove next cosmetic surgery scandal, experts warn
telegraph.co.uk - 1-4-12
Patients who use anti-ageing injections could be putting themselves at risk in a market that is largely unregulated in Britain, experts have warned.
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Parkinson's Disease And Survival - Factors That Have An Impact
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-4-12
A report in the January issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals, reveals that demographics and clinical factors seem to be linked to survival in patients with Parkinson disease (PD), and that the presence of dementia is linked to a substantial increase in mortality.
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Psychiatric Drugs Overused In Nursing Homes - Authorities Concerned
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-4-12
According to government inspectors from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), strong psychiatric medications are often prescribed to individuals with dementia in nursing homes, but for off-label reasons. In addition, families of dementia patients in nursing homes should be vigilant about the care they receive. Drugs, such as Zyprexa and Seroquel, designed to treat individuals with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, are being used to sedate residents with dementia.
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Too little protein may equal too much body fat
cnn.com - 1-4-12
People who consistently consume more calories than they burn each day will lose lean muscle and accumulate body fat more easily if their diets contain too little protein and too much fat and carbohydrates, suggests a study published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
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A Shot of Young Stem Cells Made Rapidly Aging Mice Live Much Longer and Healthier
sciencedaily.com - 1-4-12
Mice bred to age too quickly seemed to have sipped from the fountain of youth after scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine injected them with stem cell-like progenitor cells derived from the muscle of young, healthy animals. Instead of becoming infirm and dying early as untreated mice did, animals that got the stem/progenitor cells improved their health and lived two to three times longer than expected, according to findings published in the Jan. 3 edition of Nature Communications.
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U.S. Heart Attack Patients Readmitted Most Often: Study
healthday.com - 1-4-12
People who have heart attacks in the United States are far more likely to be readmitted to the hospital within 30 days than people in 16 other countries, a new study indicates.
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Extra Calories, Low Protein Are Culprits in Weight Gain
healthday.com - 1-4-12
It's too many calories, not too much protein, that leads to unhealthy weight gain associated with overeating, new research suggests.
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Poor sleep linked to worse blood sugar
upi.com - 1-4-12
Young people with type 1 diabetes may have hard time getting a good night's sleep, resulting in worse control of blood sugar, U.S. researchers say.
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Watching sitcoms may improve health
upi.com - 1-4-12
Watching TV sitcoms may help health because there is a direct correlation between laughter and positive effects on the body and mind, a U.S. researcher says.
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A.J. Jacobs: How healthy living nearly killed me - Video (8:43)
ted.com - 1-4-12
For a full year, A.J. Jacobs followed every piece of health advice he could -- from applying sunscreen by the shot glass to wearing a bicycle helmet while shopping. Onstage at TEDMED, he shares the surprising things he learned.
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Poor sleep linked to worse blood sugar
upi.com - 1-3-12
Young people with type 1 diabetes may have hard time getting a good night's sleep, resulting in worse control of blood sugar, U.S. researchers say.
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Eating fresh produce in winter is easy
upi.com - 1-3-12
Part of the "eating local" movement is to eat produce in season, and in winter some fresh fruit and vegetables are nutritional stars, a U.S. food expert says.
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Children becoming 'addicted' to computers
telegraph.co.uk - 1-3-12
Children’s access to smartphones and computers should be limited to stop them becoming “addicted” to electronic gadgets, according to a schools' leader.
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'Mind control' scientists can make mice forget bad memories - and the technique could work in humans
dailymail.co.uk - 1-3-12
Neuroscientists at MIT have found a chemical way to make mice forget bad memories.
By deactivating a 'memory gene' - Npas 4 - they found that mice would 'forget' their fear of a chamber where they had previously been given electric shocks.
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The Truth About Nitrite in Lunch Meat
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 1-3-12
The preservative sodium nitrite fights harmful bacteria in ham, salami and other processed and cured meats and also lends them their pink coloration. However, under certain conditions in the human body, nitrite can damage cells and also morph into molecules that cause cancer.
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How Marijuana May Drive the Brain into Psychosis
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 1-3-12
Two ingredients in marijuana have opposite effects on certain regions of the brain, according to a new study.
One chemical, called tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), increases the brain processes that can lead to symptoms of psychosis, while another compound, called cannabidiol, may negate such symptoms, according to the study.
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Advice for keeping your New Year's resolutions
usatoday.com - 1-3-12
Every January, with the dawning of another year, the annual New Year's resolution becomes one of those good ideas that never seems to work out as intended. Many still approach the year's start with a laundry list of do's and don'ts they hope can make a change in their lives
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Scientists grow sperm in laboratory dish
telegraph.co.uk - 1-3-12
The development opens up the possibility of infertile men being able to father their own children rather than using donor sperm.
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What weight problem? Vast majority of the obese deny being unhealthy
telegraph.co.uk - 1-3-12
Only six per cent of overweight people believe they should be described as obese, a survey found.
Three quarters of those with an obese body mass index underestimated their weight category, according to the poll of 2,065 people.
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Need a hand? Find someone humble
msnbc.msn.com - 1-3-12
If you need a helping hand, reach out to the most humble person you know.
In a study published online in the Journal of Positive Psychology, researchers found that humble folks are more likely to offer help to someone in need, compared to those who are, well, arrogant.
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Study Details How Dengue Infection Hits Harder The Second Time Around
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-3-12
One of the most vexing challenges in the battle against dengue virus, a mosquito-borne virus responsible for 50-100 million infections every year, is that getting infected once can put people at greater risk for a more severe infection down the road.
