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January, 2011 - Herbal and Health News

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Running-Related Injuries on the Rise in U.S. Kids: Study
healthday.com - 1-31-11
The number of running-related injuries suffered by American youngsters aged 6 to 18 increased 34 percent between 1994 and 2007, according to a new study.
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Listeria bug found in cheese can increase the risk of heart disease
dailymail.co.uk - 1-31-11
Deadly strains of a common food bug found in cheese and ready meals are 'uniquely adapted' to cause heart disease a study has found.
The Listeria varieties are most likely to target people with pre-existing heart problems, or who have had heart valve replacements, say researchers.
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Five volunteers had their Vitamin D levels tested and the results were shocking. They're all part of... Generation D
dailymail.co.uk - 1-31-11
Cover up. Use a high sun protection factor lotion. Avoid exposure between 10am and 2pm. These have long been the messages from doctors when it comes to avoiding the danger of spending time in the sun - namely, skin cancer. But it seems the experts were wrong.
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Era of leaded gasoline still poisoning vegetable gardens across America
naturalnews.com - 1-31-11
Vegetable gardens across the United States are contaminated with lead, even those using presumably safe soil from newly made compost, according to a study conducted by researchers from Wellesley College and presented at a meeting of the Geological Society of America.
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Kids fed unhealthy foods learn to prefer them
usatoday.com - 1-31-11
Most preschool children develop a taste for salt, sugar and fat at home, and quickly learn which types of brand-name fast foods and sodas meet these preferences, U.S. researchers say.
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Study: Rise in some cancers linked to oral sex
usatoday.com - 1-31-11
There's a worrisome uptick in the incidence of certain head and neck cancers among middle-aged and even younger Americans, and some experts link the trend to a rise in the popularity of oral sex over the past few decades.
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DNA Caught Rock 'N Rollin': On Rare Occasions DNA Dances Itself Into a Different Shape
sciencedaily.com - 1-31-11
DNA, that marvelous, twisty molecule of life, has an alter ego, research at the University of Michigan and the University of California, Irvine reveals.
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Study Confirms Broccoli and other Vegetables Prevent Cancer
usnewssource.com - 1-31-11
Broccoli and other vegetables are extremely healthy and have the ability to fight cancer. They contain antioxidants among other health benefits. For the first time, researchers have discovered how vegetables are blocking the genes that cause cancer. The result of the study has been published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.
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Birds use quantum theory to literally 'see' Earth's magnetic field as they fly
dailymail.co.uk - 1-30-11
Birds may be able to 'see' the Earth's electromagnetic field as they fly through the sky, scientists have suggested.
Many creatures, including all birds, navigate by sensing the direction of the magnetic forces around our planet to guide them.
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Eating trans-fat-laden fast food linked to depression
naturalnews.com - 1-30-11
A new study put forth by the universities of Navarra and Las Palmas de Gran Canaria in Spain have found that diets rich in trans-fats -- like the kind found in most fast food meals -- increase the risk of depression by 50 percent. Even in Europe, where trans-fat consumption is far lower than in the U.S., depression rates are considerably higher among trans-fat-consuming populations.
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Mini-Strokes Leave 'Hidden' Brain Damage
sciencedaily.com - 1-30-11
Each year, approximately 150,000 Canadians have a transient ischemic attack (TIA), sometimes known as a mini-stroke. New research published January 28 in Stroke, the journal of the American Heart Association shows these attacks may not be transient at all. They in fact create lasting damage to the brain.
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FDA Panel Recommends Testing of Electroshock Devices
healthday.com - 1-30-11
An advisory panel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration decided on Friday that electroconvulsive (also known as "electroshock") devices should be subject to the same tough testing as other medical devices entering the market.
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Study ties hot flashes to lower breast cancer risk
usatoday.com - 1-30-11
Here's some good news for women ever bothered by hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms: Your risk for breast cancer may be reduced as much as 50%, researchers from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle report.
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The Organic Elite Surrenders to Monsanto: What Now?
organicconsumers.org - 1-29-11
In the wake of a 12-year battle to keep Monsanto's Genetically Engineered (GE) crops from contaminating the nation's 25,000 organic farms and ranches, America's organic consumers and producers are facing betrayal. A self-appointed cabal of the Organic Elite, spearheaded by Whole Foods Market, Organic Valley, and Stonyfield Farm, has decided it's time to surrender to Monsanto.
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Mental health hits a low for college freshmen
usatoday.com - 1-29-11
College freshmen's emotional health hit an all-time low this academic year, reflecting the stress of wanting to succeed and the cost of acquiring a quality education during a struggling economy, a report from UCLA's Higher Education Research Institute says.
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Middle class women twice as likely to be heavy drinkers
dailymail.co.uk - 1-29-11
Middle-class women are more than twice as likely to drink heavily as those on lower incomes, official figures show.
Some 43 per cent of women whose household income exceeds more than £1,000 a week drink excessively at least one night a week, compared with just 17 per cent of those whose average income is £200.
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Pets poisoned by your pills, group says
msnbc.msn.com - 1-29-11
Human medications including dropped pills sickened more pets in the United States last year than any other toxin.
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Monsanto's Roundup Triggers Over 40 Plant Diseases and Endangers Human and Animal Health
naturalnews.com - 1-29-11
The following article reveals the devastating and unprecedented impact that Monsanto's Roundup herbicide is having on the health of our soil, plants, animals, and human population.
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No cure in sight for fighting the common cold
usatoday.com - 1-29-11
Americans catch an estimated 1 billion colds each year.
And by this time of year, as weary cold sufferers line up at local pharmacies, it may not sound surprising that Americans spend at least $4.2 billion annually on over-the-counter cough and cold medications and even more on alternative therapies.
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Cancer Drug Aids Regeneration of Spinal Cord After Injuries
sciencedaily.com - 1-29-11
After a spinal cord injury a number of factors impede the regeneration of nerve cells. Two of the most important of these factors are the destabilization of the cytoskeleton and the development of scar tissue. While the former prevents regrowth of cells, the latter creates a barrier for severed nerve cells. Scientists of the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried and their colleagues from the Kennedy Krieger Institute and University of Miami in the United States, and the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands, have now shown that the cancer drug Taxol reduces both regeneration obstacles.
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Earlier Hormone Therapy Elevates Risk of Breast Cancer, Researchers Say
nytimes.com - 1-29-11
Growing evidence about the risks of breast cancer and other serious illnesses posed by hormone therapy for menopause has led many women to give up the drugs, and many doctors to stop recommending them.
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Exercise Helps Ease Irritable Bowel Symptoms
healthday.com - 1-29-11
Increasing one's physical activity routine can help improve symptoms among irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients, Swedish researchers report.
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'Western' Diet May Raise Risk of Kidney Function Decline
healthday.com - 1-29-11
A Western-type diet that's high in red and processed meats, saturated fats and sweets is associated with an increased risk of kidney function decline, a new study reveals.
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Docs Rate Almost 1 in 5 Patients as 'Difficult': Study
healthday.com - 1-29-11
A new study finds that about 18 percent of patients are considered difficult, and they're more likely than others to stay sick.
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Will there be a chocolate drought? World's supply of sustainable cocoa could run out by 2014
dailymail.co.uk - 1-29-11
The world faces a chocolate 'drought' over the next few years, an expert warned yesterday.
Political unrest in the Ivory Coast, where 40 per cent of the world's cocoa beans are grown, has 'significantly' depleted the number of certified fair trade cocoa farmers.
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Nap 'as good as a full night's sleep'
news.bbc.co.uk - 1-28-11
Grabbing an hour's sleep during the day may be as beneficial as a whole night in bed, according to scientists.
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Mutant mosquitoes: Malaysia release of genetically modified insects sparks fears of uncontrollable new species
dailymail.co.uk - 1-28-11
Malaysia has released 6,000 genetically modified mosquitoes into a forest in the first experiment of its kind in Asia aimed at curbing dengue fever.
The field test is meant to pave the way for the official use of genetically engineered Aedes aegypti male mosquitoes to mate with females and produce offspring with shorter lives, thus curtailing the population.
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Feeling SAD? How to cope when the sun goes away
msnbc.msn.com - 1-28-11
Winter, for those who live far from the equator, means cooler temperatures, fewer daylight hours and occasional pangs of "winter blues." While these feelings of mild malaise come and go easily for some, each winter signifies a new, unshakable cycle of depression for Rebecca Davis that is more serious.
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Alzheimer's called 'defining disease' of baby boomers
pagingdrgupta.blogs.cnn.com - 1-28-11
As any family who has gone through it can tell you, Alzheimer's disease is tragic on a number of levels. Once vibrant men and women become shells of the people they once were. Not only do memories fade, there also is anger. And loneliness. Former first lady Nancy Reagan famously referred to it as "the long goodbye."
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Social networking leads to isolation, not more connections, say academics
naturalnews.com - 1-28-11
Modern society seems convinced that social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter keep them connected and thriving socially with their friends and peers. But a new book called Alone Together by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) professor Sherry Turkle says otherwise, purporting that social networks are more like mutual isolation networks that detach people from meaningful interactions with one another and make them less human.
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Insomnia damages relationships, according to study
bbc.co.uk - 1-28-11
Lack of sleep needs to be treated as a major health issue, according to a report published by the Mental Health Foundation.
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Cyclists are 'unaware of the risks from pollution'
bbc.co.uk - 1-28-11
Cycling is a great way to get around cities and become fit at the same time - but do cyclists get enough public health information about the damage air pollution could be doing to their lungs?
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Life Expectancy Lags in the U.S.
medpagetoday.com - 1-28-11
Life expectancy in the U.S. lags behind that of many other high-income countries and is currently ranked by the United Nations at number 28, despite spending the most on healthcare, according to a National Academy of Sciences report.
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Babies Seem to Sense Who's Boss
healthday.com - 1-28-11
Even babies seem to know that might makes right, according to new research that suggests infants use size as a measure to predict who will prevail when two individuals have a conflict.
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TV: A Sneaky Part of the Food Pyramid
healthday.com - 1-28-11
David Burley was excited about a new restaurant opening in his small Louisiana town, where vacant storefronts have become the norm as the recession lingers.
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How humans are 97% the same as orangutans: New research shows how DNA matches
dailymail.co.uk - 1-28-11
Orangutans may be more closely related to humans than scientists previously thought, a new genetic study has shown.
The first blueprint of the orangutan genetic code has confirmed that they share 97 per cent of their DNA with people.
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FDA Mulls Future of Electroshock Therapy
health.com - 1-27-11
Electroshock therapy today bears little resemblance to its lurid depictions in Hollywood dramas like One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.
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Obese pregnant women have more complicated births: research
telegraph.co.uk - 1-27-11
Women who were overweight or obese before they conceived were more likely to have a longer pregnancy, need to have labour induced artificially and to go on to require caesarean section births.
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Combination of essential oils halts PMS
naturalnews.com - 1-27-11
When a young woman is moody or bursts into tears easily, it's not unusual for someone to joke "oh, it must be near her 'time of the month'." But if you actually suffer from Pre-Menstrual Syndrome (PMS), the truth is there's not much funny about it at all.
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False Foundations of Science: Can Vaccine Studies Be Trusted?
naturalnews.com - 1-27-11
Many "scientific" studies are literally nonsense. This is not a conspiracy theory. For example, the Journal of the American Medical Association [2005;294(2):218-28] published a paper showing that one-third of "highly cited original clinical research studies" were eventually contradicted by subsequent studies. The supposed effects of specific interventions either did not exist as the original studies concluded, or were exaggerated. It is not unusual for the "science" of today to degenerate into tomorrow's fiction.
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Natural Growth Factor Enhances Memory, Prevents Forgetting in Rats
sciencedaily.com - 1-27-11
A naturally occurring growth factor significantly boosted retention and prevented forgetting of a fear memory when injected into rats' memory circuitry during time-limited windows when memories become fragile and changeable. In the study funded by the National Institutes of Health, animals treated with insulin-like growth factor (IGF-II) excelled at remembering to avoid a location where they had previously experienced a mild shock.
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Household Bugs: A Risk to Human Health?
sciencedaily.com - 1-27-11
Superbugs are not just a problem in hospitals but could be also coming from our animal farms. Research published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Microbiology indicates insects could be responsible for spreading antibiotic resistant bacteria from pigs to humans.
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Ancient Body Clock Discovered That Helps Keep All Living Things on Time
sciencedaily.com - 1-27-11
The mechanism that controls the internal 24-hour clock of all forms of life from human cells to algae has been identified by scientists.
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Stop, rewind: the scientists slowing the ageing process
bbc.co.uk - 1-27-11
Scientists are slowly unlocking the secrets of ageing, and some suggest treatments may soon be at hand to slow or even reverse the ageing process.
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Insomnia damages relationships, according to study
bbc.co.uk - 1-27-11
Lack of sleep needs to be treated as a major health issue, according to a report published by the Mental Health Foundation.
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105 Million in U.S. Have Diabetes or Prediabetes, CDC Says
healthday.com - 1-27-11
Diabetes now affects nearly 26 million Americans of all ages and 79 million people have what doctors call "prediabetes," according to 2011 estimates released Wednesday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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FDA Says Breast Implants Linked to Rare Cancer
healthday.com - 1-27-11
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Wednesday that breast implants may be linked to a heightened risk for a rare cancer, as evidenced in a small but growing number of cases that have been reported in recent years.
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Abortion Typically Doesn't Harm Mental Health: Study
healthday.com - 1-27-11
Women who undergo an abortion don't seem to face a greatly increased risk of mental health problems after having the procedure, a new study suggests.
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Alcohol-related liver disease in young people up 50% in a decade
telegraph.co.uk - 1-26-11
The number of young people having to be treated in hospital for serious liver disease has risen by more than 50 per cent in the last decade, figures show.
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GMO lies: Deliberate misuse of the term "genetically modified" designed to mislead people.
naturalnews.com - 1-26-11
It's one of the most common false arguments of GMO pushers: There's nothing to be worried about with genetically modified foods, they argue, because almost everything is genetically modified, they claim. What they're referring to is the genetic selection used in the long, slow development of many crops such as wheat, which originally began as a grass but was shaped generation after generation through the selection of larger seeds, ultimately leading to modern-day wheat..
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Common weed petty spurge 'could treat' skin cancer
bbc.co.uk - 1-26-11
Sap from the common garden weed petty spurge appears to treat non-melanoma skin cancers, experts are reporting in the British Journal of Dermatology.
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Smoking, Obesity Slowing U.S. Life Expectancy Gains: Report
healthday.com - 1-26-11
Longevity isn't increasing as fast in the United States as it is in other developed countries, says a new report that points a finger at high rates of smoking and obesity.
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'Stroke Centers' Providing Better Care, Study Finds
healthday.com - 1-26-11
Designated stroke centers seem to be saving lives, new research finds.
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Loud Road Noise Linked to Stroke in Older Adults
healthday.com - 1-26-11
Prolonged exposure to loud traffic noise is strongly associated with stroke in people aged 65 and older, a new Danish study finds.
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Vision: Making Inroads in Macular Degeneration
nytimes.com - 1-25-11
In 2004, scientists at the National Eye Institute predicted that as the population aged, the rate of macular degeneration, an incurable eye disease with no known cause, would increase substantially. They appear to have been wrong.
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Report: USDA also knew about bee-killing pesticide
naturalnews.com - 1-25-11
Neonicotinoids, a class of insecticides that attack insects' central nervous systems, are increasingly being linked to killing off bees, bats and other pollinators that are essential for growing food. And a two-year-old report just now being released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) adds to the growing body of evidence that these toxic insecticides are a serious threat to not only bees, but also to humans.
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"Unscientific" is secret code for anyone who opposes GMOs or pesticides
naturalnews.com - 1-25-11
Watch out for the word "unscientific" in propaganda that's pushing GMOs, pesticides or other dangerous chemicals onto our world. In a joint letter to USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack, three Republican members of Congress (Rep. Frank Lucas, Sen. Saxby Chambliss, Sen. Pat Roberts) attempted to spin GMOs as being "scientific."
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Farmers forced to buy expensive chemical arsenals to control pesticide-resistant 'superweeds'
naturalnews.com - 1-25-11
Genetically-modified (GM) crops require an intensive, regular application of pesticides and herbicides as part of their proprietary cultivation regimen. But the consequences of growing GMs has been the emergence of pesticide- and herbicide-resistant superweeds, which have gotten so out of control that farmers are now having to buy all sorts of expensive new "post-application" chemical treatments just to keep the invaders even somewhat at bay.
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New Microscopy Method Opens Window on Previously Unseen Cell Features
sciencedaily.com - 1-25-11
Despite the sophistication and range of contemporary microscopy techniques, many important biological phenomena still elude the precision of even the most sensitive tools. The need for refined imaging methods for fundamental research and biomedical applications related to the study of disease remains acute.
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Chopin 'probably had epilepsy'
bbc.co.uk - 1-25-11
The famous composer Fryderyk Chopin, who was hounded by hallucinations during his relatively short life, probably had epilepsy, say doctors.
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Deep Brain Stimulation Might Ease Tough-to-Treat Hypertension
healthday.com - 1-25-11
Doctors administering deep brain stimulation to control a patient's severe pain report that they discovered the treatment consistently lowered the man's hard-to-control high blood pressure.