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Young Diabetics Struggle To Get Good Night's Sleep, Health, Behavior Problems Ensue
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-3-12
New research finds that many young people with type 1 diabetes struggle to get a good night's sleep and this leads to increased health and behavior problems, such as poorer control of blood sugar and worsening of academic performance. You can read a scientific paper on the findings by lead investigator Dr Michelle Perfect from the University of Arizona at Tucson, and colleagues, in the January's issue of the journal Sleep.
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Study: Fat hormone increases risk of dementia in women
cnn.com - 1-3-12
Some risk factors for dementia like getting old and having a family history cannot be prevented, but a new study shows that hormones produced in excess weight around the middle may be another risk factor, particularly for women.
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Spinal Manipulation, Home Exercise May Ease Neck Pain
healthday.com - 1-3-12
Spinal manipulation and home exercise are more effective at relieving neck pain in the long term than medications, according to new research.
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Study Looks at Deep Brain Stimulation in Bipolar Patients
healthday.com - 1-3-12
A small study suggests that deep brain stimulation, which is currently being investigated as a treatment for general depression, may also help patients with bipolar disorder.
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Lots of Exercise May Boost Kids' Grades
healthday.com - 1-3-12
A Dutch review of prior research reveals that the more physically active school-aged children are, the better they fare in the classroom.
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With Depression, Helping Others May in Turn Help You
healthday.com - 1-3-12
Doing something nice for someone else often leaves people feeling good about themselves and positive about their place in the world.
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The One-Cent Solution
popsci.com - 1-3-12
Twenty years ago, the Pentagon asked George M. Whitesides, a chemist at Harvard University, to invent a way to quickly detect anthrax and other biohazards in the field. His solution was a handheld device that used polymers to draw samples through a complex series of very small chemical baths. If biohazards were present, the chemicals would react.
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'Fuel additive' used in French breast implants
france24.com - 1-3-12
French breast implant manufacturer PIP used an untested fuel additive in its now-banned implants that have triggered a worldwide scare, French radio station RTL reported Monday.
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Why Older People Lose Their Memory
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-2-12
The stereotype of the old forgetful person whose memory often fails him is widely held, but the reason for its appearance was never really pinpointed. Much like gray hair and wrinkles, it was just thought to be part of growing old.
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States say it's time to rethink medical marijuana
cnn.com - 1-2-12
Medical marijuana advocates are hoping state governments can succeed where their efforts have failed by asking federal authorities to reclassify pot as a drug with medical use.
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MS may not be autoimmune disease
upi.com - 1-2-12
Multiple sclerosis, long viewed as primarily an autoimmune disease, is not actually a disease of the immune system, a U.S. researcher says.
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Aspirin-exacerbated disease tied to smoke
upi.com - 1-2-12
Adults with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease are more than three times as likely to have been exposed to secondhand smoke as kids, U.S. researchers say.
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Vitamin B12 may still help reduce stroke
upi.com - 1-2-12
Vitamin B therapy still has a role to play in reducing the risk of stroke, U.S. and Canadian researchers suggest.
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Improve character, improve school quality
upi.com - 1-1-12
A program in Hawaii to build students' social, emotional and character skills resulted in significantly improved overall quality of education, researchers say.
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Study finds most people are cooperative
upi.com - 1-1-12
About one-third of a given population may be willing to work cooperatively, researchers in Spain found.
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Hospitals are making room for alternative therapies
latimes.com - 1-1-12
More hospitals offer alternative treatments such as acupuncture and massage. Patient demand and profit are among the reasons, though many of the therapies have not been proved scientifically.
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Teenagers admit going too far sexually while drunk, leading to pregnancies and spread of diseases
dailymail.co.uk - 1-1-12
Alcohol is fuelling an epidemic of ‘risky sex’ among teenagers, senior doctors warned yesterday.
Many youngsters admit going ‘further than intended’ while drunk, according to the Royal College of Physicians.
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Revealed: true scale of breast implant scandal
telegraph.co.uk - 1-1-12
Andrew Lansley, the Health Secretary, has ordered an urgent review of faulty silicone breast implants given to more than 40,000 women, after an investigation showed the rupture rate could be seven times higher than British regulators previously believed.
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Human Skull Study Causes Evolutionary Headache
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-1-12
Scientists studying a unique collection of human skulls have shown that changes to the skull shape thought to have occurred independently through separate evolutionary events may have actually precipitated each other.
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Get Ready For Spring - Hay Fever Worse In Spring Than Summer
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-1-12
Hay fever (runny nose, sneezing, itchy eyes) is caused by an allergy to pollen, and most commonly to grass pollen. These tiny grains bring misery to sufferers through spring and summer and pollen levels are often included as part of weather reports to help sufferers prepare. However new research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Clinical and Translational Allergy shows that, regardless of medication and other allergies, for the same grass pollen levels, hay fever symptoms are worse in the first half of the season than later on.
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Top health stories of 2011
cnn.com - 1-1-12
The most deadly recorded listeria outbreak and concerns about nuclear radiation after Japan's biggest earthquake made major health headlines this year, along with several notable deaths to cancer and the inspiring recovery of a Congresswoman who suffered brain injuries from a gunshot wound.
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First 90 days after deployment critical
upi.com - 1-1-12
The first 90 days post-deployment are the most critical for U.S. military marriages, officials of a non-profit group that provides marriage assistance says.
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Global View of How HIV/AIDS Hijacks Cells During Infection
sciencedaily.com - 1-1-12
Gladstone Institutes scientist Nevan Krogan, PhD, has identified how HIV -- the virus that causes AIDS -- hijacks the body's own defenses to promote infection. This discovery could one day help curb the spread of the HIV/AIDS pandemic.
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Open Up and Say “Ahh”
cagle.com - 1-1-12
A recent Freedom of Information Act request has revealed that the FBI wants what it calls “food activists” prosecuted as terrorists, perhaps because nothing could more terrifying than exposing where our so-called food comes from and how it is manufactured.
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