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Self-Control Could Turn Kids Into Successful Adults
healthday.com - 1-25-11
Children with the most self-control at 3 years old become the healthiest, wealthiest and most successful adults, new research finds.
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Stress-Reduction Therapy May Help Heart Disease Patients
healthday.com - 1-25-11
A stress management program based on cognitive behavioral therapy may reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke and death in patients with heart disease, Swedish researchers report.
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Medical Marijuana Companies Formulating "Soda Pot" Drinks
dailyhealthreport.org - 1-25-11
With the growing discussions and actual legalization of marijuana for medical usage, certain manufacturers will soon have a new 'treat' for those who can legally ingest marijuana.
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Heart disease costs to triple in U.S. by 2030
msnbc.msn.com - 1-24-11
The costs of heart disease in the United States will triple between now and 2030, to more than $800 billion a year, a report commissioned by the American Heart Association predicted Monday.
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Real-life horror: First video reveals how malaria parasite invades and destroys human blood cells
dailymail.co.uk - 1-24-11
A malaria parasite has been caught on camera for the first time breaking and entering human red bloods cell before savagely destroying them from the inside.
The Plasmodium parasite transmits malaria via the bite of infected mosquitoes. The infectious disease kills one million people every year and infects 400 million.
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Alcohol and poor diet linked to UK breast cancer rates
telegraph.co.uk - 1-24-11
Women in Britain are more likely to be be diagnosed with breast cancer than those in most other developed countries because of their unhealthy lifestyles, according to a new study.
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Avocado fat boosts good cholesterol (HDL)
naturalnews.com - 1-24-11
The types of fat found in avocados and in olive oil boost levels of HDL ("good") cholesterol without raising levels of LDL ("bad") cholesterol, according to a study conducted by researchers from the University of Toronto and St. Michael's Hospital in Ontario, Canada, and published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.
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Pesticides give rise to mutant bed bugs
naturalnews.com - 1-24-11
Bedbugs are coming back with a vengeance, and a new study out of Ohio State University says that pesticides and insecticides are at least jointly responsible for spawning a new breed of mutant bedbugs that is genetically-resistant to the very chemicals commonly used to eradicate it.
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Long-Distance Migration May Help Reduce Infectious Disease Risks for Many Animal Species
sciencedaily.com - 1-24-11
It's a common assumption that animal migration, like human travel across the globe, can transport pathogens long distances, in some cases increasing disease risks to humans. West Nile Virus, for example, spread rapidly along the East coast of the U.S., most likely due to the movements of migratory birds.
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Contagious Cancer Thrives in Dogs by Adopting Host's Genes
sciencedaily.com - 1-24-11
A curious contagious cancer, found in dogs, wolves and coyotes, can repair its own genetic mutations by adopting genes from its host animal, according to a new study in the journal Science.
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TB vaccine protects before and after exposure
bbc.co.uk - 1-24-11
A new vaccine that can fight tuberculosis (TB) before and after infection has been developed by Danish scientists.
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Surgeon General Pushes Breastfeeding
abcnews.go.com - 1-24-11
Americans should be more supportive of breastfeeding, the U.S. Surgeon General said Thursday.
At a press briefing flanked by breastfeeding advocates -- including director Spike Lee's wife, Tonya Lewis Lee -- Dr. Regina Benjamin detailed the plans of her "Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding," which includes greater cultural support of nursing at work, at home, and in the community.
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'Bug Mac' and lovely 'grub': food of the future
breitbart.com - 1-24-11
Dutch student Walinka van Tol inspects the worm protruding from a half-eaten chocolate praline she's holding, steels herself with a shrug, then pops it into her mouth.
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WikiLeaks Unveil Vatican's Secret Approval Of GMOs
care2.com - 1-24-11
As the debate over whether or not GMOs are fit for public consumption waxes hotter all over the world, the Catholic Church has been conspicuously silent on whether or not it endorses this biotechnology.
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10 Worst Jobs for Your Lungs
health.com - 1-23-11
Nearly 23,000 workers developed job-related lung disease in 2008, the U.S. Department of Labor estimates. More than 16,000 people die from it each year.
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Your Period Problems Solved: What's Normal, What's Not, and What to Do About It
health.com - 1-23-11
our period comes at the same time every month...except when it doesn't. Suddenly, without warning, you're early or late, or your flow is heavy, light, or nonexistent (and you know you're not pregnant!). You and millions of women understandably wonder, Is this normal or is something terribly wrong?
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Shingles Hard to Bear, Vaccine Hard to Get
abcnews.go.com - 1-23-11
When Kathy Yager awoke with a red bump on her forehead, she wrote it off as a mosquito bite. But later that day she had three painful welts above her right eye. She went to her doctor, who diagnosed her with shingles.
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Breath test to tell when the fat starts to burn off in the gym
telegraph.co.uk - 1-23-11
A breathalyser that can reveal how much fat you are burning off at the gym is being developed by British scientists.
The device is being built to pinpoint the moment when a sweaty session on the treadmill finally starts to pay off by detecting when the body has used up its supply of food energy and switches to breaking down fat instead.
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Bedbug War Continues; Scientists Study Bug Genome for Weaknesses
abcnews.go.com - 1-22-11
Researchers Say Some Bugs May Have Pesticide-Resistant Genes.
As the war on bedbugs wears on, scientists try to understand the invasive pests so they can kill the suckers.
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Daily pill for people with MS 'in months'
telegraph.co.uk - 1-22-11
The first daily pill for multiple sclerosis (MS) could be available in Britain within a few months.
At the moment people whose MS returns frequently have to inject themselves with a drug as often as every day to control their symptoms, or travel to hospital for treatment.
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USDA found to be poisoning bird populations, causing mass die-offs involving millions of birds
naturalnews.com - 1-22-11
Not all the mysterious bird die-offs that have been witnessed around the globe recently are due to unexplained causes. A recent mass die-off event witnessed in Yankton, South Dakota was traced back to the USDA which admitted to carrying out a mass poisoning of the birds.
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Mindfulness Meditation Training Changes Brain Structure in Eight Weeks
sciencedaily.com - 1-22-11
Participating in an 8-week mindfulness meditation program appears to make measurable changes in brain regions associated with memory, sense of self, empathy and stress. In a study that will appear in the January 30 issue of Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, a team led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers report the results of their study, the first to document meditation-produced changes over time in the brain's grey matter.
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Breastfeeding benefit to cancer survivors, says review
bbc.co.uk - 1-22-11
Women who have survived childhood cancer could benefit if they breastfeed their own children, according to research.
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Yoga's Spiritual Balance May Boost Health
healthday.com - 1-22-11
Yoga may be becoming more of a mainstream approach to Americans' health woes.
People have been practicing yoga for millennia to improve their strength, serenity and wellness, but its roots in ancient Indian philosophy have kept the exercise discipline firmly within the realm of alternative medicine.
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Congress introduces bill to stop upcoming ban of incandescent light bulbs
naturalnews.com - 1-22-11
In 2007, the U.S. Congress passed the Energy Independence and Security Act which contains a subsection that bans the sale of incandescent light bulbs beginning in 2012. But the new Congress recently unveiled the Better Use of Light Bulbs Act, or H.R. 91, which would repeal this subsection and restore Americans' freedom of choice to buy the light bulbs of their choice.
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Feds Probe Post-Flu Shot Seizures Among Kids
cbsnews.com - 1-22-11
Government officials are investigating an apparent increase in fever-related seizures in young children after they got a flu shot.
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Hundreds of Yankton, South Dakota birds poisoned by USDA
ktiv.com - 1-21-11
It's happened in places like Louisiana, Arkansas and Kentucky. Hundreds of birds mysteriously found dead.
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Pill to combat skin cancer just a year away
timesofindia.indiatimes.com - 1-21-11
In what could revolutionise the treatment for malignant melanoma, scientists have developed a new pill which they say significantly improves survival rates of patients suffering from the deadliest form of skin cancer.
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Forget the fry-up, just have coffee and an aspirin if you want to cure your hangover
dailymail.co.uk - 1-21-11
A fry-up, hair of the dog, raw eggs…ideas for what will cure a hangover are as plentiful as the types of drink that will start one.
But the best treatment for a sore head is more prosaic, say researchers – an aspirin and a coffee.
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Girl, 12, at risk of rickets... because mum smothered her with factor 50
dailymail.co.uk - 1-21-11
Living by the beach in one of the sunniest parts of the country, Lisa Attrill made sure her daughter wore plenty of high-factor suncream when she played outside.
But her good intentions left 12-year-old Tyler suffering from a vitamin deficiency linked to the bone disease rickets.
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Woman speaks after 11 years of silence following voice-box transplant
telegraph.co.uk - 1-21-11
A woman has been able to speak for the first time in 11 years following the second voice box transplant ever carried out.
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A self-sufficient system of farming is increasing yields across Hawaii
staradvertiser.com - 1-21-11
Farmer Samson Delos Reyes reached into his bluejeans pocket to grab a phone call from a buyer and ended up smiling but shaking his head.
The caller wanted to triple her order of his pungent Thai basil, to 60 from 20 cases a week, but S&J Farms of Waianae is already booked solid.
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Stress, Anxiety Both Boon and Bane to Brain
sciencedaily.com - 1-21-11
A cold dose of fear lends an edge to the here-and-now -- say, when things go bump in the night.
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Drug 'Khat' Makes Users More Impulsive
sciencedaily.com - 1-21-11
Researchers at the universities of Leiden, Amsterdam and Granada were the first to investigate the effects of the drug khat on a person's ability to inhibit undesirable behaviour. Frequent use was shown to decrease self-control, with all the potentially dangerous consequences this implies. In view of the increased number of khat users, this is an alarming development.
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Pill slows spread of skin cancer in half of cases
bbc.co.uk - 1-21-11
A new drug for skin cancer can slow the spread of the disease in half of patients, thereby extending their lives, a study says.
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Nearly Half of Americans Still Suspect Vaccine-Autism Link
healthday.com - 1-21-11
Just a slim majority of Americans -- 52 percent -- think vaccines don't cause autism, a new Harris Interactive/HealthDay poll found.
Conversely, 18 percent are convinced that vaccines, like the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, can cause the disorder, and another 30 percent aren't sure.
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'Cat eye syndrome' makes eyes look feline
bodyodd.msnbc.msn.com - 1-20-11
Stacy Lipson writes: When Kathleen Neely was a kid, her eyes were a bit different from other people. While the left was blue, the right was green, and it was smaller -- oh, and it looked like it could belong to a cat.
Neely was born with cat eye syndrome, a condition marked in some patients by a congenital defect of the iris called a coloboma, which causes the pupil of that eye to look keyhole-shaped, much like a cat eye.
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Questions over statin prescribing
bbc.co.uk - 1-20-11
Healthy people may derive no benefit from taking cholesterol-lowering statins, according to a review of previous studies.
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Kidney cancer linked to mutated gene
bbc.co.uk - 1-20-11
A mutated gene has been found in a third of patients with the most common form of kidney cancer.
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Bedbugs Reveal Their Genetic Secrets in Lab Study
healthday.com - 1-20-11
Scientists studying the genetics of bedbugs believe they know how the critters become resistant to pesticides, and the finding could someday help drive them from homes, stores and offices across the United States.
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Survey: US Doctors Fear Healthcare Reform
cnbc.com - 1-20-11
Nearly two-thirds of U.S. doctors surveyed fear healthcare reform could worsen care for patients, by flooding their offices and hurting income, according to a Thomson Reuters survey released Tuesday.
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'Man flu' evidence mounts
telegraph.co.uk - 1-19-11
Researchers have found new evidence that 'man flu' does exist - in their heads at least.
They discovered that men "overrate" the symptoms of a common cold while women do not.
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You don't need a bronzer for a golden glow, just eat lots of fruit and veggies
naturalnews.com - 1-19-11
Looking a bit pale and even pasty this winter? If you can't fly to the tropics to get a tan, you don't have to turn to bronzers and make-up to make your skin glow. New research headed by Dr. Ian Stephen at the University of Nottingham in Great Britain concludes that eating a diet rich in fruit and vegetables can give you an even more healthy golden skin tone than the sun -- without the use of make-up.
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Total Blueberry Pomegranate cereal from General Mills contains no blueberries and no pomegranates
naturalnews.com - 1-19-11
A cereal offered by General Mills called "Total Blueberry Pomegranate" cereal has been characterized as a "total fraud" by investigative journalist Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, as part of a non-profit Food Investigations documentary being shown at www.FoodInvestigations.com
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New Hope in Fight Against Huntington's Disease
sciencedaily.com - 1-19-11
Hope for new ways of treating devastating neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease has been raised by a trans-Atlantic team of researchers thanks to the use of cutting-edge genetic techniques.
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Scientists Bring Cancer Cells Back Under Control
sciencedaily.com - 1-19-11
Scientists at The University of Nottingham have brought cancer cells back under normal control -- by reactivating their cancer suppressor genes. The discovery could form a powerful new technology platform for the treatment of cancer of the breast and other cancers.
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Scientific Evidence Supports Effectiveness of Chinese Drug for Cataracts
sciencedaily.com - 1-19-11
Scientists are reporting a scientific basis for the long-standing belief that a widely used non-prescription drug in China and certain other countries can prevent and treat cataracts, a clouding of the lens of the eye that is a leading cause of vision loss worldwide.
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Problem Drinkers Marry Later, Break Up Sooner: Study
healthday.com - 1-19-11
In a study finding that may not surprise the families of problem drinkers, drinking can have a strong negative impact on how long it takes someone to get married and how long the marriage will survive.
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One in 12 Fans Leaves Major Sports Events Drunk: Study
healthday.com - 1-19-11
As the final round of the NFL playoffs approaches this weekend, consider this sobering fact from a new study: One in every 12 fans leaving major sporting events is intoxicated.
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Tests Show Promise for Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's
nytimes.com - 1-19-11
Researchers are reporting major advances toward resolving two underlying problems involving Alzheimer's disease: How do you know if someone who is demented has it? And how can you screen the general population to see who is at risk?
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Warfarin Use May Raise Risk of Death From Traumatic Injuries
healthday.com - 1-18-11
New research shows that the risk of dying after suffering a traumatic injury is much higher for people taking warfarin, the most commonly used blood thinner in America.
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Dieting while pregnant can lower your baby's IQ
dailymail.co.uk - 1-18-11
Expectant mothers who diet during pregnancy are putting their babies at risk of low IQs and behavioural problems, scientists say.
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Why a simple stomach bug could mean you'll never be able to eat dairy again
dailymail.co.uk - 1-18-11
When Abbie Wigley and her friends came down with upset tummies after a barbecue, it was blamed on undercooked chicken.
Yet while the others had recovered within 48 hours, two weeks later she was still -suffering with diarrhoea, bloating and -crippling stomach cramps.
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Antibiotics increase risk of IBS and Crohn's disease in children
dailymail.co.uk - 1-18-11
Children given antibiotics are twice as likely to develop digestive problems, research shows.
Those prescribed penicillin and similar medicines are more at risk from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and Crohn's disease.
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Soothing Sore Muscles With Ginger
well.blogs.nytimes.com - 1-18-11
Can a dose of ginger help you recover after a workout?
In this week's "Really?" column, Anahad O'Connor examines whether ginger, the popular remedy for a queasy stomach, can also reduce soreness after exercise.
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Muscle Tone May Play a Role in GERD
health.com - 1-18-11
Reduced muscle tone in the esophagus may be the cause of acid reflux disease, new research suggests.
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Depression, Burnout Make Surgeons Mull Suicide
abcnews.go.com - 1-18-11
In a national survey, one in 16 surgeons reported contemplating suicide, researchers reported.
An increased risk of suicidal ideation was linked to three factors: depression, burnout, and the perception of having made a recent major medical error, according to Dr. Tait Shanafelt of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues.
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Rickets comeback due to 'lack of sunshine exposure'
bbc.co.uk - 1-18-11
"This is a problem of lifestyle in children across the social classes," Southampton orthopaedic surgeon Prof Nicholas Clarke reflects on the rise in cases of rickets.
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Breast cancer breakthrough: vitamin D in combination with sun exposure is key to prevention
naturalnews.com - 1-18-11
As NaturalNews has covered for years, researchers have found a profound link between breast cancer and low levels of vitamin D (http://www.naturalnews.com/023264_V...). Women with the lowest blood levels have the highest breast cancer risk and those dying of metastasized disease are the most vitamin D deficient of all. Scientists have theorized vitamin D has anti-cancer properties that influence cell growth, healthy cell differentiation and programmed cell death (apoptosis).
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Garlic fights athlete's foot; try herbal remedies for night sweats
bradenton.com - 1-18-11
Do you have any home remedies for athlete's foot? I have been using over-the-counter antifungal creams, with marginal success. If I wear nylons, I have an outbreak almost immediately.
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New hope for hepatitis C, an often hidden disease
usatoday.com - 1-18-11
There's new hope for an overlooked epidemic: Two powerful drugs are nearing the market that promise to help cure many more people of liver-attacking hepatitis C - even though most who have the simmering infection don't know it yet.
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Magnetically Controlled Pill Could Boost Body's Absorption of Drugs
sciencedaily.com - 1-18-11
Do you want that in a pill or a shot? A pill, thank you, but most patients never have that choice. The problem with administering many medications orally is that a pill often will not dissolve at exactly the right site in the gastrointestinal tract where the medicine can be absorbed into the bloodstream. A new magnetic pill system developed by Brown University researchers could solve the problem by safely holding a pill in place in the intestine wherever it needs to be.
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Smoking linked to earlier male deaths
bbc.co.uk - 1-18-11
Smoking is the main reason why on average men die sooner than women across Europe, according to research.
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Your Genes Help You Choose Your Friends, Study Says
healthday.com - 1-18-11
Your friends aren't just people you enjoy: You tend to befriend others with similar or complementary genes, a new study suggests.
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Despite Claims, Many Daily Moisturizers Don't Shield Against Sun: Study
healthday.com - 1-18-11
Few facial skin creams that promise "broad-spectrum" sun protection actually measure up, according to new research.
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New Osteoporosis Screening Recommendations Issued
healthday.com - 1-18-11
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has just expanded its osteoporosis screening recommendation to include younger women who have risk factors for the debilitating disease, which causes bones to become abnormally brittle and prone to fracture.
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Inadequate Fight Against Drugs Hampers Russia's Ability to Curb H.I.V.
nytimes.com - 1-17-11
They look like addicts anywhere in the world: tattered and vacant-eyed, they circle Moscow pharmacies known to sell prescription drugs illicitly, looking for something to inject for a quick high.
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Can you control your dreams?
cnn.com - 1-17-11
Life doesn't always go the way you want, but sometimes dreams do.
A lucid dreamer is a person who is aware that he or she is dreaming and is able to manipulate the plot and outcome of the dream, like a video game. It is not uncommon, and in children it can happen frequently, even as an expression of creativity, said Gary Schwartz, professor of psychology and neurology at the University of Arizona.
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Advocacy Groups Mum on Pharma Ties
abcnews.go.com - 1-17-11
Most health advocacy groups that portray themselves as grassroots organizations fail to disclose the pharmaceutical company grants they receive, researchers said.
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Organic milk is less fatty than 'ordinary' milk
telegraph.co.uk - 1-17-11
Researchers have found that organic milk generally contained less saturated fat and more good fatty acids than milk produced at intensive commercial dairy farms.
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Bananas, herbs may help prevent HIV transmission
naturalnews.com - 1-17-11
A study published in the March 19, 2010, issue of The Journal of Biological Chemistry found that banana lectins, the proteins that bind to sugars, also bind to HIV-infected cells and prevent their replication and transmission. And several other studies have found similar anti-HIV effects from various herbs and plants like the hyssop herb, pine cone seed extracts, "pokeweed" extracts, Reishi mushrooms and even cannabis (marijuana).
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Sense of Touch May Influence Gender Perception
healthday.com - 1-17-11
The sense of touch influences your perceptions of masculinity and femininity, according to a new study.
In one experiment, volunteers who were shown gender-neutral faces were more likely to judge them as male if they were squeezing a hard ball while viewing the faces and as female if they were squeezing a soft ball.
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Dow AgroSciences Says Proposed Phase Out of Food Tolerances for Sulfuryl Fluoride Would Hinder Protection of the U.S. Food Supply
businesswire.com - 1-16-11
Dow AgroSciences is disappointed with EPA's announcement of a proposal for a multi-year phase out of food tolerances for sulfuryl fluoride, a material important to the sustainability of the U.S. food supply. EPA's proposed action offers no meaningful public health or environmental benefits and would actually detract from U.S. public health goals.
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Warning signs from a troubled mind: What parents should do
cnn.com - 1-16-11
After the shooting that left six dead in Tucson, Arizona, last Saturday, a portrait emerged of alleged gunman Jared Lee Loughner as an angry, disturbed young man.
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Doctor Fired After Revealing Testing Flaws
abcnews.go.com - 1-16-11
A cardiologist whose research at a national medical meeting revealed that other doctors at her hospital were misreading a substantial number of diagnostic echocardiograms has been fired by that hospital, the Journal Sentinel and MedPage Today have learned.
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Forty new legal highs made in China are being sold in Britain
telegraph.co.uk - 1-16-11
At least 40 new "legal high" drugs have flooded into Britain in the past year sparking fears they could lead to a spate of deaths.
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Five Steps to a Healthier Heart
healthday.com - 1-16-11
Five simple steps can help lower your risk of heart disease, says a leading expert on preventive cardiology.
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Smoking Damages DNA Within Minutes, Research Shows
healthday.com - 1-16-11
Cigarettes start to destroy a smoker's DNA within minutes of inhaling, new research indicates, suggesting that the habit causes immediate genetic damage and quickly raises the short-term risk for cancer.
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What is Diverticulitis?
botanical.com - 1-15-11
Diverticulitis is a condition that occurs when one (or more) of the diverticula in the digestive tract become infected or inflamed. The diverticula are tiny pouches that can develop in any part of the digestive system. They most commonly occur, however, in the large intestine.
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Rural GPs' practices could be lost, warn doctors
telegraph.co.uk - 1-15-11
Rural GPs' practices could be lost and doctor patient relationships damaged under Government plans to increase choice in the NHS, leading doctors have warned.
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Study reveals top ten violence-inducing prescription drugs
naturalnews.com - 1-15-11
The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) recently published a study in the journal PLoS One highlighting the worst prescription drug offenders that cause patients to become violent. Among the top-ten most dangerous are the antidepressants Pristiq (desvenlafaxine), Paxil (paroxetine) and Prozac (fluoxetine).
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Why Coffee Protects Against Diabetes
sciencedaily.com - 1-15-11
Coffee, that morning elixir, may give us an early jump-start to the day, but numerous studies have shown that it also may be protective against type 2 diabetes. Yet no one has really understood why.
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Bioactive Compounds in Berries Can Reduce High Blood Pressure
sciencedaily.com - 1-15-11
Eating blueberries can guard against high blood pressure, according to new research by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and Harvard University.
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Brain Scans Show Married Love Can Last
healthday.com - 1-15-11
Remember the intensity of falling madly in love? Ever feel like the passing years, the never-ending housework and the demands of raising a family and working have quashed your infatuation for your spouse?
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New Guidelines Released for Stroke Care
healthday.com - 1-15-11
Improving how quickly stroke patients are diagnosed and treated is the cornerstone of a new set of recommendations from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.
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Overweight Young Adults Often Have Overweight Friends, Sweethearts
healthday.com - 1-15-11
Young adults who are overweight or obese tend to befriend and date people who are also overweight or obese, new research indicates.
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Blood Type O Associated With Less Risk for Heart AttackBlood Type O Associated With Less Risk for Heart Attack
healthday.com - 1-15-11
Researchers have simultaneously discovered a gene that seems to raise the risk of cardiovascular disease, while also noting that having the blood type O might guard against heart attack once arteries become clogged.
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Pregnant Women Awash in Chemicals. Is That Bad for Baby?
healthland.time.com - 1-15-11
In addition to big bellies, pregnant women are toting around dozens of chemicals, including some that have been banned for decades and others used in flame retardants, sunscreens and non-stick cookware.
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Poverty soars as millions of Americans head to food banks
naturalnews.com - 1-14-11
Those who insist the "recession" is over might want to tell that to the nearly 50 million people, and growing, in the U.S. that are now considered to be "food insecure," or unable to provide food for themselves and their families. According to Chaz Valenza, a New Jersey-based writer and small business owner, thousands of Americans that were once considered middle and even upper-middle class are now entering the ranks of the poor and hungry.
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Airborne Pathogens Can Induce Mad Cow Disease, New Findings Suggest
sciencedaily.com - 1-14-11
Airborne prions are also infectious and can induce mad cow disease or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disorder, new findings suggest. This is the surprising conclusion of researchers at the University of Zurich, the University Hospital Zurich and the University of Tübingen. They recommend precautionary measures for scientific labs, slaughterhouses and animal feed plants.
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Suicide Risk Greater for People Living at Higher Elevations, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 1-14-11
Twenty years of mortality data from counties across the United States led to the striking discovery that living at higher altitudes may be a risk factor for suicide, according to a provocative study published online ahead of print in High Altitude Medicine & Biology, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
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The More You Walk, the Lower Your Diabetes Risk: Study
healthday.com - 1-14-11
10,000 steps daily 5 days a week three times more protective than just 3,000 steps a day
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FDA Lowers Amount of Acetaminophen Allowed in Prescription Painkillers
healthday.com - 1-14-11
U.S. health officials announced Thursday that they will lower the maximum amount of the pain reliever acetaminophen allowed in prescription opioid products such as Vicodin and Percocet because of reports of severe liver damage.
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Waterville police seize rolling pot nursery
pressherald.com - 1-14-11
Police get all sorts of odd calls, but nothing quite like the one they got Tuesday night. click image to enlarge
A woman on Green Street reported seeing two men pushing what appeared to be a huge toolbox down the street, and it was making a lot of noise.
It turned out to be a large self-contained marijuana-growing unit, with lights, fans and a watering system inside, said Police Chief Joseph Massey.
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High Level of 'Good' Cholesterol Alone May Not Protect Heart
healthday.com - 1-13-11
High levels of HDL cholesterol -- the "good" kind -- have long been thought to help protect against heart disease. But new research finds that having high levels of HDL cholesterol may matter less than how well the good cholesterol functions -- that is, how well it works to rid the body of excess cholesterol.
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Drug-resistant malaria could spread fast, expert warns
reuters.com - 1-13-11
Drug-resistant malaria could spread from southeast Asia to Africa within months, putting millions of children's lives at risk, a leading expert warned on Wednesday.
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How to stop tinnitus - retune the brain
telegraph.co.uk - 1-13-11
Hundreds of thousands of Britons suffering from tinnitus which causes incessant ringing in the ears could be cured by "retuning" part of the brain, scientists have discovered.
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Man fined $5,200 for growing cucumbers in basement
naturalnews.com - 1-13-11
Mission, British Columbia, resident Len Gratto recently experienced the wrath of local city officials who fined him $5,200 for growing cucumbers in his basement. Under current laws, municipal regulators are permitted to enter premises on suspicion that a homeowner is illegally growing marijuana -- and even if no pot is found, they can levy the fines anyway.
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Working with plasticizers, pesticides may reduce fertility
usatoday.com - 1-13-11
Women exposed to plasticizers and pesticides at work are more likely to suffer fertility problems and to have lower birth-weight babies, according to a new study.
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Antibiotics Can Ease Kids' Ear Infections, Studies Show
healthday.com - 1-13-11
Amid the ongoing controversy over routine antibiotic use for children with acute ear infections, two new studies support the practice when stringent diagnostic criteria are met.
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Down's syndrome DNA blood test 'better screening offer'
bbc.co.uk - 1-13-11
A DNA blood test for Down's syndrome could save nearly all pregnant women from invasive tests like amniocentesis, say experts.
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New Technology Could Silence the Shriek of a Dental Drill
abcnews.go.com - 1-12-11
If you cringe at the high-pitched squeal of a dentist's drill, you're not alone. Studies have shown it's that very sound that makes people anxious about going to the dentist.
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Vaccinations and allergy shots causing allergies to aluminum
naturalnews.com - 1-12-11
An allergic reaction to aluminum used to be extraordinarily rare. That's not true any more, however, and researchers have been baffled for an explanation. Now it appears one has been found. It turns out that as the number of vaccinations people are given has increased, so has the incidence of the formerly almost non-existent aluminum allergy.
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Possible Off-Switch for Anxiety Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 1-12-11
Scientists from the Agency of Science, Technology and Research/Duke-NUS Neuroscience Research Partnership (A*STAR/Duke-NUS NRP), A*STAR's Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, and the National University of Singapore have made a breakthrough concerning how anxiety is regulated in the vertebrate brain. Their work, published in the journal Current Biology, sheds light on how the brain normally shuts off anxiety and also establishes the relevance of zebrafish as a model for human psychiatric disorders.
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Report Alleges Money Motivated Doctor Behind Autism-Vaccine Scare
healthday.com - 1-12-11
The disgraced doctor who published a study more than 10 years ago claiming that a common childhood vaccine -- the measles-mumps-rubella inoculation -- causes autism may have been motivated more by money than conviction, investigators say.
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Vaccine for shingles ailment effective -- and seldom used, study says
miamiherald.com - 1-12-11
A vaccine for the painful disease called shingles is highly effective, a new study says. But too few have heard of it.
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Too Much TV Time May Hurt Your Heart
news.health.com - 1-11-11
Spending lots of free time glued to the TV or computer screen can hurt your heart and shorten your life, no matter how much exercise you get when you're not riding the couch, a new study suggests.
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Moving Music Spurs Dopamine Spike in Brain
abcnews.go.com - 1-11-11
Today Trevor Gibbons, 54, can walk, talk, and even sing, despite having lost the use of his vocal cords and much of the right side of his body after having two strokes and falling from a 4-story window in 2001. The miracle remedy he credits with his ability to overcome the pain, disability, and depression that accompanied his accident? Music.
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Cash machines 'as dirty as toilets'
telegraph.co.uk - 1-11-11
Cash machines are as dirty as public lavatories, according to tests showing they carry bacteria which can cause sickness and diarrhoea.
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Giving IV fluids on scene might raise death risk for trauma victims
usatoday.com - 1-11-11
The long-standing practice of first giving severely wounded trauma patients intravenous (IV) fluids before bringing them to a trauma center may actually raise their risk of death, a new study suggests.
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Fish oil may help some heart failure patients
usatoday.com - 1-11-11
For heart failure patients whose condition is controlled with standard care, omega-3 fatty acid supplements appear to improve their condition even more, a small study suggests.
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Statins May Be Harmful After Stroke
healthday.com - 1-11-11
Patients given cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins after suffering a stroke caused by bleeding in the brain may be at an increased risk of having another such stroke, a new study suggests.
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Too Much TV May Be Linked to Heart Attack, Death Risk
healthday.com - 1-11-11
Too much time spent watching TV or sitting in front of a computer may increase your risk for heart disease and even shorten your life, a new British study found.
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Sugary Drinks, Foods Might Put Teens at Risk for Heart Disease
healthday.com - 1-11-11
Teens whose diets include lots of sugary drinks and foods show physical signs that they are at increased risk for heart disease as adults, researchers from Emory University report.
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Bacteria Eyed for Possible Role in Atherosclerosis
sciencedaily.com - 1-10-11
Dr. Emil Kozarov and a team of researchers at the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine have identified specific bacteria that may have a key role in vascular pathogenesis, specifically atherosclerosis, or what is commonly referred to as "hardening of the arteries" -- the number one cause of death in the United States.
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High fluoride intake may boost risk of forearm fracture
foodconsumer.org - 1-10-11
A study in Epidemiology suggests that high cumulative intake of fluoride or long term exposure to fluoride through water fluoridation may boost risk of forearm fracture in women.
Some other studies have suggested that high intake of fluoride may increase risk of hip fracture.
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Should you have your silver fillings replaced?
usatoday.com - 1-10-11
Cavities are nothing to smile about but is there greater worry for the millions who have "amalgam" fillings - silver-colored fillings with mercury?
Many health advocacy groups, such as Consumers for Dental Choice, claim the fillings are dangerous.
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Study links obesity to greater pain, weakness in fibromyalgia patients
usatoday.com - 1-10-11
Obese fibromyalgia patients suffer more severe symptoms such as pain, reduced flexibility and sleep disturbances than those of normal weight, a new study indicates.
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Immune Disorders May Raise Blood Clot Risk in Hospitalized Patients
healthday.com - 1-10-11
People with immune-related disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus may be at increased risk for developing potentially deadly blood clots during hospital stays, a new study has found.
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Stroke recovery boosted by a course of Prozac
bbc.co.uk - 1-10-11
Giving stroke patients Prozac soon after the event could help their recovery from paralysis, a study has found.
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More young people are winding up in nursing homes
news.yahoo.com - 1-10-11
Adam Martin doesn't fit in here. No one else in this nursing home wears Air Jordans. No one else has stacks of music videos by 2Pac and Jay-Z. No one else is just 26.
It's no longer unusual to find a nursing home resident who is decades younger than his neighbor: About one in seven people now living in such facilities in the U.S. is under 65. But the growing phenomenon presents a host of challenges for nursing homes, while patients like Martin face staggering isolation.
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Closely Spaced Pregnancies May Contribute to Autism
healthland.time.com - 1-10-11
As researchers continue to learn more about autism-its causes and risk factors-it is increasingly clear that there isn't a single driver for the developmental disorder, and no simple answer to why rates of the condition appear to be on the rise.
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Fears over mutating swine flu virus that could render vaccine useless
dailymail.co.uk - 1-9-11
A research team has hurriedly been re-formed to investigate whether the swine flu virus has started to mutate in a way that will render the vaccine ineffective.
Senior Government scientists have already discovered slight genetic mutations in the H1N1 virus.
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Marijuana Dispensaries Are Facing New Scrutiny
nytimes.com - 1-9-11
Medical marijuana dispensaries try hard to maintain the appearance that they are nonprofit health centers. Customers are referred to as "patients," and merchandise as "medicine." Yoga classes are often available, along with health-related literature.
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Winning the lottery: Does it guarantee happiness?
cnn.com - 1-9-11
She was a mother of three living in a small apartment and working four jobs. And then, as if in a fairy tale, she won her state's lottery last year. But the story doesn't have the happy ending you might expect.
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Extreme Obesity Raises Death Risk from H1N1 Flu
abcnews.go.com - 1-9-11
Extreme obesity was associated with an increased risk of death for people infected with the H1N1 pandemic flu, researchers reported.
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New flu jabs will not protect the elderly
telegraph.co.uk - 1-9-11
Millions of flu jabs being rushed out to plug vaccine shortfalls will not protect the elderly against a strain of the virus now putting them at increased risk, experts have warned.
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No surgery for moderate tonsillitis, new guidelines say
usatoday.com - 1-9-11
Doctors should use antibiotics and a wait-and-see approach when treating repeated throat infections in children and resort to a tonsillectomy only in the most severe cases, new medical guidelines suggest.
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Dioxin scare: German feed fat 'contains 77 times limit'
bbc.co.uk - 1-9-11
Newly released test results have revealed much more of a toxic chemical in tainted animal feed than previously thought.
The tests at the plant in northern Germany where the contamination happened revealed levels of dioxin at 77 times the permitted level.The tests at the plant in northern Germany where the contamination happened revealed levels of dioxin at 77 times the permitted level.
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Tree die-off presents human health risk
upi.com - 1-8-11
A recent die-off of aspen trees in the U.S. West has swelled the population of rodents that carry a virus that can be deadly to humans, researchers say.
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A Talk With the Doctor May Help Patients Afford Care
nytimes.com - 1-8-11
READERS of this column have been advised more than once to negotiate prices with health care providers for things like an M.R.I. scan, surgery and office visits. With patients paying more out of pocket for their health care than ever before - in the form of higher co-payments and co-insurance, high deductibles and uncovered and out-of-network treatments - negotiating with doctors and other providers has become commonplace.
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High levels of vitamins C and E help prevent metabolic syndrome
naturalnews.com - 1-8-11
The precursors to cardiovascular disease and diabetes include a range of markers collectively known as metabolic syndrome. And researchers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA) at Tufts University have found that maintaining high levels of both vitamin C and vitamin E helps to prevent the onset of metabolic syndrome.
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Researchers discover a shocking 96 percent decline in four major bumblebee species
naturalnews.com - 1-8-11
New research published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has found that another vitally important pollinator, the bumblebee, is in serious decline. According to the figures, there has been a shocking 96 percent decline in four major species of the bumblebee, and an up to 87 percent decrease in their overall geographic coverage.
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Study: Blacks less likely to have living wills, medical directives
usatoday.com - 1-8-11
Nearly two-thirds of nursing home patients have advance directives, documents allowing people to make end of life decisions when they might not be able to speak for themselves, a government study shows.
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Study: Newer Antipsychotic Drugs Are Overused
webmd.com - 1-8-11
Many people taking powerful psychiatric medications that increase their risk of weight gain and diabetes are prescribed those drugs when there's little evidence that they will get any benefit from them, a new study shows.
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Gestures May 'Shape' Thoughts
healthday.com - 1-8-11
The hand gestures you use while talking can actually shape your thoughts, a new study suggests.
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Teens Breast-fed as Infants Have Stronger Leg Muscles
healthday.com - 1-8-11
Adolescents who were breast-fed as infants have stronger leg muscles and "explosive strength" than those who were not breast-fed, a new study finds.
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U.S. Officials Recommend Reduced Fluoride Levels in Water
healthday.com - 1-8-11
U.S. government officials said Friday that the amount of fluoride in the nation's drinking water should now be set at the lowest recommended level.
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Boulder accidentally discloses secret marijuana grow sites
dailycamera.com - 1-8-11
A map marking what are supposed to be secret locations of 60 warehouses and other buildings where medical marijuana is grown in Boulder has accidentally been made public by the city.
State law prohibits local governments from disclosing the location of so-called cultivation centers, and state lawmakers have exempted records that contain identifying information about the sites from the Colorado Open Records Act out of fear that would-be thieves might target large growing operations.
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Addicts could break drug habit with vaccine that makes immune system see cocaine as 'intruder'
dailymail.co.uk - 1-7-11
Researchers have developed a vaccine that could help drug addicts to both break and reverse their costly habit.
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Why some cancers seems to develop in an instant - cells can explode wreaking havoc in DNA
dailymail.co.uk - 1-7-11
The mystery of 'instant cancers' - tumours that seem to appear out of nowhere - has been solved by British scientists.
In some cases, a single apocalyptic 'explosion' in a cell can cause as much damage to the DNA as decades of hard living.
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Study Linking Vaccine to Autism Was Fraud, Journal Reports
nytimes.com - 1-7-11
The first study to link a childhood vaccine to autism was based on doctored information about the children involved, according to a new report on the widely discredited research.
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'Gut Instinct' May Stem From the Heart
healthday.com - 1-7-11
Everyone feels gut instincts at one time or another: Marry that guy! Don't take that job. Stay inside during this snowstorm! Now, a new study suggests there is indeed a link between your heartbeat and the decisions you make.
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Early Steps Toward an Alzheimer's Blood Test
healthday.com - 1-7-11
A blood test that screens for antibodies, a protein produced by the immune system, may one day be used to detect Alzheimer's and other diseases, new research suggests.
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Circumcision helps stop wart virus, study finds
reuters.com - 1-7-11
Researchers have documented yet another health benefit for circumcision, which can protect men against the AIDS virus, saying it can protect their wives and girlfriends from a virus that causes cervical cancer.
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Antibiotic May Help Ease Irritable Bowel
healthday.com - 1-6-11
A two-week course of an antibiotic relieved bloating and other symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, a common gastrointestinal disorder, for more than two months after treatment ended, new research shows.
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Health-care spending rose less in 2009
washingtonpost.com - 1-6-11
The nation's expenditures on health care in 2009 grew by 4 percent, the smallest increase in at least a half-century, according to new federal figures that suggest Americans stinted on medical services as they lost jobs and insurance in the recent recession.
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Good bedside manners help patients get better faster... and saves hospitals money as well
dailymail.co.uk - 1-6-11
A good bedside manner really does help patients recover faster and feel happier, say researchers.
Compassion for the sick is sometimes forgotten in the drive for savings and efficiencies, they warn.
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ADHD stops children being able to switch off daydreaming brain
telegraph.co.uk - 1-6-11
Researchers found that they physically find it harder to switch off a "default setting" of the brain designed to pass the time when not focused on a task.
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Giving antibiotics to babies could increase asthma risk
telegraph.co.uk - 1-6-11
Researchers found infants treated with the drugs faced a 40 per cent rise in the risk of the incurable condition if they were prescribed a single course of treatment in the first few months of life.
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If given a fair choice, most consumers would choose alternative medicine over conventional health care
naturalnews.com - 1-6-11
As a strong proponent of free market economics, I have long wondered why free markets don't seem to be operating in the health care industry. Today, it finally hit me with great clarity, and I'll share that with you here. But first, a primer on free market economics.
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Doctor Behind Study Linking Vaccine to Autism Accused of 'Deliberate Fraud'
healthday.com - 1-6-11
An in-depth investigation just published in a prominent medical journal alleges that a decade-long effort to link childhood vaccinations with autism was really an elaborate hoax perpetuated by a British doctor who has since been banned from practicing medicine in that country.
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Walk faster and you just might live longer
msnbc.msn.com - 1-5-11
Doctors who are interested in measuring life expectancy may now have a simple way to do it - researchers have discovered that walking speed can be a useful predictor of how long older adults live.
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9 Ways You Can Help Someone Who's Depressed
health.com - 1-5-11
When someone you know and love is clinically depressed, you want to be there for that person. Still, keep in mind that your friend or loved one has a medical condition, so giving support may mean more than just offering a shoulder to cry on.
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The top five negative-calorie health foods that burn fat while making you feel full
naturalnews.com - 1-5-11
How do you eat more while losing more weight at the same time? One of the best answers is to eat "negative-calorie" foods, meaning that these foods actually take more energy to digest than they deliver to your body. While these foods may be an important source of phytonutrients, they are not sources of fat-packing calories.
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Oestrogen 'may fuel oral cancer' in young women
bbc.co.uk - 1-5-11
The hormone oestrogen could be fuelling head and neck cancers in young women, explaining why the disease is on the increase in that group, a US team says.
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Experts claim to discover 'root cause' of male baldness
bbc.co.uk - 1-5-11
Experts say they have discovered what they believe is the root cause of male pattern baldness.
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Many May Get Unneeded Implantable Defibrillators
healthday.com - 1-5-11
About 20 percent of U.S. patients who receive an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) may not need it, a new study finds.
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Leaked document shows EPA allowed bee-toxic pesticide despite own scientists' red flags
grist.org - 1-5-11
It's not just the State and Defense departments that are reeling this month from leaked documents. The Environmental Protection Agency now has some explaining to do, too. In place of dodgy dealings with foreign leaders, this case involves the German agrichemical giant Bayer; a pesticide with an unpronounceable name, clothianidin; and an insect species crucial to food production (as well as a food producer itself), the honeybee.
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Salvia Studies Hold Promise for Addiction
abcnews.go.com - 1-4-11
Scientists are taking a fresh look at salvia -- the controversial drug that can cause an intense psychedelic experience -- as a potential treatment for an array of neurological disorders, including addiction.
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Can't kick bad habits? Blame the brain
msnbc.msn.com - 1-4-11
Uh-oh, the new year's just begun and already you're finding it hard to keep those resolutions to junk the junk food, get off the couch or kick smoking. There's a biological reason a lot of our bad habits are so hard to break - they get wired into our brains.
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SAD: When seasons change how you feel
cnn.com - 1-4-11
By 10 a.m. every day during the winters, Rachelle Strauss felt like she could go back to bed. She used to be a morning person, but that all changed about 10 years ago when she started to feel exhausted as the darkest days dragged on.
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Sepsis (Blood Infection) and Septic Shock
webmd.com - 1-4-11
Sepsis is a serious medical condition caused by an overwhelming immune response to infection. Chemicals released into the blood to fight infection trigger widespread inflammation.
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Olive oil, green leafy vegetables prevent heart disease
naturalnews.com - 1-4-11
Italian researchers have confirmed that diets rich in leafy green vegetables and olive oil are vital for heart health. Dr. Domenico Palli from the Cancer Research and Prevention Institute in Florence and his colleagues discovered that women who eat at least one serving of leafy greens a day are 46 percent less likely to develop heart disease than women who eat less. And those who consume at least three tablespoons of olive oil a day earn roughly the same benefit.
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Europe, Japan to cancel grain contracts with Australia due to GMO contamination
naturalnews.com - 1-4-11
Australia is playing with fire by relaxing its standards on genetically-modified organisms (GMO). According to a recent report in The Australian, both Europe and Japan may cancel their non-GMO grain contracts with Australian growers because of GM contamination, including the recent case of Steve Marsh who lost his organic certification due to GM canola invading his fields.
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Scientists Aim for Test That Could Spot Single Cancer Cell in Blood
healthday.com - 1-4-11
A collaborative effort involving U.S. scientists and private companies is looking into a test that could find even one stray cancer cell among the billions of cells that circulate in the human bloodstream.
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Spain's strict new anti-smoking rules take effect
bbc.co.uk - 1-4-11
The ban - one of the strictest in Europe - outlaws smoking in all bars and restaurants. Smokers will also be prohibited on television broadcasts, near hospitals or in school playgrounds.
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In Women, Diabetes Plus Depression a Deadly Combo
businessweek.com - 1-4-11
Women suffering from both diabetes and depression have a greater risk of dying, especially from heart disease, a new study suggests.
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Swine flu spreading faster in Britain than rest of Europe
telegraph.co.uk - 1-3-11
Swine flu has spread more rapidly in Britain than in the rest of Europe, the World Health Organization has revealed, as the Government faces growing criticism over the country's preparations for an epidemic.
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Overweight women 'feel humiliated every day'
telegraph.co.uk - 1-3-11
Aged between 45 and 54, the archetypal overweight woman has been married for 20 years, weighs 13 stone and three pounds, wears a size 18 dress, and experiences humiliation every day, according to weight loss group Slimming World.
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Councilman to introduce legislation to stop fluoridation of New York City water supply
naturalnews.com - 1-3-11
The momentum to remove fluoride from America's water supplies is picking up steam, thanks to mounting evidence that the toxic chemical byproduct of the aluminum and phosphate fertilizer industries causes brain damage, thyroid problems and cancer. Councilman Peter Vallone (D-Queens) recently told those attending a city council meeting that he plans to introduce legislation to remove fluoride from the nation's most populous city.
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Pesticides used in California 'salad bowl' growing region destroying health of workers, children
naturalnews.com - 1-3-11
Pesticide residues found on conventional fruits and vegetables have been shown to be harmful to health, but what about the people who pick this produce and the children they bare? According to recent studies, field workers and their children who live in the Salinas Valley of California, also known as the world's "salad bowl" because of its massive produce exports, are experiencing significant developmental and other health problems as a result of continual pesticide exposure.
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Medicare To Gain 7,000 New Baby Boomers Per Day In 2011
medicalnewstoday.com - 1-3-11
In 2010, there will be 7,000 new Medicare beneficiaries each day; a total of 2.5 million baby boomers who will swamp America's senior's health care insurance program. According to AARP (American Association for Retired Person's), 70 million individuals are estimated to be Medicare beneficiaries over the next 20 years, compared to 45.2 million in 2008.
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Americans just won't eat their vegetables
naturalnews.com - 1-2-11
Twenty years of government and public interest programs aimed at increasing US vegetable consumption have had no significant effect on the country's dietary habits, according to a comprehensive nationwide study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
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Craving for alcohol linked to obesity
msnbc.msn.com - 1-2-11
People with a family history of alcoholism, especially women, have an elevated risk of also becoming obese, according to a new study. And the link between the two appears to be strengthening - the risk of becoming obese, for people with alcoholics in their family, is higher now than in the past, the researchers said.
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Surprising Heartburn Triggers
health.com - 1-2-11
Heartburn is as American as apple pie-more than 60 million people experience it at least once a month. For some people-those with gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD-heartburn can be a constant companion.
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Stuffy Nose? 5 Ways to Tell if You Need an Antibiotic
health.com - 1-2-11
Think antibiotics are a quick fix for a stuffy nose, cough, and sore throat? You're not alone. Tom Campbell, MD, a family physician from Rochester, N.Y., says that patients often plead for antibiotics for garden-variety cold symptoms, saying everything from "The last time it helped me completely" to "I have to go to my daughter's wedding" and "There's this terrible green guck coming out of my nose."
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Ring in the New Year With Cheer -- Not a Hangover
abcnews.go.com - 1-2-11
Praying to the porcelain god, your heart races and you wonder if someone has chopped an axe through you head. Why, why, why? you ask.
Well, you drank too much, silly.
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2010 in review: Here's what happened in the world of natural health and health freedom
naturalnews.com - 1-2-11
With 2010 officially over, here's a look at the trends and top stories of the year in the world of natural health and health freedom.
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In U.S., Obesity Afflicts Even Some of the Tiniest Tots
healthday.com - 1-2-11
American kids are becoming obese, or nearly so, at an increasingly young age, with about one-third of them falling into that category by the time they're 9 months old, researchers have found.
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Anger at God Common During Times of Crisis, Study Finds
healthday.com - 1-2-11
Although people rarely talk about it, almost everyone experiences anger toward God at some point in their lives, commonly after the diagnosis of a serious illness, the death of a loved one or a trauma.
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Boomers Hit New Self-Absorption Milestone: Age 65
nytimes.com - 1-1-11
In keeping with a generation's fascination with itself, the time has come to note the passing of another milestone: On New Year's Day, the oldest members of the Baby Boom Generation will turn 65, the age once linked to retirement, early bird specials and gray Velcro shoes that go with everything.
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Unhealthy lifestyle 'ingrained by age 16'
telegraph.co.uk - 1-1-11
Unhealthy lifestyle choices could be so ingrained in us by the time we are 16 that there is no way back from a life of illness, scientists claim.
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Fifth of women have used morning after pill in last year
telegraph.co.uk - 1-1-11
A fifth of young women have used the emergency contraception pill in the last year - many after drinking heavily or taking drugs - a study indicates.
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More than 25 percent of children now on chronic prescription medications
naturalnews.com - 1-1-11
The rate of prescription drug use among children and teens continues to rise, with a new report from Medco Health Solutions Inc. saying that at least a quarter of all U.S. children are now regularly taking pharmaceutical drugs. And according to the report, many of these drugs were originally intended for adults, and carry with them unknown side effects for long-term use in young people.
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New health-care rules to take effect
washingtonpost.com - 1-1-11
The new year will bring important changes to U.S. health-insurance rules, as new provisions related to last year's massive health-care overhaul take effect.
The new rules are designed to help those caught in Medicare's "doughnut hole," offer seniors more preventative care, and limit how much of their customers' money health-insurance companies can keep for overhead and profit.
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